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    sorry to interrupt the maths but i was just wondering whether anyone is planning to take a TV with them...
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    (Original post by scarlet ibis)
    sorry to interrupt the maths but i was just wondering whether anyone is planning to take a TV with them...
    I'm not. For me, TV comes after PC. Since I'm not taking my PC with me, TV is definitely a no no.
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    Yes! Maths plz.
    Alright, I'll dig out one question just for you.
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    (Original post by scarlet ibis)
    sorry to interrupt the maths but i was just wondering whether anyone is planning to take a TV with them...
    I am, but just to watch videos on - I don't have an ariel and I don't want to have to pay a license...unless you have to pay a license even if you don't watch the broadcast channels...I'm completely clueless... :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Camford)
    Alright, I'll dig out one question just for you.
    Cheers.
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    (Original post by Fluffstar)
    I am, but just to watch videos on - I don't have an ariel and I don't want to have to pay a license...unless you have to pay a license even if you don't watch the broadcast channels...I'm completely clueless... :rolleyes:
    Nope, you dont need a licence if ur not getting any of the broadcasting channels.....though, like every1 else, you'll still receive the complimentary hassling letter from the Licencing people, demanding you pay or else :rolleyes:

    What you want is one of those new tv combos, with a DVD player in then u'll instantly become a shining beacon for other students to be drawn towards!
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    Here's a puzzle my Physics teacher gave us a long time ago:

    "Someone once challenged me to work out the ages of his three children. As a rather strange coincidence, all of his children had the same birthday, although not all in the same year. He was quite proud of this fact. He gave me three clues and said I would need all of them to work it out, but that he need not give me any further information:

    Clue 1: The product of my children's ages is 36
    Clue 2: The sum of their ages is equal to the door number of the house opposite mine
    Clue 3: My eldest child is learning the piano"


    I'm not planning on taking a TV...I really don't think I'll have much time to watch it, but there are TV rooms around the place.
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    Hm

    factor pairs of 36:

    2,18
    3,12
    4,9
    6,6

    only 2, 18 works, it breaks down in ages 2,3,6

    any other combinations involve repeated factors.

    But this doesn't use all of the clues!
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    squishy does that question have a definite answer!

    and camford...you're doing compsci and not taking a computer!!!???
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    Hm

    factor pairs of 36:

    2,18
    3,12
    4,9
    6,6

    only 2, 18 works, it breaks down in ages 2,3,6

    any other combinations involve repeated factors.

    But this doesn't use all of the clues!

    you forgot one of the children could be aged 1
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    (Original post by Willa)
    you forgot one of the children could be aged 1
    Oh bugger!

    yeah they could be 1,3,12
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    (Original post by Fluffstar)
    - lol I only have a C in P3 my freind...
    Well I got a good A... Bring it on..
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    alex, are you actually going to eat a hat.....do we get to see this event take place in cambridge?
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    Oh bugger!

    yeah they could be 1,3,12
    or 9,4 and 1,
    18, 2 and 1

    lots of possibilitys


    could have twins! (then you can have repeated roots)
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    (Original post by Willa)
    alex, are you actually going to eat a hat.....do we get to see this event take place in cambridge?
    I will. I promised to do it on webcam for UKL. We could do it at one of the parties if you want
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    First thing about this question, I'm not expecting anyone to give me answer. To be frank, I've not got a clue how to work it out. In fact, it may require something we will probably be doing in the university. So, if you think this is a good question, then make a note of it. Give it another attempt when you have finished your 1st year. Here it is.

    This is something I noticed a while back when I was working in a packing room in a sausage factory. In the room there are some conveyer belt and a few rolls of industrial cling film. We all know that conveyer belt move at the same set speed. So, if you drop something on top of it, it'll get carried down the belt with a constant speed. Now consider dropping a roll of cling film on to the belt so that it would roll in a direction parallel to that of the belt, given that the roll is sufficiently thin, i.e. the film left on it has a sickness of about 2 cm, core included. The observation was rather interesting. Inmediately after came into contact with the belt, the roll picked up speed and reached a speed which is higher than that of the belt and rolled "up stream" to a position which is, say, S metres (less than a metre, I'd say about 30 cm. But it depends on the roll you use.) away from the dropping position. After a while, the roll had lost most of it's k.e. and slowed down to almost stationary, i.e. not rolling anymore. It got carried "down stream" by the belt to a point which approximately S away from the dropping position (Mid point). Once there, the roll picked up speed again and rolled up stream and passed the mid point. And the same thing repeated itself over and over. Eventually, the roll settled down and seems to roll at the mid point. Notice the similarities between this and damped oscillation.

    My question for all the people who's interested in this is: Can you find a differential equation or a general equation to discribe this?

    Disclaimer: More experiment may be needed before conclusion can be made. I only had very limited time to do this since I was working there.

    Gosh, that sounds like the pancake tossing problem them people solved. Anyone will be solving this for their 3rd year project?
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    yes i'll sort something out with a live webcast or something!
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    I got a low B in A2 maths so

    I was gutted though, as I spent most of my revision time on it.
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    (Original post by Camford)
    First thing about this question, I'm not expecting anyone to give me answer. To be frank, I've not got a clue how to work it out. In fact, it may require something we will probably be doing in the university. So, if you think this is a good question, then make a note of it. Give it another attempt when you have finished your 1st year. Here it is.

    This is something I noticed a while back when I was working in a packing room in a sausage factory. In the room there are some conveyer belt and a few rolls of industrial cling film. We all know that conveyer belt move at the same set speed. So, if you drop something on top of it, it'll get carried down the belt with a constant speed. Now consider dropping a roll of cling film on to the belt so that it would roll in a direction parallel to that of the belt, given that the roll is sufficiently thin, i.e. the film left on it has a sickness of about 2 cm, core included. The observation was rather interesting. Inmediately after came into contact with the belt, the roll picked up speed and reached a speed which is higher than that of the belt and rolled "up stream" to a position which is, say, S metres (less than a metre, I'd say about 30 cm. But it depends on the roll you use.) away from the dropping position. After a while, the roll had lost most of it's k.e. and slowed down to almost stationary, i.e. not rolling anymore. It got carried "down stream" by the belt to a point which approximately S away from the dropping position (Mid point). Once there, the roll picked up speed again and rolled up stream and passed the mid point. And the same thing repeated itself over and over. Eventually, the roll settled down and seems to roll at the mid point. Notice the similarities between this and damped oscillation.

    My question for all the people who's interested in this is: Can you find a differential equation or a general equation to discribe this?

    Disclaimer: More experiment may be needed before conclusion can be made. I only had very limited time to do this since I was working there.

    Gosh, that sounds like the pancake tossing problem them people solved. Anyone will be solving this for their 3rd year project?
    Wow this is really interesting. Can't really comment on in though. *waits for somebody more informed to say something*
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    (Original post by Willa)
    yes i'll sort something out with a live webcast or something!
    Sweet
 
 
 
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