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    I am an AS Level student studying History, English Lang&Lit, Religious Studies and Psychology. I have been revising for about a month(and I revised for my mocks), but all I have been doing is making notes. I have 8 exams, starting Monday, until the 26th. Therefore, all I need is to remember my notes, I do remember the basics , I just need to start memorising quotes, facts and figures. HELP!!
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    (Original post by lololoh)
    I am an AS Level student studying History, English Lang&Lit, Religious Studies and Psychology. I have been revising for about a month(and I revised for my mocks), but all I have been doing is making notes. I have 8 exams, starting Monday, until the 26th. Therefore, all I need is to remember my notes, I do remember the basics , I just need to start memorising quotes, facts and figures. HELP!!
    Hi! We take similar Humanities based subjects so I think I can help you a bit with this! As an A2 student, I take English, History and Spanish (last year for AS I dropped Sociology) so I hope this helps!

    For English, definitely, it's about memorising those quotes and key points of analysis that you may often use in essays that just kind of tick the boxes and really illuminate your response. Practice as well, is always incredibly importance, exams starting Monday, I don't necessarily think that practice is ever going to be a waste of time so maybe just try planning a few questions just to get you in the mindset of eventually doing it.

    For History, it's also a bit of the same, memorising the key facts and figures that are important, dates and their influence over movements during the period that you study etc, practice again is always key but if it's too late for that, practice giving yourself an unseen question, never expected and just answer it, don't cheat, don't look at textbooks, put yourself in the mood you will be in when you actually physically sit the exam. But in terms of cramming, dates, facts, figures, political leaders, historical movements etc are all great to memorise before the exam.

    Last year I took Sociology, I'm not sure how much use I would be for Psychology but for me at least, Sociology was about memorising all of those key studies, so memorising key studies for each topic will be highly important I assume, for Psychology as well.

    In general, I would say you should have refined your writing style by now and when cramming focus on having the content down to a T, as opposed to reading essays or reading the textbook, use your past revision notes, actively revise by brainstorming, creating charts and don't forget, you should always practice - EVEN if its a planned question and not a fully written one. Another little tip is to read your highest scoring essays before the exam, either on the day of or before the exam, this will remind you of your best writing style, structure etc etc.

    Good luck!
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    The only subject I am doing from the list is English Literature and my advice is to read the texts at least 2-3 times if you haven't done so already.

    Find notes here on TSR, print them off and read through them multiple times. Same with your teacher's notes, your own written notes etc. Read them all. Once you're done, read them again. It's all about memorising really and being familiar.

    For the closed book exams you will need to learn quotes, obviously, but you need to learn 'em for the open book exams as well because you won't have time to be flicking through pages looking for specific quotes, UNLESS you can remember the exact page and paragraph it is on.

    For example, I am doing the tragedy genre, and there are a list of tragic aspects released from AQA for each text -
    a set for King Lear, a set for Death of a Salesman, a set for Gatsby and a set for Hardy Poetry.
    What I am doing is, for the plays and Gatsby, I have matched particular quotations that meet each aspects and then grouped them under each tragic aspect. So I have a list of quotations regarding 'tragic inevitability' in The Great Gatsby, and a list of quotations regarding 'tragic downfall' in King Lear, and then used genius.com to find annotations regarding each quote.
    And then for the poetry I have gone through each of the 17 poems and grouped them into each of the tragic aspects and then of course annotated the poems.

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by britmj)
    Hi! We take similar Humanities based subjects so I think I can help you a bit with this! As an A2 student, I take English, History and Spanish (last year for AS I dropped Sociology) so I hope this helps!

    For English, definitely, it's about memorising those quotes and key points of analysis that you may often use in essays that just kind of tick the boxes and really illuminate your response. Practice as well, is always incredibly importance, exams starting Monday, I don't necessarily think that practice is ever going to be a waste of time so maybe just try planning a few questions just to get you in the mindset of eventually doing it.

    For History, it's also a bit of the same, memorising the key facts and figures that are important, dates and their influence over movements during the period that you study etc, practice again is always key but if it's too late for that, practice giving yourself an unseen question, never expected and just answer it, don't cheat, don't look at textbooks, put yourself in the mood you will be in when you actually physically sit the exam. But in terms of cramming, dates, facts, figures, political leaders, historical movements etc are all great to memorise before the exam.

    Last year I took Sociology, I'm not sure how much use I would be for Psychology but for me at least, Sociology was about memorising all of those key studies, so memorising key studies for each topic will be highly important I assume, for Psychology as well.

    In general, I would say you should have refined your writing style by now and when cramming focus on having the content down to a T, as opposed to reading essays or reading the textbook, use your past revision notes, actively revise by brainstorming, creating charts and don't forget, you should always practice - EVEN if its a planned question and not a fully written one. Another little tip is to read your highest scoring essays before the exam, either on the day of or before the exam, this will remind you of your best writing style, structure etc etc.

    Good luck!
    Thank you so much! Good luck in your exams x
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    (Original post by maggiedavies)
    The only subject I am doing from the list is English Literature and my advice is to read the texts at least 2-3 times if you haven't done so already.

    Find notes here on TSR, print them off and read through them multiple times. Same with your teacher's notes, your own written notes etc. Read them all. Once you're done, read them again. It's all about memorising really and being familiar.

    For the closed book exams you will need to learn quotes, obviously, but you need to learn 'em for the open book exams as well because you won't have time to be flicking through pages looking for specific quotes, UNLESS you can remember the exact page and paragraph it is on.

    For example, I am doing the tragedy genre, and there are a list of tragic aspects released from AQA for each text -
    a set for King Lear, a set for Death of a Salesman, a set for Gatsby and a set for Hardy Poetry.
    What I am doing is, for the plays and Gatsby, I have matched particular quotations that meet each aspects and then grouped them under each tragic aspect. So I have a list of quotations regarding 'tragic inevitability' in The Great Gatsby, and a list of quotations regarding 'tragic downfall' in King Lear, and then used genius.com to find annotations regarding each quote.
    And then for the poetry I have gone through each of the 17 poems and grouped them into each of the tragic aspects and then of course annotated the poems.

    Good luck!
    Thank you!!!
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    (Original post by lololoh)
    Thank you so much! Good luck in your exams x
    Thank you! And you too!
 
 
 
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