Cambridge Chat (previously New Cambridge Students Entry 2004)

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Ben.S.
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#10521
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#10521
(Original post by crana9)
anyway if they ere that craply paid david ellar couldnt afford to pay people for the answers to lexcture questions
Does he still show slides of wine labels? And ask you what the thing on the front of the lecture handout is? And why RNA has uridine instead of thymidine? And why you don't get S-S inside cells? Mark Tester and Simon Maddrell ARE rich, though.

Ben
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fishpaste
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#10522
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#10522
(Original post by Ben.S.)
LOW STRESS?

Ben
Well perhaps I mean "low liability." I mean I know they have alot of responsibility but I reckon I'd find it alot less stressful than most jobs. Because they don't seem to get *******ed or be pressured into doing more and more.
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crana9
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#10523
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#10523
Ben... did you seriously think I thought lecturers would or should get minimum wage...?

btw.. whats the difference between uridine/uracil and thymidine/thymine ? are they the proper names for the bases once they're bonded together?

he does still show the wine labels.. he asked about the RNA.. dont think he did about the others he just told us them.

he kept asking us stuff that was on the handout which was silly
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MadNatSci
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#10524
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#10524
Nice to see you making your presence felt again, Ben

I'd agree with you though. Lecturers deserve good pay: aside from all the crap you already mentioned, they've trained for rather a long time and probably accumulated quite a lot of debt along the way. They deserve much better pay than they get. Although I must admit I kind of fancy being able to take a sabbatical, which your average worker couldn't

That said, the really crap ones should be sacked immediately because they're putting potential academics off subjects; they often aren't - the notorious metab lecturer (carefully mentioning no names) had been doing it for about three years already by the time we came along. I still find it difficult to understand why they hadn't sacked him before.

Incidentally did you know Chris Howe is the nephew of Fred Sanger?! *Nicky's exciting fact of the week*
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MadNatSci
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#10525
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#10525
(Original post by crana9)
Ben... did you seriously think I thought lecturers would or should get minimum wage...?

btw.. whats the difference between uridine/uracil and thymidine/thymine ? are they the proper names for the bases once they're bonded together?

he does still show the wine labels.. he asked about the RNA.. dont think he did about the others he just told us them.

he kept asking us stuff that was on the handout which was silly
I think uridine and thymidine are the nucleosides. Uracil and thymine are nucleotides.

If I am wrong on this I really shouldn't be so please kill me now.
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Ben.S.
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#10526
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#10526
(Original post by fishpaste)
Because they don't seem to get *******ed or be pressured into doing more and more.
Try having some as parents - that isn't the case at all. It can get extremely pressurised and VERY competetive. Things tend to get very hostile where brains are concerned. However, it might be different with maths. As for English, well...

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crana9
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#10527
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#10527
(Original post by fishpaste)
Well perhaps I mean "low liability." I mean I know they have alot of responsibility but I reckon I'd find it alot less stressful than most jobs. Because they don't seem to get *******ed or be pressured into doing more and more.
..........and they can be as Bolloux as they like and still get invited back for year 2
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Ben.S.
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#10528
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#10528
(Original post by MadNatSci)
Nice to see you making your presence felt again, Ben

I'd agree with you though. Lecturers deserve good pay: aside from all the crap you already mentioned, they've trained for rather a long time and probably accumulated quite a lot of debt along the way. They deserve much better pay than they get. Although I must admit I kind of fancy being able to take a sabbatical, which your average worker couldn't

That said, the really crap ones should be sacked immediately because they're putting potential academics off subjects; they often aren't - the notorious metab lecturer (carefully mentioning no names) had been doing it for about three years already by the time we came along. I still find it difficult to understand why they hadn't sacked him before.

Incidentally did you know Chris Howe is the nephew of Fred Sanger?! *Nicky's exciting fact of the week*
I did know that - it was subtley hinted by David Summers or someone last year (I can't remember exactly who). They accumulated less debt, thanks to grants!

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crana9
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#10529
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#10529
(Original post by Ben.S.)
Try having some as parents - that isn't the case at all. It can get extremely pressurised and VERY competetive. Things tend to get very hostile where brains are concerned. However, it might be different with maths. As for English, well...

Ben
ahh, but ben.. if both your parents are lecturers, unless you have a healthy complement of stepparents or similar.. perhaps your perceptions of it as a job compared to others.. are a bit one sided
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MadNatSci
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#10530
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#10530
(Original post by Ben.S.)
I did know that - it was subtley hinted by David Summers or someone last year (I can't remember exactly who). They accumulated less debt, thanks to grants!

Ben
Less debt than we will, yeah...
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fishpaste
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#10531
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#10531
(Original post by Ben.S.)
Things tend to get very hostile where brains are concerned.
This is true, and a good point. I dunno though, like looking around the CMS I get the impression that the compensation for the rubbishy pay is getting to belong to this friendly little community where you're absorbed into mathematical culture. I think fermat's last theorem by Simon Singh describes the notion very well.
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Willa
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#10532
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#10532
what's the notation: (r, a, b)|0 mean when working with cylindrical coordinates?
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Ben.S.
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#10533
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#10533
(Original post by crana9)
ahh, but ben.. if both your parents are lecturers, unless you have a healthy complement of stepparents or similar.. perhaps your perceptions of it as a job compared to others.. are a bit one sided
Well, yes - one of my aunts is a doctor, the other is a teacher and she's married to a doctor (my only uncle). There's that, and the fact that my mum is now on anti-depressants and hasn't been to work for two months (that's where most of my one-sidedness is coming from).

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Willa
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#10534
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#10534
lol....love the new "server busy" messages....they clearly know that we spend half our time looking at them!
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crana9
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#10535
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#10535
im sorry to hear about your mum and I hope she's feeling better soon.

i actually bothered to look this up and starting salary on the lecturer pay scale (from the Natfhe, this is) is now £23.6k, and you can earn up to £46k (these are without London weighting). thats not too shabby (!) compared to other jobs in academia, healthcare etc, where people often have similar levels of qualifications & experience.

part-time hourly rate is >£30 an hour
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Ben.S.
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#10536
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#10536
(Original post by crana9)
im sorry to hear about your mum and I hope she's feeling better soon.

i actually bothered to look this up and starting salary on the lecturer pay scale (from the Natfhe, this is) is now £23.6k, and you can earn up to £46k (these are without London weighting). thats not too shabby (!) compared to other jobs in academia, healthcare etc, where people often have similar levels of qualifications & experience.

part-time hourly rate is >£30 an hour
The top end is technically limitless (apparently), when (if!) you (get made) become a professor. The problem is that it can take an awfully long time to get anywhere. I don't think anybody is going to take on a lecturer straight after a PhD, are they? Don't they demand few years researchy experience first? What jobs in healthcare were you referring to? Mum should (hopefully) be better by Christmas (this has happened before - it's a bit of a strain).

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crana9
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#10537
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#10537
(Original post by Ben.S.)
The top end is technically limitless (apparently), when (if!) you (get made) become a professor. The problem is that it can take an awfully long time to get anywhere. I don't think anybody is going to take on a lecturer straight after a PhD, are they? Don't they demand few years researchy experience first? What jobs in healthcare were you referring to? Mum should (hopefully) be better by Christmas (this has happened before - it's a bit of a strain).

Ben
if it's the job that's doing that to her has she (I hope this doesn't come over wrong) thought about changing fields?

ah well i was talking about the lecturer pay scale not one for professors

I was thinking about jobs in clinical science.. IIRC you usually start ar ~£21k and are usually expected to have a PhD.. and you need several years' training & experience to move up in pay levels. so I reckon this would be roughly equivalent to starting at ~£23k with some extra years' research experience.
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Ben.S.
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#10538
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#10538
(Original post by crana9)
if it's the job that's doing that to her has she (I hope this doesn't come over wrong) thought about changing fields?

ah well i was talking about the lecturer pay scale not one for professors

I was thinking about jobs in clinical science.. IIRC you usually start ar ~£21k and are usually expected to have a PhD.. and you need several years' training & experience to move up in pay levels. so I reckon this would be roughly equivalent to starting at ~£23k with some extra years' research experience.
Yeah - I meant to include that sort of work as well. Anything vaguely researchy and academic is not paid particularly fantasitcally. Have you looked in the back of some of the science journals? It's good for a depressing laugh! With my mum it was a combination of things - mainly coming off HRT (but it makes a good job stress argument!).

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crana9
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#10539
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#10539
the only flaw with it as an argument is you have to say "well, if after all the stress etc people keep going back to the job even when it makes them ill, it must have some really good things going for it as a job"


yknow, i quite like paperwork. im thinking i could work and do all the paperwork everyone in almost every other job *****es about doing. i reckon i could make a mint. and I wouldnt have to stand on my feet all day long.
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Poc ar buile
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#10540
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#10540
(Original post by Ben.S.)
The top end is technically limitless (apparently), when (if!) you (get made) become a professor.
My mate's daddy is a professor in Southampton. He gets about 40k. The person who had the job before him left to work in consultancy. When Doric (Jay's daddy) asked how much the forer professor was getting he said "about ten times more than you"...

Academia doesn't pay very well at all for your level of expertise...
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