Can you help me with a sentence?

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CherishFreedom
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I have recently posted a sentence on a political forum but a member said that it is grammatically incorrect.

'The UK is free to join the EFTA, of which there is immediate membership considering we meet the requirements.'

His explanation was:

Your problem is that your construction makes no sense. "Considering" in the British idiom means, in the sense you use it, "in light of" or "as has been established". Example:

"I should win this race, considering I'm such a good runner!"

Not:

"I should win this race, considering that I might enter it, tie my laces up and drag myself over to the starting line."

You didn't write:

"The UK is free to join EFTA, of which there is immediate membership if the UK considers and accepts the membership criteria."


I was not born in the UK therefore I am not in the best position to say that I am right. Can anyone assist me on whether the member is correct? Can you deduce the natural meaning of my statement?
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RVNmax
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The member is correct in that if you meant to say the last one, your original sentence doesn't convey that whole message across and so lacks some clarity.


The first sentence says that the UK meets EFTA's requirements for joining and so the membership is immediate, although the tenses are confusing. I'm assuming the first one clause is correct and so I would word the second clause of that sentence like this (change 'is' to 'would be'):
The UK is free to join the EFTA, to which membership would be immediate, considering we meet the requirements.

The last sentence focuses on the fact that it is the UK's choice whether to accept the membership criteria of EFTA and hence join or not, but unlike the first sentence it doesn't say why the membership would be immediate (i.e. because it meets the requirements of EFTA).

Right now I can't be bothered to research and check which bits are factually true to work out what you might actually be trying to say, so will understand how to formulate the sentence using the facts that you actually want to convey.
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CherishFreedom
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(Original post by RVNmax)
The member is correct in that if you meant to say the last one, your original sentence doesn't convey that whole message across and so lacks some clarity.


The first sentence says that the UK meets EFTA's requirements for joining and so the membership is immediate, although the tenses are confusing. I'm assuming the first one clause is correct and so I would word the second clause of that sentence like this (change 'is' to 'would be':
The UK is free to join the EFTA, to which membership would be immediate, considering we meet the requirements.

The last sentence focuses on the fact that it is the UK's choice whether to accept the membership criteria of EFTA and hence join or not, but unlike the first sentence it doesn't say why the membership would be immediate (i.e. because it meets the requirements of EFTA).

Right now I can't be bothered to research and check which bits are factually true to work out what you might actually be trying to say, so will understand how to formulate the sentence using the facts that you actually want to convey.
Good morning! Just wondering if we are both staying up to revise for exams?

I meant the first one.What I was conveying:

1. The UK is free to join the EFTA.

2. If the UK meets the requirements (accepting EFTA terms, parliamentary approval, submission of application), membership is issued immediately.

I'm just wondering if 'considering' can be used in the same context as 'in the condition that'?

Another example:'Your application is approved immediately, considering you meet the entry requirements.'

Thanks for your help.
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RVNmax
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(Original post by CherishFreedom)
Good morning! Just wondering if we are both staying up to revise for exams?

I meant the first one.What I was conveying:

1. The UK is free to join the EFTA.

2. If the UK meets the requirements (accepting EFTA terms, parliamentary approval, submission of application), membership is issued immediately.

I'm just wondering if 'considering' can be used in the same context as 'in the condition that'.

Another example:'You will be offered a place in the course, considering you meet the entry requirements.'
Ah, so that is what you meant. So in that case, it wasn't really the first one as I had taken it. You could use 'taking into account' instead, so in effect the word 'considering' conveys a sense of certainty as opposed to conditionally. You should have used 'in the condition that' rather than 'considering' as they do not convey the same message.

I would still use 'would be' instead of 'is' though. The same two changes for your new example as 'would' goes with the fact that it is a condition whereas 'is' would go with the actual meaning of 'considering'.
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CherishFreedom
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The second sentence wasn't written by me, it was from the other member.

I guess we were both slightly off in context?
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