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    (Original post by priya)
    scuse me?! i happen to think smirnoff ice is a very nice drink! yeah i'm lightweight i know, but that's what i like, so deal with it
    :rolleyes: Unfortunately, you seem to fall into a rather large category of ppl, namely the female/feminine section of Cambridge!! :rolleyes: No matter, all the more amusing when u still get pissed...on Lambrini or whateva the wine substitute is these days
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    (Original post by musicboy)
    yes, a nice drink that rots children's teeth.

    MB
    it's all alcohol, it's all full of sugar.
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    (Original post by MadLy)
    :rolleyes: Unfortunately, you seem to fall into a rather large category of ppl, namely the female/feminine section of Cambridge!! :rolleyes: No matter, all the more amusing when u still get pissed...on Lambrini or whateva the wine substitute is these days
    hmmm there's a reason why i fall into the female section of Cambridge!

    it's not my fault totally that i'm a lightweight...family don't drink (much), and since i've been driving i've become more lightweight because i'd drive to 18th birthday parties/the pub etc
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    (Original post by priya)
    it's all alcohol, it's all full of sugar.
    TBH it's sh*t. I've never had it and I know it's sh*t. Just drink something sensible like a pint (or a quart).

    MB

    [QUOTE=Katie J]
    I think it's understandable to be pleased the child is deaf, it means they can communicate with them, I can't imagine how hard it must be to not be able to do so with your kids! QUOTE]

    well, if you are the hearing child of deaf parents who sign you would almost certainly learn to sign fluently as well - it might even be your first language. your baby wouldn't have to be deaf to be able to use BSL and communicate with you in that way.
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    (Original post by musicboy)
    TBH it's sh*t. I've never had it and I know it's sh*t. Just drink something sensible like a pint (or a quart).

    MB
    therefore you're not qualified to say it's sh*t

    pints....hmm...taste like putrified water
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    (Original post by priya)
    hmmm there's a reason why i fall into the female section of Cambridge!

    it's not my fault totally that i'm a lightweight...family don't drink (much), and since i've been driving i've become more lightweight because i'd drive to 18th birthday parties/the pub etc
    Okay...I'll take ur word fer it

    Lightweightedness is obviously what you go to uni to cure! And thats also another excuse why I havent gone and taken a driving test yet.....so many people with cars already and space in the back....

    (Original post by priya)
    the hearing child would pick up speech at school, but because speech wouldn't be normal for her at home, whereas it is for us, he/she would be slow to learn it. children always pick up language first from their parents, as for the child's first two years he/she wouldn't be with anyone else
    not true - almost every kid has babysitters, playgroup, family, mum and dad's friends etc.. and if you were deaf parents with a hearing child and you wanted to try and minimise the extent to which his/her language would be affected surely you would try and maximise the opportunities the child had to encounter speech by putting him/her in a playgroup etc.

    children who grow up speaking another language to english usually turn out fine - I know it's a bit different because it's not spoken - but they would still be exposed to TV, radiom, other people etc even if their parents were completely non-verbal.
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    (Original post by crana)
    well, if you are the hearing child of deaf parents who sign you would almost certainly learn to sign fluently as well - it might even be your first language. your baby wouldn't have to be deaf to be able to use BSL and communicate with you in that way.

    of course you'd learn sign but not like your parents. The problem is that BSL is based on english and doesn't have independant grammar. In fact, BSL grammar isn't really set in any way. It has of course, got some traits of being an independant language such as regional dialect (there are nine ways of saying holiday depending on where youy come from), but users base much of it on English. A child cannot do this and therefore BSL doesn't qute work in the same way.

    MB
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    (Original post by crana)
    not true - almost every kid has babysitters, playgroup, family, mum and dad's friends etc.. and if you were deaf parents with a hearing child and you wanted to try and minimise the extent to which his/her language would be affected surely you would try and maximise the opportunities the child had to encounter speech by putting him/her in a playgroup etc.

    children who grow up speaking another language to english usually turn out fine - I know it's a bit different because it's not spoken - but they would still be exposed to TV, radiom, other people etc even if their parents were completely non-verbal.
    i suppose so yeah. the thing is kids who speak another language are at least using their vocal chords, learning to how to make sound from them. the hearing child in this instance wouldn't learn that as quickly if the parents were the main ones to bring it up (the others being childminders etc, all the people you mentioned)

    (Original post by musicboy)
    of course you'd learn sign but not like your parents. The problem is that BSL is based on english and doesn't have independant grammar. In fact, BSL grammar isn't really set in any way. It has of course, got some traits of being an independant language such as regional dialect (there are nine ways of saying holiday depending on where youy come from), but users base much of it on English. A child cannot do this and therefore BSL doesn't qute work in the same way.

    MB
    I don't really understand what you mean... sorry.

    What about a completely deaf child who learnt sign from being a baby? How would that be different really from a hearing child with deaf parents who learnt sign from being a baby, with relation to what you say about independent grammar etc?
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    I think the other problem with the case is the issue of the "big D Deaf" and "little d deaf" communities (Deaf people tend to have been Deaf all their life and have BSL as a first language whereas deaf people generally have some other communication). The Deaf community has traditionaly been quite puritanical and has looked down on the deaf community.

    MB

    (Original post by priya)
    i suppose so yeah. the thing is kids who speak another language are at least using their vocal chords, learning to how to make sound from them. the hearing child in this instance wouldn't learn that as quickly if the parents were the main ones to bring it up (the others being childminders etc, all the people you mentioned)
    I don't personally know any hearing babies of deaf parents but I bet they sing along with barney videos and all the rest of it just the same (for exercising their vocal chords).

    anyway, even if they were slightly slower to figure out how to use their vocal chords, they would have all the advantages of being bilingual..
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    (Original post by crana)
    I don't really understand what you mean... sorry.

    What about a completely deaf child who learnt sign from being a baby? How would that be different really from a hearing child with deaf parents who learnt sign from being a baby, with relation to what you say about independent grammar etc?

    Because most Deaf children don't have signing parents. with the mixture of heard language and BSL it could ruin their linguistic understanding.,

    MB

    (Original post by musicboy)
    Because most Deaf children don't have signing parents. with the mixture of heard language and BSL it could ruin their linguistic understanding.,

    MB
    have you got any evidence for this? it seems very odd to me. children cope with having 2 different languages pretty well, and some babies (completely hearing, of hearing parents) are being taught signs now before they are able to talk to help enhance their eventual linguistic abilities..

    plus some children with learning difficulties use signs (ok, not usually BSL) together with heard language to help improve their communication abilities and understanding. you wouldn't think they would teach them the signs if the combination of both would destroy their linguistic understanding, especially as these kids would have much more problems with lingistic understanding anyway..

    and what about kids who are Deaf but are still exposed to both BSL & heard language? after all lots of kids can hear quite a lot with their hearing aids but are likely to still be exposed to BSL..
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    (Original post by crana)
    have you got any evidence for this? it seems very odd to me. children cope with having 2 different languages pretty well, and some babies (completely hearing, of hearing parents) are being taught signs now before they are able to talk to help enhance their eventual linguistic abilities..

    plus some children with learning difficulties use signs (ok, not usually BSL) together with heard language to help improve their communication abilities and understanding. you wouldn't think they would teach them the signs if the combination of both would destroy their linguistic understanding, especially as these kids would have much more problems with lingistic understanding anyway..

    and what about kids who are Deaf but are still exposed to both BSL & heard language? after all lots of kids can hear quite a lot with their hearing aids but are likely to still be exposed to BSL..

    well a oldd friend of mine (yes I know this is only one ccase) wwas hearing but had deaf parents. He couldn't really communicate with hiss parents that well until he had learnt english. This is really because a lot of BSL is based on initials of words and a lot of thee signs are the same and rely on context,


    MB

    (Original post by musicboy)
    well a oldd friend of mine (yes I know this is only one ccase) wwas hearing but had deaf parents. He couldn't really communicate with hiss parents that well until he had learnt english. This is really because a lot of BSL is based on initials of words and a lot of thee signs are the same and rely on context,


    MB
    what about the kids who are born deaf and have BSL as their first language..? i understand they normally have somewhat delayed linguistic processing, but often BSL is their first language and they don't really learn english until a bit later on..?
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    (Original post by crana)
    what about the kids who are born deaf and have BSL as their first language..? i understand they normally have somewhat delayed linguistic processing, but often BSL is their first language and they don't really learn english until a bit later on..?
    i'm too tired to argue now - i'll talk in the morning

    MB

    (Original post by musicboy)
    i'm too tired to argue now - i'll talk in the morning

    MB
    im not tryimng to argue! im just confused!

    im just getting some stuff sorted out and was wondering (natsci.. but anyone)

    what kind of stationary-stuff will I need? I have liberated 3 rather nice lever arches so far by chucking away old stuff.. I was thinking 4 for 4 modules..? and perhaps little ones for "current" work or whatever and then put them in the leverarches later ? (thats what i did at school, nayway)

    Is there any point me bringing A-level notes/revision guides/etc? (I might bring some random school-haven't-noticed-theyre-missing textbooks.. but would I ever use my notes etc?)

    can you think of stuff Id need not onn my list (its a funny thing, i get all compulsive in the small hours)

    Leverarch x 4
    Ringbinder x 4
    Sticky labels (I can't live without them..)
    Holepunch
    Stapler
    Printer paper & spare ink cartridges for printer
    File paper
    Graph paper
    Calendar & diary
    Pens, pencils, crayons etc
    Highlighters
    Tippex
    pencil sharpener & rubbers
    Glue
    Scissors
    File dividers
    Transparent pocket thingys for folders
    Pencil case of some kind?
    Crappy calculator (yes i know ill need a new one)
    Ruler, compass , protractor (?)
    Ink cartridges (becaise I like a proper pen)
    Sellotape

    well..... do i need anything else... ? (I just found a £10 WH smiths voucher tucked away... ). I remember ehearing clipboards were handy for practicals? Is this true or did i imagine it?

    I'm bringing my fantastic PHYSIOLOGY COLOURING BOOK so i can sit and colour and pretend to be working (maybe one day i will actually understand kidneys..who knows?)


    BY the way Worksop Boy......minor deity?........what cobs / pop do you prefer? I will try to accomodate you. However I do not take cobs when StinkyMan has made them, as we do not think he washes his hands often. If you are willing to take this risk though.......ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE (my dog eats his cobs, anyway, and he hasnt died yet)

    AGH JUST REALISING SO MUCH TO DO. Tomorrow I may have to go into Suttomn and buy some glasses or..something. I always promised myself that when i left ohome i would only buy unbreakable kitchenware, though...

    I used to know someone from worksop, well, know in the sense that he used to send me random emails and i never actually met him. the really annoying thing is I CANT REMEMBER HIS NAME ...so I can't even ask if yo know him. I think it was something innocuous like Mark or David or Adam. but not actually any of those......

    argh. i am now part terror part excitement. (excitmenet? me? ..i know..)

    I had one of those ribena with chillies whatsits earlier and i thinkk it has unhinged my brain..DAMMIT!
 
 
 
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