Geography Corrie Formation perfect paragraph ????

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ASNinja98
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Hi guys if anyone is doing As geography and has the time to give me feedback question.

Describe and explain the formation of the erosion landform corries (7 Marks)

A corrie is a arm chair like feature formed from glacial erosion. Corries form in hollows where snow can acclimate, this accumulation can then causes snow to build up over many year to from Neve. The hollow is depend by nivation which is the combined effects of repeated freeze thaw and removal of material by meltwater, which starts to deepen the landscape and form a corrie. Snow and ice moves down the gradient due to gravity in a rotational movement. Ice then freezes to the back wall and as it does plucking occurs steeping the back wall further. Freeze thaw and frost shattering deposit material from above the hollow on to the ice and as it moves under the ice it enhances the glaciers capacity to erode steeping the back wall further. The area in front of the corrie where the gradient starts to increase again is known as the lip.

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username2088165
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(Original post by ASNinja98)
Hi guys if anyone is doing As geography and has the time to give me feedback question.

Describe and explain the formation of the erosion landform corries (7 Marks)

A corrie is a arm chair like feature formed from glacial erosion. Corries form in hollows where snow can acclimate, this accumulation can then causes snow to build up over many year to from Neve. The hollow is depend by nivation which is the combined effects of repeated freeze thaw and removal of material by meltwater, which starts to deepen the landscape and form a corrie. Snow and ice moves down the gradient due to gravity in a rotational movement. Ice then freezes to the back wall and as it does plucking occurs steeping the back wall further. Freeze thaw and frost shattering deposit material from above the hollow on to the ice and as it moves under the ice it enhances the glaciers capacity to erode steeping the back wall further. The area in front of the corrie where the gradient starts to increase again is known as the lip.

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Hi! I did geography with WJEC, and we did a module on glaciation (albeit for A2), so hopefully I can help a bit!

I think your answer is good, but I think it could be a bit more detailed (I know that for WJEC, we had to pretty much explain everything!). Too much detail is also better than not enough in my opinion, because then you're more likely to get marks :yep:

I've added a bit to your answer, let me know what you think:

A corrie is an arm chair shaped landform formed from glacial erosion, found in the sides of mountains. Corries have a steep back wall and a smooth rock lip (the area in front of the corrie where the gradient starts to increase again), and many are larger than 1km in size. Corries form in hollows where snow can accumulate, and this accumulation then causes snow to build up over many years to from 'neve', and eventually glacial ice. The hollow is deepened by a process called nivation, which is the effects of repeated freeze thaw weathering, where liquid water enters cracks in the rock, then expands by 9% of its volume when it freezes, pushing the rock apart. The water then melts again and moves deeper into the rock, and the the freeze-thaw cycle repeats. Nivation also involves removal of material by meltwater (sheetwash), which starts to deepen the hollow and form a corrie. Snow and ice moves down the slope due to gravity, in a rotational movement. The ice then freezes to the back wall of the corrie, and as it does so, plucking occurs steeping the back wall further. Plucking is the process where freeze thaw weathering breaks up the rock, which then freezes to the glacial ice and is removed as the glacier moves. Freeze thaw weathering and frost shattering also deposit material from above the hollow on to the ice and as it moves under the ice it enhances the glaciers capacity to erode via abrasion, steeping the back wall, and enlarging the corrie further.
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ASNinja98
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Yeah thanks see what you mean about the detail ))

(Original post by Leviathan1741)
Hi! I did geography with WJEC, and we did a module on glaciation (albeit for A2), so hopefully I can help a bit!

I think your answer is good, but I think it could be a bit more detailed (I know that for WJEC, we had to pretty much explain everything!). Too much detail is also better than not enough in my opinion, because then you're more likely to get marks :yep:

I've added a bit to your answer, let me know what you think:

A corrie is an arm chair shaped landform formed from glacial erosion, found in the sides of mountains. Corries have a steep back wall and a smooth rock lip (the area in front of the corrie where the gradient starts to increase again), and many are larger than 1km in size. Corries form in hollows where snow can accumulate, and this accumulation then causes snow to build up over many years to from 'neve', and eventually glacial ice. The hollow is deepened by a process called nivation, which is the effects of repeated freeze thaw weathering, where liquid water enters cracks in the rock, then expands by 9% of its volume when it freezes, pushing the rock apart. The water then melts again and moves deeper into the rock, and the the freeze-thaw cycle repeats. Nivation also involves removal of material by meltwater (sheetwash), which starts to deepen the hollow and form a corrie. Snow and ice moves down the slope due to gravity, in a rotational movement. The ice then freezes to the back wall of the corrie, and as it does so, plucking occurs steeping the back wall further. Plucking is the process where freeze thaw weathering breaks up the rock, which then freezes to the glacial ice and is removed as the glacier moves. Freeze thaw weathering and frost shattering also deposit material from above the hollow on to the ice and as it moves under the ice it enhances the glaciers capacity to erode via abrasion, steeping the back wall, and enlarging the corrie further.
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