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    I have arthritis in my left ankle, and I have been accepted for diagnostic radiography.

    My worry is though, will I be failed at the occupational health assessment? Has anyone else had experience of having joint/mobility issues and working in the NHS?
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    You won't fail the occupational health assessment. You'll struggle on placement if you can't stand up and walk around all day though.
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    (Original post by FXX)
    You won't fail the occupational health assessment. You'll struggle on placement if you can't stand up and walk around all day though.
    Ok.....

    When I did my 1st degree, I walked 3.2 miles to uni and back. When I left my home, I did not stop until i got to uni, and vice versa. Only time I DID stop? For traffic lights. Tbh, I find I struggle after sitting down for a long time, a bit stiff, too begin with then it eases off. Standing up not moving around? Thats a bit tough on me. But moving around? Thats fine!

    How does that sound.....?

    (honestly)
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    (Original post by hiu)
    Ok.....

    When I did my 1st degree, I walked 3.2 miles to uni and back. When I left my home, I did not stop until i got to uni, and vice versa. Only time I DID stop? For traffic lights. Tbh, I find I struggle after sitting down for a long time, a bit stiff, too begin with then it eases off. Standing up not moving around? Thats a bit tough on me. But moving around? Thats fine!

    How does that sound.....?

    (honestly)
    Hard to say as everyone is different. I assumed it was quite serious if you were worried you wouldn't be allowed on the course for it. How much moving around you do depends on where you're working. But until you do it, you won't know.

    I still get sore feet after a busy day and I've been doing it for 7 years.
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    (Original post by FXX)
    Hard to say as everyone is different. I assumed it was quite serious if you were worried you wouldn't be allowed on the course for it. How much moving around you do depends on where you're working. But until you do it, you won't know.

    I still get sore feet after a busy day and I've been doing it for 7 years.
    Well I have to get surgery (well, thats my only option at this point, ankle fusion , but I can manage with non-conservative methods at the mo, and have for 11 years! )But despite the severity etc, I can still walk about and manage stairs no problem, not out of breath or anything

    Dont need to answer if Im being too forward/intrusive but, do you have any....muscloskeletal issues?
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    (Original post by hiu)
    Well I have to get surgery (well, thats my only option at this point, ankle fusion , but I can manage with non-conservative methods at the mo, and have for 11 years! )But despite the severity etc, I can still walk about and manage stairs no problem, not out of breath or anything

    Dont need to answer if Im being too forward/intrusive but, do you have any....muscloskeletal issues?
    No I don't, but walking about for 16 hours straight will take it out of you, I don't care who you are.
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    (Original post by FXX)
    No I don't, but walking about for 16 hours straight will take it out of you, I don't care who you are.
    Damn 16 hours?

    Thought it was 37.5 hours per week....?

    Wasnt trying to be offensive about asking you btw or doubting your credentials, was just interested how healthcare people coped with

    Anyway, thank you for replying much appreciated

    xx
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    (Original post by hiu)
    Damn 16 hours?

    Thought it was 37.5 hours per week....?

    Wasnt trying to be offensive about asking you btw or doubting your credentials, was just interested how healthcare people coped with
    I work in a hospital that still has an on call system, meaning the 37.5 hours covers the days, but the nights and weekends are covered on top. This kind of working is uncommon now but depending on where you specialise later on in your career, you may find yourself working a 12 hour day, and then a few hours at the end/overnight to cover emergencies in your specialty.

    This can of course all be avoided, and won't affect you as a student.
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    (Original post by FXX)
    I work in a hospital that still has an on call system, meaning the 37.5 hours covers the days, but the nights and weekends are covered on top. This kind of working is uncommon now but depending on where you specialise later on in your career, you may find yourself working a 12 hour day, and then a few hours at the end/overnight to cover emergencies in your specialty.
    Does columbo impersonation:

    "Just one more question...."

    Would there be any chance of a DR working primarily night shift?
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    (Original post by hiu)
    Does columbo impersonation:

    "Just one more question...."

    Would there be any chance of a DR working primarily night shift?
    I believe there are some hospitals that employ full time night shift radiographers, but the vast majority have a rotation as you are required to keep your skills up in all areas of radiography. By sticking to nights you would be avoiding a lot of the boring parts of the job.
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    (Original post by FXX)
    I believe there are some hospitals that employ full time night shift radiographers, but the vast majority have a rotation as you are required to keep your skills up in all areas of radiography. By sticking to nights you would be avoiding a lot of the boring parts of the job.
    coughs and lot less demand for us (so I am told!)

    So a radiographer (and I am so sorry for being pedantic, feel like the riddler on crack here, sorry ) but if a DR DID work full time night shift, would they be disavantaged? Atrophy career wise? Ideally wanting to move up the ladder as soon as I can, senior post and all that
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    (Original post by hiu)
    coughs and lot less demand for us (so I am told!)

    So a radiographer (and I am so sorry for being pedantic, feel like the riddler on crack here, sorry ) but if a DR DID work full time night shift, would they be disavantaged? Atrophy career wise? Ideally wanting to move up the ladder as soon as I can, senior post and all that
    Again depends where you work. The nights can be variable. If it's quiet, the time will drag and you'll want to shoot yourself. If it's busy, it's core staff only and you'll be running ragged, and your workload management will be tested to the limit.

    If you want career progression, you would not want to be a full time night shift radiographer. Training is only done in hours and all of the 'senior' work is done in the daytime. Night shifts are about taking pictures and nothing else (pretty much). Again, these posts are rare anyway, so it's unlikely to be a decision you have to make for yourself.
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    (Original post by FXX)
    Again depends where you work. The nights can be variable. If it's quiet, the time will drag and you'll want to shoot yourself. If it's busy, it's core staff only and you'll be running ragged, and your workload management will be tested to the limit.

    If you want career progression, you would not want to be a full time night shift radiographer. Training is only done in hours and all of the 'senior' work is done in the daytime. Night shifts are about taking pictures and nothing else (pretty much). Again, these posts are rare anyway, so it's unlikely to be a decision you have to make for yourself.
    Whatever gets me up the ladder

    And financing my surgery

    Seriously, thanks a lot
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    (Original post by hiu)
    Whatever gets me up the ladder

    And financing my surgery

    Seriously, thanks a lot
    No problem.

    If you want extra pennies, specialise in ultrasound and do agency work. MRI is good too if ultrasound doesn't appeal. You can do agency work on your days off and the pay is very good. Some hospitals run extra lists which are paid at a decent overtime rate (each patient that breaches the waiting time limit triggers a fine of £2000, so the rates have to be attractive enough to guarantee someone will do them, as they are still cheaper than the fines). Takes a lot of work to get there but pays off. Nights are not where the money is.
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    (Original post by FXX)
    No problem.

    If you want extra pennies, specialise in ultrasound and do agency work. MRI is good too if ultrasound doesn't appeal. You can do agency work on your days off and the pay is very good. Some hospitals run extra lists which are paid at a decent overtime rate (each patient that breaches the waiting time limit triggers a fine of £2000, so the rates have to be attractive enough to guarantee someone will do them, as they are still cheaper than the fines). Takes a lot of work to get there but pays off. Nights are not where the money is.
    Magic, absolutely magic. Thank you thank you thank you thank you
 
 
 
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