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    (Original post by gzftan)
    Oh dear god!!! *counts fingers* 1 ,2 ,3,4,5.....1,2,3,4,5....phew.... thank the gods!!!

    G
    If you have ten fingers that means you have two more than most people (I have eight and two thumbs, personally...

    Someone nip off G's nads with an elastic band please..
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    (Original post by polthegael)
    If you have ten fingers that means you have two more than most people (I have eight and two thumbs, personally...

    Someone nip off G's nads with an elastic band please..
    Ah...pedant!

    G
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    (Original post by gzftan)
    Ah...pedant!
    Pedant, AND PROUD!
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    (Original post by polthegael)
    Pedant, AND PROUD!
    Lol....perfectionist sounds better than pedant!

    G
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    Pedantry is a noble profession if you ask me.
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    (Original post by gzftan)
    Lol....perfectionist sounds better than pedant!
    And what about a pedantic perfectionist..? :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by MadNatSci)
    Pedantry is a noble profession if you ask me.

    (Original post by MadNatSci)
    Pedantry is a noble profession if you ask me.
    nicky, why are you never on msn when i need to ask your sage advice about cambridge, damn you?!
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    (Original post by MadNatSci)
    Pedantry is a noble profession if you ask me.
    PERFECTIONISM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    G
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    (Original post by gzftan)
    PERFECTIONISM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    G
    Sorry..i'm being pedantic now

    G
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    (Original post by MadNatSci)
    Pedantry is a noble profession if you ask me.

    You can always tell who's a bloody scientist.

    MB
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    (Original post by musicboy)
    You can always tell who's a bloody scientist.
    Is that a slight at medics..? :mad:
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    (Original post by polthegael)
    Is that a slight at medics..? :mad:

    it can be if you want

    MB
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    (Original post by musicboy)
    it can be if you want
    Helen.. Will you tell him! (It'll help get you into the whole parenting thing..!)
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    Just to refresh your memory on that so called brick wall maths Q I set yesterday.

    The two sequences of numbers I mentioned seem to obey the same general equation only with different starting point. A hint to answering this question is to consider the structure of triangle number.

    Any given triangle number can be described by T= n(n+1)/2. For T to be a square number, either: 1, n is square and (n+1)/2 is square; or 2, n/2 is square, and (n+1) is square (or n = (n+1)/2, which solves to n = 1). This is really all you need to find these two sequences of number I mentioned before. But, the method my friend and I used to get there wasn't a pretty one. And we didn't know how to argue that we didn't actually miss out on anything.

    Anyway, hope the hint will trigger a torrent of thoughts.
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    (Original post by Camford)

    Any given triangle number can be described by T= n(n+1)/2. For T to be a square number, either: 1, n is square and (n+1)/2 is square; or 2, n/2 is square, and (n+1) is square (or n = (n+1)/2, which solves to n = 1). This is really all you need to find these two sequences of number I mentioned before. But, the method my friend and I used to get there wasn't a pretty one. And we didn't know how to argue that we didn't actually miss out on anything.

    Anyway, hope the hint will trigger a torrent of thoughts.
    I'm a historian, so I'll just say... :eek: wtf's that monster? yarrg :eek:
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    (Original post by Counterpoint)
    I'm a historian, so I'll just say... :eek: wtf's that monster? yarrg :eek:
    *Camford shakes his head and says to himself "wtf (why) did I bother."*
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    (Original post by Camford)
    *Camford shakes his head and says to himself "wtf (why) did I bother."*
    hehehe. believe me, had i any mathematical ability i would have taken it, probably even as a degree. it's the one blot in the story of my life; the inability to think mathematically. a very respectful course nonetheless, beaten only by medicine and maybe a science or two .
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    (Original post by Camford)
    Just to refresh your memory on that so called brick wall maths Q I set yesterday.

    The two sequences of numbers I mentioned seem to obey the same general equation only with different starting point. A hint to answering this question is to consider the structure of triangle number.

    Any given triangle number can be described by T= n(n+1)/2. For T to be a square number, either: 1, n is square and (n+1)/2 is square; or 2, n/2 is square, and (n+1) is square (or n = (n+1)/2, which solves to n = 1). This is really all you need to find these two sequences of number I mentioned before. But, the method my friend and I used to get there wasn't a pretty one. And we didn't know how to argue that we didn't actually miss out on anything.

    Anyway, hope the hint will trigger a torrent of thoughts.
    Are you sure that's a necessary condition for t to be a square?

    16 is a square, but neither 8 or 2 are squares.

    I'm missing something here lol.
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    Are you sure that's a necessary condition for t to be a square?

    16 is a square, but neither 8 or 2 are squares.

    I'm missing something here lol.
    That's why I said I probably missed out on something. From what I remember, the first few numbers in the sequeneces we found gave every number that fit the criteria without missing anything out.

    I'll spend sometime on it and see what I can come up with.
 
 
 

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