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45 Refugee shelters burnt down since January, Germany watch

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    So that's 9 shelters a month, with 80% of the assailants being male and all being from the surrounding area of the attack. The shelters would generally be privately owned businesses like hotels that get renovated without consulting the community, as the owners can make more money off government contracts, ironically being payed by the same taxes of the people who would object.

    Head of the German Federal Criminal Police said; there is no indication of a formal organisation, it appears all of the attacks are locals acting out of anger. Also adding that the tempo of the attacks is increasing.

    He went on to say that they, the police, are now prosecuting 'verbal violence' on the internet about the refugees. With some 3,000 cases being perused from 2015 alone. Sounds dangerously close to a return to fascism.

    Is this justified, the people from the surrounding areas clearly don't want asylum centers put up in their areas and nobody voted to allow so many into their country.

    When democracy fails to represent the views of the population is violence of this sort justified, considering the government has take an autocratic approach to an issue that will impact everyone directly for generations to come. Would you rather live in a democracy or with 'refugees'. Because it seems like we can't have both, ironically, much to the delight of many of the refugees who would like to see democracy ended.

    http://www.augsburger-allgemeine.de/...d37771382.html
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    This is inevitable in my opinion
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    Maybe if enough are burned down, owners will stop allowing their premises for being used as shelters. Anti-democratic actions in a western country will naturally lead to this.
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    It is the same tactic the German far right used in the 90s against Turkish immigrants. Several people were burnt alive.

    I know those on the right like to bleat on about the superiority European culture through their rose tinted spectacles, but it becomes a difficult argument to maintain if Europeans are setting fire to their own buildings and placing people's lives at risk.
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    (Original post by Quantex)
    It is the same tactic the German far right used in the 90s against Turkish immigrants. Several people were burnt alive.

    I know those on the right like to bleat on about the superiority European culture through their rose tinted spectacles, but it becomes a difficult argument to maintain if Europeans are setting fire to their own buildings and placing people's lives at risk.
    Got a link, surely the Turks weren't arriving as refugees nor in need of 'shelters' provided by the state.

    How can a none EU citizen claim benefits or even travel to an EU country legally with no means to support themselves and without claiming asylum. Sorry about the questions, curious bees me.

    Also, attacking undemocratic decisions and representations of them in society is surely an important thing, is it not ? Democracy doesn't mean much if these monuments to authoritarianism are allowed to stand, in full view of everyone no less.

    It runs much deeper than people being worried about their immediate safety, I think, what these centers say to every German person that looks upon them is; "it doesn't matter what the people want, democracy is dead". I quite like that, 'monuments to authoritarianism'. That's what they are though.
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    (Original post by HanSoloLuck)
    Got a link, surely the Turks weren't arriving as refugees nor in need of 'shelters' provided by the state.
    Similar situation actually. Some Germans weren't happy with the numbers of asylum seekers and Turkish migrant workers arriving in the country so decided to take matters into their own hands. There were multiple attacks and incidents of arson over a couple of years. The worst being the Solingen attack in which 5 women and children died.

    http://www.nytimes.com/1993/06/04/wo...ain-turks.html

    The response among both Germans and Turks was anger and led to serious concerns about the re-emergence of the far right within Germany. I do wonder to what extent such violent incidents led to the adoption of multiculturalism within the European political mainstream.

    How can a none EU citizen claim benefits or even travel to an EU country legally with no means to support themselves and without claiming asylum. Sorry about the questions, curious bees me.

    Also, attacking undemocratic decisions and representations of them in society is surely an important thing, is it not ? Democracy doesn't mean much if these monuments to authoritarianism are allowed to stand, in full view of everyone no less.

    It runs much deeper than people being worried about their immediate safety, I think, what these centers say to every German person that looks upon them is; "it doesn't matter what the people want, democracy is dead". I quite like that, 'monuments to authoritarianism'. That's what they are though.
    Unfortunately the term authoritarianism is, like fascism, widely thrown around on the internet in a way that seriously dilutes it. Letting migrants or refugees into the country is not undemocratic or authoritarian. If the German people object so strongly to those politicians responsible for their recent policies on immigration, then they can vote them of office. It may happen. Although the major anti-immigration party, the AfD, are about as popular as the Greens, so really have their work cut out before the upcoming federal elections.
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    (Original post by Quantex)


    Unfortunately the term authoritarianism is, like fascism, widely thrown around on the internet in a way that seriously dilutes it. Letting migrants or refugees into the country is not undemocratic or authoritarian. If the German people object so strongly to those politicians responsible for their recent policies on immigration, then they can vote them of office. It may happen. Although the major anti-immigration party, the AfD, are about as popular as the Greens, so really have their work cut out before the upcoming federal elections.
    Granted, but should her position as a representative of German people not reflect popular German opinion and be promoting German interests.

    She is forcing her will, or the will of a minority, on the majority. Using her position of power to do something that has a direct cost/risk to the people she is suppose to be protecting for her own reasons. She is not suppose to be representing herself, but the German people.

    Is this not authoritarianism ?
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    They're resisting engineered White genocide

    Thank you Merkel in behalf of the Jewish people for helping aiding European genocide
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    Why are you referring to them as refugees? People who move between safe and stable countries for economic reasons are termed economic migrants. Since these people fit that description they are economic migrants
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    It's only a matter of time before people start to fight back against the invasion

    Those in charge were warned
 
 
 
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