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Depression and anxiety: The story of my diagnosis watch

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    Depression and Anxiety
    Mental Health Awareness Week 2016

    Depression and anxiety affect nearly 400,000 young people in the UK alone. According to YoungMinds, that's around 1 in 15 of us that have experienced depression or anxiety. Living with either or both of them can seriously impact day-to-day life.

    TSR is running a campaign all of this week for Mental Health Awareness Week 2016 to promote and inform others of the state of mental health and to try and reduce the stigmas associated with mental health.



    So as part of it being Mental Health Awareness Week, I thought I'd share the story behind my diagnosis of depression and anxiety; I've already shared my story of living with a mental illness at university (my story and those kindly shared by few other users can be found here) but never tale behind the mental illness I live with on a daily basis:

    My story
    As I grew up and went through primary school, I was known by 'Victor Meldrew' from One Foot in Grave (for those of you who aren't old enough to know who he is; he was basically this really grumpy, unhappy old guy) and so even as a child I was 'grumpy' and 'unhappy' but I was never once 'depressed' and I need to stress that distinction

    I moved to secondary school in 2003 (slightly showing my age here :') and the one I attended was a single-sex all boys school. It was here I was really badly bullied; you name the type of bullying, I almost inevitably will have experienced it. I had verbal bullying, physical bullying, emotional bullying and cyber-bullying - I don't need to go into details but it was really bad and although I wasn't ever diagnosed with depression during my time in high school, I'm almost certain if I'd of seen a GP; I would have been because of the type of thoughts I had on a nearly daily basis.

    So we fast forward to the summer of 2012 - I've left high school and sixth-form at this point and in the middle of repairing my A Levels so I could attend university. In July 2012, I planned to see my GP so I could get myself in the best place mentally for attending university in September 2013 but it all came crashing down.

    I had a barrier up that I wasn’t aware of at the time that had stopped the bullying affect my everyday life and I was generally happy. I had started my training to become a Childline volunteer counsellor; I had bought my Leeds festival ticket and I was looking forward to it; I also had the Olympics to look forward to it – albeit it was only football at Wembley but I was going down to see it with a mate of mine from London who I'd known for years but never met. Put bluntly…All of them disappeared in the space of 4 weeks and my barrier came down and I was told I’d fallen into depression or I'd been suffering from a depressive episode. These were quite possibly the hardest four weeks of my life; I was ravaged by dark thoughts daily and they were relentless.

    Anxiety also reared it's lovely (sarcasm ) head in these four weeks; my thoughts told me I had to not talk to anyone and that all my social media had to go, otherwise they wouldn't leave me alone. I'd be constantly on edge and at this time I was struggling to leave my house - I've lived in the same place all my life, so logically I had nothing to be anxious but something psychologically was stopping me from leaving.

    My GP at this time was seeing me every two weeks as they were that concerned about and I was referred for a mental health assessment which was used to gain try and gain an accurate picture of what I was going through at the time and what I had been through in the past and by October of 2012 I was put on Citalopram - which is a front line anti-depressant and is generally used for those suffering from depression and anxiety. This drug was amazing for my anxiety and although I'm no longer I'm on it (because it was useless for the depressive symptoms I had), I put the fact I've not had a panic attack in nearly 3 years down to it.

    So treatments? I eventually changed drugs to Mirtazapine since Citalopram was giving me insomnia and wasn't alleviating the depression side of things, which has helped me sleep (I sleep like a baby once I've taken it ) and made 95% more stable and able to live my life how I'd like and allows me to do things like volunteering for TSR because how stable I actually am! I also had cognitive behavioural therapy - this is a talking therapy which aims to change the way you think and behave and was great for tackling the 'social anxiety' I still had.

    Fast forward to today! I'm at university studying a subject I absolutely love in Psychology; I'm on track to achieve my lifelong dream which to teach; I've achieved things I never thought possible such as running mental health awareness days at my university and I've met some fantastic people along the way!

    I know it's cliché but things really do get better!


    For more information on depression and anxiety (including more treatments that I haven't mentioned), the Mind webpages can be found here: for depression and here: for anxiety.



    If you need some support outside of your friends and family: The Samaritans, Childline and Nightline are also great if you need someone to speak to, and also have email and instant messaging services if you can't or don't want to speak out loud to someone. If you're struggling, your GP is always a good first point of call though!

    Don't be afraid to ask to change GP's if you don't feel as though the one your currently seeing isn't helping you! I changed and it made the world of difference to how I felt because I felt as though someone cared and I wasn't just a 'patient' who they wanted to get out of the door as soon as they could

    We're holding various events and writing about lots of different themes throughout the week. Take a look here!
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    (Original post by Deyesy)
    Depression and Anxiety
    Mental Health Awareness Week 2016

    Depression and anxiety affect nearly 400,000 young people in the UK alone. According to YoungMinds, that's around 1 in 15 of us that have experienced depression or anxiety. Living with either or both of them can seriously impact day-to-day life.

    TSR is running a campaign all of this week for Mental Health Awareness Week 2016 to promote and inform others of the state of mental health and to try and reduce the stigmas associated with mental health.



    So as part of it being Mental Health Awareness Week, I thought I'd share the story behind my diagnosis of depression and anxiety; I've already shared my story of living with a mental illness at university (my story and those kindly shared by few other users can be found here) but never tale behind the mental illness I live with on a daily basis:

    My story
    As I grew up and went through primary school, I was known by 'Victor Meldrew' from One Foot in Grave (for those of you who aren't old enough to know who he is; he was basically this really grumpy, unhappy old guy) and so even as a child I was 'grumpy' and 'unhappy' but I was never once 'depressed' and I need to stress that distinction

    I moved to secondary school in 2003 (slightly showing my age here :') and the one I attended was a single-sex all boys school. It was here I was really badly bullied; you name the type of bullying, I almost inevitably will have experienced it. I had verbal bullying, physical bullying, emotional bullying and cyber-bullying - I don't need to go into details but it was really bad and although I wasn't ever diagnosed with depression during my time in high school, I'm almost certain if I'd of seen a GP; I would have been because of the type of thoughts I had on a nearly daily basis.

    So we fast forward to the summer of 2012 - I've left high school and sixth-form at this point and in the middle of repairing my A Levels so I could attend university. In July 2012, I planned to see my GP so I could get myself in the best place mentally for attending university in September 2013 but it all came crashing down.

    I had a barrier up that I wasn’t aware of at the time that had stopped the bullying affect my everyday life and I was generally happy. I had started my training to become a Childline volunteer counsellor; I had bought my Leeds festival ticket and I was looking forward to it; I also had the Olympics to look forward to it – albeit it was only football at Wembley but I was going down to see it with a mate of mine from London who I'd known for years but never met. Put bluntly…All of them disappeared in the space of 4 weeks and my barrier came down and I was told I’d fallen into depression or I'd been suffering from a depressive episode. These were quite possibly the hardest four weeks of my life; I was ravaged by dark thoughts daily and they were relentless.

    Anxiety also reared it's lovely (sarcasm ) head in these four weeks; my thoughts told me I had to not talk to anyone and that all my social media had to go, otherwise they wouldn't leave me alone. I'd be constantly on edge and at this time I was struggling to leave my house - I've lived in the same place all my life, so logically I had nothing to be anxious but something psychologically was stopping me from leaving.

    My GP at this time was seeing me every two weeks as they were that concerned about and I was referred for a mental health assessment which was used to gain try and gain an accurate picture of what I was going through at the time and what I had been through in the past and by October of 2012 I was put on Citalopram - which is a front line anti-depressant and is generally used for those suffering from depression and anxiety. This drug was amazing for my anxiety and although I'm no longer I'm on it (because it was useless for the depressive symptoms I had), I put the fact I've not had a panic attack in nearly 3 years down to it.

    So treatments? I eventually changed drugs to Mirtazapine since Citalopram was giving me insomnia and wasn't alleviating the depression side of things, which has helped me sleep (I sleep like a baby once I've taken it ) and made 95% more stable and able to live my life how I'd like and allows me to do things like volunteering for TSR because how stable I actually am! I also had cognitive behavioural therapy - this is a talking therapy which aims to change the way you think and behave and was great for tackling the 'social anxiety' I still had.

    Fast forward to today! I'm at university studying a subject I absolutely love in Psychology; I'm on track to achieve my lifelong dream which is to teach; I've achieved things I never thought possible such as running mental health awareness days at my university and I've met some fantastic people along the way!

    I know it's cliché but things really do get better!


    For more information on depression and anxiety (including more treatments that I haven't mentioned), the Mind webpages can be found here: for depression and here: for anxiety.



    If you need some support outside of your friends and family: The Samaritans, Childline and Nightline are also great if you need someone to speak to, and also have email and instant messaging services if you can't or don't want to speak out loud to someone. If you're struggling, your GP is always a good first point of call though!

    Don't be afraid to ask to change GP's if you don't feel as though the one your currently seeing isn't helping you! I changed and it made the world of difference to how I felt because I felt as though someone cared and I wasn't just a 'patient' who they wanted to get out of the door as soon as they could

    We're holding various events and writing about lots of different themes throughout the week. Take a look here!
    Thank you so much for sharing :hugs: you're very brave and very strong, really important and useful info here! :yep:
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    (Original post by iEthan)
    Thank you so much for sharing :hugs: you're very brave and very strong, really important and useful info here! :yep:
    I hope it just shows there's always some light at the end of the tunnel, regardless of how dark it may seem at present
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    (Original post by Deyesy)
    Depression and Anxiety
    Mental Health Awareness Week 2016

    Depression and anxiety affect nearly 400,000 young people in the UK alone. According to YoungMinds, that's around 1 in 15 of us that have experienced depression or anxiety. Living with either or both of them can seriously impact day-to-day life.

    TSR is running a campaign all of this week for Mental Health Awareness Week 2016 to promote and inform others of the state of mental health and to try and reduce the stigmas associated with mental health.



    So as part of it being Mental Health Awareness Week, I thought I'd share the story behind my diagnosis of depression and anxiety; I've already shared my story of living with a mental illness at university (my story and those kindly shared by few other users can be found here) but never tale behind the mental illness I live with on a daily basis:

    My story
    As I grew up and went through primary school, I was known by 'Victor Meldrew' from One Foot in Grave (for those of you who aren't old enough to know who he is; he was basically this really grumpy, unhappy old guy) and so even as a child I was 'grumpy' and 'unhappy' but I was never once 'depressed' and I need to stress that distinction

    I moved to secondary school in 2003 (slightly showing my age here :') and the one I attended was a single-sex all boys school. It was here I was really badly bullied; you name the type of bullying, I almost inevitably will have experienced it. I had verbal bullying, physical bullying, emotional bullying and cyber-bullying - I don't need to go into details but it was really bad and although I wasn't ever diagnosed with depression during my time in high school, I'm almost certain if I'd of seen a GP; I would have been because of the type of thoughts I had on a nearly daily basis.

    So we fast forward to the summer of 2012 - I've left high school and sixth-form at this point and in the middle of repairing my A Levels so I could attend university. In July 2012, I planned to see my GP so I could get myself in the best place mentally for attending university in September 2013 but it all came crashing down.

    I had a barrier up that I wasn’t aware of at the time that had stopped the bullying affect my everyday life and I was generally happy. I had started my training to become a Childline volunteer counsellor; I had bought my Leeds festival ticket and I was looking forward to it; I also had the Olympics to look forward to it – albeit it was only football at Wembley but I was going down to see it with a mate of mine from London who I'd known for years but never met. Put bluntly…All of them disappeared in the space of 4 weeks and my barrier came down and I was told I’d fallen into depression or I'd been suffering from a depressive episode. These were quite possibly the hardest four weeks of my life; I was ravaged by dark thoughts daily and they were relentless.

    Anxiety also reared it's lovely (sarcasm ) head in these four weeks; my thoughts told me I had to not talk to anyone and that all my social media had to go, otherwise they wouldn't leave me alone. I'd be constantly on edge and at this time I was struggling to leave my house - I've lived in the same place all my life, so logically I had nothing to be anxious but something psychologically was stopping me from leaving.

    My GP at this time was seeing me every two weeks as they were that concerned about and I was referred for a mental health assessment which was used to gain try and gain an accurate picture of what I was going through at the time and what I had been through in the past and by October of 2012 I was put on Citalopram - which is a front line anti-depressant and is generally used for those suffering from depression and anxiety. This drug was amazing for my anxiety and although I'm no longer I'm on it (because it was useless for the depressive symptoms I had), I put the fact I've not had a panic attack in nearly 3 years down to it.

    So treatments? I eventually changed drugs to Mirtazapine since Citalopram was giving me insomnia and wasn't alleviating the depression side of things, which has helped me sleep (I sleep like a baby once I've taken it ) and made 95% more stable and able to live my life how I'd like and allows me to do things like volunteering for TSR because how stable I actually am! I also had cognitive behavioural therapy - this is a talking therapy which aims to change the way you think and behave and was great for tackling the 'social anxiety' I still had.

    Fast forward to today! I'm at university studying a subject I absolutely love in Psychology; I'm on track to achieve my lifelong dream which to teach; I've achieved things I never thought possible such as running mental health awareness days at my university and I've met some fantastic people along the way!

    I know it's cliché but things really do get better!


    For more information on depression and anxiety (including more treatments that I haven't mentioned), the Mind webpages can be found here: for depression and here: for anxiety.



    If you need some support outside of your friends and family: The Samaritans, Childline and Nightline are also great if you need someone to speak to, and also have email and instant messaging services if you can't or don't want to speak out loud to someone. If you're struggling, your GP is always a good first point of call though!

    Don't be afraid to ask to change GP's if you don't feel as though the one your currently seeing isn't helping you! I changed and it made the world of difference to how I felt because I felt as though someone cared and I wasn't just a 'patient' who they wanted to get out of the door as soon as they could

    We're holding various events and writing about lots of different themes throughout the week. Take a look here!
    im so proud of you buddy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:hugs:
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    (Original post by scnotcrazy)
    im so proud of you buddy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:hugs:
    Thank you I think the feeling of hope is an such an important feeling and having a dream you can cling on to too. Hope you're doing okay :hugs:
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    (Original post by Deyesy)
    x
    Deyesy firstly although i respected you before i do so even more now :hugs: secondly i think you raise a good point about things getting better and no it isn't cliche. I mean tbh if i didn't believe that i wouldn't bother at all because it wouldn't be worth it. Just holding out until something better comes along
    thank you for sharing this Deyesy :hugs: x
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    (Original post by Deyesy)
    I hope it just shows there's always some light at the end of the tunnel, regardless of how dark it may seem at present
    :sigh: I really needed this right now
    thank you <3 :cry2:
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    (Original post by z33)
    :sigh: I really needed this right now
    thank you <3 :cry2:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Deyesy firstly although i respected you before i do so even more now :hugs: secondly i think you raise a good point about things getting better and no it isn't cliche. I mean tbh if i didn't believe that i wouldn't bother at all because it wouldn't be worth it. Just holding out until something better comes along
    thank you for sharing this Deyesy :hugs: x
    :lovehug:
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Deyesy firstly although i respected you before i do so even more now :hugs: secondly i think you raise a good point about things getting better and no it isn't cliche. I mean tbh if i didn't believe that i wouldn't bother at all because it wouldn't be worth it. Just holding out until something better comes along
    thank you for sharing this Deyesy :hugs: x
    Hope is such an important thing Cavy :hugs:

    (Original post by z33)
    :sigh: I really needed this right now
    thank you <3 :cry2:
    Hope you're okay :hugs: Apologies for how long it's taken me to get around to replying to you
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    (Original post by Deyesy)
    Hope you're okay :hugs: Apologies for how long it's taken me to get around to replying to you
    Well I mean I could be better but I'm alright thank you <3
    Oh no it's okay! Thanks for replying at all xD :hugs:
 
 
 
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