Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi everyone,

    Was hoping someone on this forum could maybe weigh in a bit on this issue andperhaps give some advice.

    As a quick prelude, this year I applied to LSE and Oxford. I was shortlisted for interview at Oxford, but fell really ill when I was there and performed pretty horribly. My feedback said that I was overall a strong applicant, but because of my interview performance they couldn’t give me a place. Shortly after, I was given an offer for LSE. In all honesty, I wasn’t exactly enthralled by LSE (or London as a city) when I visited, but I felt like it was a good university overall with a great reputation – and the low student satisfaction and what not would just have to be something I dealt with.

    Then, because of personal circumstances, I am in a position where I now have to take a gap year – something I wasn’t really planning to do. However, I am trying to take this in my stride and really work to make it a positive experience for me.

    However, this has left me with a bit of a dilemma. While one option is to defer my entry with LSE, two things are stopping me. One – I feel as though I’ll always regret never having had a proper chance at interview, and in some ways this impromptu gap year would give me an opportunity to solve this. Secondly –I plan on solidifying and making sure that my course choice was right for me throughout the gap year, and this is obviously made difficult if I suddenly want to change course when I’m bound to my deferral.

    Of course, the other side is that both universities are highly competitive (and while I would consider myself a fairly strong applicant) there is always the possibility that I could end up with a place at neither.I think my heart tells me that I should go for what I really want – open up opportunities for myself instead of committing myself to things that I am unsure of – but I know I might feel differently if I have got two rejections later this year haha.

    I’m grateful for any opinions or advice – thank you.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    I don't think anyone should go to a university they're not 100% happy with, especially if they're having doubts about the course. If that means turning down LSE, so be it. There's no rush, take your time and do more research/visit LSE/speak to current students. If after that you still think LSE isn't for you then re-apply to Oxford.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by HarryF150)
    ... I am in a position where I now have to take a gap year – something I wasn’t really planning to do. However, I am trying to take this in my stride and really work to make it a positive experience for me.However, this has left me with a bit of a dilemma. While one option is to defer my entry with LSE...
    Just to be clear, you do know you can't hold a deferred offer to LSE and also re-apply to Oxford? You would have to decline LSE and re-apply to Oxford (and LSE if you want).
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    From the sounds of it you really don't want to go to LSE. If you're also having doubts about the course, then you should absolutely decline the offer and wait until applications next year to apply for courses you want to do.

    I started studying natural science in London, and I really really didn't enjoy it at all. By the end of the first semester I was certain I didn't want to continue, and so I withdrew and reapplied for biology. This ended up being the best decision I've ever made, and I throroughly enjoyed my degree (at the same university).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jneill)
    Just to be clear, you do know you can't hold a deferred offer to LSE and also re-apply to Oxford? You would have to decline LSE and re-apply to Oxford (and LSE if you want).
    Hi - thanks for your response. Yes I'm aware of that - hence the dilemma haha
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by HarryF150)
    Hi - thanks for your response. Yes I'm aware of that - hence the dilemma haha
    If you have to take a gap year then there's no dilemma really...

    I doubt LSE will hold it against you if you withdraw and then re-apply (if you want to re-apply).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by FCB)
    From the sounds of it you really don't want to go to LSE. If you're also having doubts about the course, then you should absolutely decline the offer and wait until applications next year to apply for courses you want to do.

    I started studying natural science in London, and I really really didn't enjoy it at all. By the end of the first semester I was certain I didn't want to continue, and so I withdrew and reapplied for biology. This ended up being the best decision I've ever made, and I throroughly enjoyed my degree (at the same university).
    Hi there - thanks for sharing your experience and for your advice.

    I wouldn't say that I'm necessarily having doubts about my course, but I think that (without sounding horribly cliched) I'd like to do a bit of personal study whilst on my gap year - and I don't want to be tied up so to speak if I change my mind towards something a bit different.

    And I think that I'm just anxious about the low student satisfaction at LSE and what not, and for London universities in general. I'm thinking that if I have the chance to avoid it, I should maybe explore other options when reapplying rather than commit to something that might not be for me.

    Would you say that your issue was more with the course than London itself then? Also, if you don't mind me asking, (obviously they were fairly as you're now studying there haha) how receptive was the university to you reapplying after withdrawing? Did you have any specific dialogue with them about it? I think I'd still probably apply to LSE again if I were to reapply, so I'm curious as to how you're university viewed it.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jneill)
    If you have to take a gap year then there's no dilemma really...

    I doubt LSE will hold it against you if you withdraw and then re-apply (if you want to re-apply).
    Thanks again for your response - I think my dilemma is that I have a sure thing in an offer if I defer (although I understand not all deferrals are granted), as opposed to risk of rejection from both when reapplying? Would LSE not hold it against me for withdrawing and having the gap year, rather than exploring the option of deferring with them?

    I appreciate you're not an LSE admissions officer so can't answer definitively, but if you have any thoughts?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HarryF150)
    Hi there - thanks for sharing your experience and for your advice.

    I wouldn't say that I'm necessarily having doubts about my course, but I think that (without sounding horribly cliched) I'd like to do a bit of personal study whilst on my gap year - and I don't want to be tied up so to speak if I change my mind towards something a bit different.

    And I think that I'm just anxious about the low student satisfaction at LSE and what not, and for London universities in general. I'm thinking that if I have the chance to avoid it, I should maybe explore other options when reapplying rather than commit to something that might not be for me.

    Would you say that your issue was more with the course than London itself then? Also, if you don't mind me asking, (obviously they were fairly as you're now studying there haha) how receptive was the university to you reapplying after withdrawing? Did you have any specific dialogue with them about it? I think I'd still probably apply to LSE again if I were to reapply, so I'm curious as to how you're university viewed it.
    It was about the course. I actually love London, for me it is the best city in the world, and was a fantastic experience studying there. I'm going to Cambridge for my masters now, but Oxbridge is the only two other places I would like to live/study at other than London. The uni were great, I had asked them what my options were while I was still in the natural science programme, and they fully supported me making a decision that I would be happy with.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by HarryF150)
    Thanks again for your response - I think my dilemma is that I have a sure thing in an offer if I defer (although I understand not all deferrals are granted), as opposed to risk of rejection from both when reapplying? Would LSE not hold it against me for withdrawing and having the gap year, rather than exploring the option of deferring with them?

    I appreciate you're not an LSE admissions officer so can't answer definitively, but if you have any thoughts?
    My thought is "no"

    Universities don't take offence or bear grudges ...

    They expect things like this to happen, they over-offer relative to the number of places with the expectation that some people will withdraw (or miss their offer, or whatever). It's really not a problem.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Snufkin)
    I don't think anyone should go to a university they're not 100% happy with, especially if they're having doubts about the course. If that means turning down LSE, so be it. There's no rush, take your time and do more research/visit LSE/speak to current students. If after that you still think LSE isn't for you then re-apply to Oxford.
    Hi - thanks for taking the time to respond.

    I would say it's not so much that I'm having doubts about the course, but (as cliche as it sounds) since I have to have a gap year I plan to make sure I don't deteriorate academically and plan to do a good bit of reading where I know interests could develop and what not. I don't want to have a sudden interest for Y, when I'm bound to a course due to deferal.

    And I have been fortunate to actually visit LSE and talk to some students. I have no doubts whatsoever that LSE is good academically, but they did echo some concerns about the social life and student satisfaction, as well as some general grievances in London. I suppose for me, the opportunity to reapply elsewhere and potentially get rid of these concerns is a nice thought. But I think that LSE is good enough that there is only a couple of places I'd actually consider going as an alternative, and obviously risking a place at LSE for the mere chance at an alternative could be pretty reckless.

    I know it's something that no one can truely decide but me, so I guess I'm just venting a little haha
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by FCB)
    It was about the course. I actually love London, for me it is the best city in the world, and was a fantastic experience studying there. I'm going to Cambridge for my masters now, but Oxbridge is the only two other places I would like to live/study at other than London. The uni were great, I had asked them what my options were while I was still in the natural science programme, and they fully supported me making a decision that I would be happy with.
    I think I'm probably still unsure about studying in London - it's a big change for me and I know it's not for everyone, but I'm glad to hear that you had a good time there! Great to hear you could make the right choice for you, and well done on Cambridge - good luck!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jneill)
    My thought is "no"

    Universities don't take offence or bear grudges ...

    They expect things like this to happen, they over-offer relative to the number of places with the expectation that some people will withdraw (or miss their offer, or whatever). It's really not a problem.
    I see - that makes a lot of sense.

    As I would still probably reapply, hopefully with a stronger idea of whether I would want to live in London and my course and what not, do you think it would be wise to write a short email to them? Explaining me having to take the gap year, and not wanting to defer to see how my interests develop and such, but saying that I intend to reapply and that I am still passionate about doing well in my studies?

    Obviously nothing is guaranteed, but it could perhaps build up a profile a bit instead of being someone who just randomly dropped out and reapplied?

    Thanks again for your help so far
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by HarryF150)
    I see - that makes a lot of sense.

    As I would still probably reapply, hopefully with a stronger idea of whether I would want to live in London and my course and what not, do you think it would be wise to write a short email to them? Explaining me having to take the gap year, and not wanting to defer to see how my interests develop and such, but saying that I intend to reapply and that I am still passionate about doing well in my studies?

    Obviously nothing is guaranteed, but it could perhaps build up a profile a bit instead of being someone who just randomly dropped out and reapplied?

    Thanks again for your help so far
    Yes. It wouldn't hurt

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jneill)
    Yes. It wouldn't hurt

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Ok - that sounds like a good idea. Thanks very much for all your help!
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?
Applying to uni

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Graduates celebrate

How to write a good personal statement

Expert PS advice from the people who will read it

Uni match

Uni match

Can't decide where to apply? Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Two students working together

A-Z of universities

Read our guides to unis and colleges from around the UK

A student working on a computer

Personal statement help

Use our tool to get your ideal PS quickly!

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student looking down a microscope

Planning open days

Find upcoming open days and get advice on preparing.

Help out other students

These questions still need an answer

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.