How are viruses killed? B1 Watch

Perfection Ace
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
I understand that antibiotics kill bacteria and that white blood cells can ingest, produce antibodies/antitoxins, but what kills viruses? Also, is a flu a virus? Thank you
0
reply
Appazap
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
the flu as in common cold and such is a virus. I'd like to know how you kill viruses too
1
reply
jeff213
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
viruses are ard to treat as they hide inside cells and are tiny
0
reply
SoDoneWithSchool
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
Isn't there something like antiviral drugs? swear I saw it in the text book
And yes flu is a virus

You doing OCR gateway by any chance?

Edit* just checked, and yes you can stop the virus from reproducing further with antivirals (not kill them)
Perfection Ace
1
reply
IAmAnTroll
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
very hard to kill because they reproduce inside cells

the only way viruses are removed is by the immune system eventually overcoming the virus
0
reply
anosmianAcrimony
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
The flu is a virus. Viruses are a bit different from other pathogens in that they're not properly alive at the best of times. A virus is composed of a protein shell containing a small amount of genetic material, and that's pretty much it - they're orders of magnitude smaller than normal cells or even bacteria. They reproduce by entering an organism's cells and using our cellular machinery to transcribe their genetic material and make more viruses, and because they can't reproduce without the help of another organism, they're not usually considered alive.

Viruses are too small for immune cells to detect and ingest, so the immune system's main defence against them is to detect and kill virally infected cells, preventing them from reproducing. Antiviral medications have only been developed relatively recently, but even those don't truly kill viruses - they just disrupt their life cycle by preventing the viruses from entering cells or interacting with our cellular machinery.
1
reply
Perfection Ace
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#7
Thank you everyone!!! Although it's not in my AQA spec, I was just curious on how viruses are killed. Thanks everyone and good luck to those who have the exam tomorrow!!
0
reply
FCB
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
(Original post by Perfection Ace)
Thank you everyone!!! Although it's not in my AQA spec, I was just curious on how viruses are killed. Thanks everyone and good luck to those who have the exam tomorrow!!
Viruses are not technically alive, as others have mentioned. They cannot reproduce on their own, and do not metabolise. They are at best biologically active bundles of DNA/RNA assorted proteins.

Your immune cells (B-cells) release anti-bodies which are specific for that given virus. Anti-bodies can be in different formations, and some of them help bundle viral particles up together.

This probably goes way beyond the scope of A-level Biology, but if you're interested i'll give a bit more information.

You have a special immune cell called a T cell. When these get going, they will go around telling other parts of your immune system to target the specific protein that is causing the immune response, in this case the virus. From here the B-cells are activated for this protein, and release the specific anti-bodies required (this is the humoral immune response). The T cells don't stop working however, some of them go around with special receptors specific for that viruses proteins, and will kill any of your own cells which are showing signs of being victim to that viruses invasion (viral proteins on the cell surface). This causes temporary destruction of tissue, but it prevents the viral infection from spreading/multiplying. This is the cell-mediated immune response.

Like I said, this is quite an in-depth topic, and I've barely even glossed over the details. If it's something you're interested in, then it would be covered in the second/third years of university course,
1
reply
Perfection Ace
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by FCB)
Viruses are not technically alive, as others have mentioned. They cannot reproduce on their own, and do not metabolise. They are at best biologically active bundles of DNA/RNA assorted proteins.

Your immune cells (B-cells) release anti-bodies which are specific for that given virus. Anti-bodies can be in different formations, and some of them help bundle viral particles up together.

This probably goes way beyond the scope of A-level Biology, but if you're interested i'll give a bit more information.

You have a special immune cell called a T cell. When these get going, they will go around telling other parts of your immune system to target the specific protein that is causing the immune response, in this case the virus. From here the B-cells are activated for this protein, and release the specific anti-bodies required (this is the humoral immune response). The T cells don't stop working however, some of them go around with special receptors specific for that viruses proteins, and will kill any of your own cells which are showing signs of being victim to that viruses invasion (viral proteins on the cell surface). This causes temporary destruction of tissue, but it prevents the viral infection from spreading/multiplying. This is the cell-mediated immune response.

Like I said, this is quite an in-depth topic, and I've barely even glossed over the details. If it's something you're interested in, then it would be covered in the second/third years of university course,
Thanks! Wow, that sounds really really interesting! I've picked Biology as an A level subject as I hoped to go more 'deep' into the topics but it really does sound fascinating! I can't wait for September!!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Bath
    Undergraduate Virtual Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 23 Feb '19
  • Ravensbourne University London
    School of Design, School of Media Further education
    Sat, 23 Feb '19
  • Leeds Trinity University
    PGCE Open Day Further education
    Sat, 23 Feb '19

Is the plastic tax enough to protect the environment?

Yes (14)
5.91%
No (223)
94.09%

Watched Threads

View All