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    So earlier this year I went through the process of taster days etc as I thought I was going to move schools from a comprehensive to an independent. Back then, the main points of moving where:

    smaller classes, diverse clubs, more support as I am the first year to do the first GCSEs, more people who were achieving higher (as I am the best in year for some subjects, I found it very hard to be challenged at tasks and all I knew was my limit. I took the scholarship test which people in the other school took too but didn't get 1 of the 4 - that says something!).

    But in the past few weeks I have been wandering about my decision which I made in March of submitting the acceptance letter.I feel as though I may be able to get straight 9s and 8s (new GCSE's remember!) without the 15000 pounds a year, which would be so much of a help to my family. But I am still not sure yet, as an independent school would probably make me more confident, and help me to achieve higher.

    On the other hand, if i stay at my current school, I would have to do RS as one of my choices, and I don't think I am the best at that subject. but with a lot of practise from GCSE, perhaps I could receive a decent grade...

    So what do you think I should do? I have never been to an independent school in my life so I don't know what the environment would be like. Furthermore, how would I tell my parents if I chose not to go from year 10? I think they have already payed the first term's 5000 pounds, but it would be non-refundable. However, it is better than paying 30000 pounds for the full price for 2 whole years!

    Thanks xx. I have been worrying about this A LOT over the past few weeks and it's nice to finally get it off my chest!
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    I went to an independent school for GSCE and to a Comprehensive at Alevel ! If you can get 8&9 at GCSE, imagine what you can achieve at A levels/ IB! I would say that going to an independent school has improved my confidence a lot! I would say that the environment is the same as a comprehensive school. If I were you I would seize the opportunity to go to an independent school
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    (Original post by axolottis)
    So earlier this year I went through the process of taster days etc as I thought I was going to move schools from a comprehensive to an independent. Back then, the main points of moving where:

    smaller classes, diverse clubs, more support as I am the first year to do the first GCSEs, more people who were achieving higher (as I am the best in year for some subjects, I found it very hard to be challenged at tasks and all I knew was my limit. I took the scholarship test which people in the other school took too but didn't get 1 of the 4 - that says something!).

    But in the past few weeks I have been wandering about my decision which I made in March of submitting the acceptance letter.I feel as though I may be able to get straight 9s and 8s (new GCSE's remember!) without the 15000 pounds a year, which would be so much of a help to my family. But I am still not sure yet, as an independent school would probably make me more confident, and help me to achieve higher.

    On the other hand, if i stay at my current school, I would have to do RS as one of my choices, and I don't think I am the best at that subject. but with a lot of practise from GCSE, perhaps I could receive a decent grade...

    So what do you think I should do? I have never been to an independent school in my life so I don't know what the environment would be like. Furthermore, how would I tell my parents if I chose not to go from year 10? I think they have already payed the first term's 5000 pounds, but it would be non-refundable. However, it is better than paying 30000 pounds for the full price for 2 whole years!

    Thanks xx. I have been worrying about this A LOT over the past few weeks and it's nice to finally get it off my chest!
    I went to an independent school for GSCE and to a Comprehensive at Alevel ! If you can get 8&9 at GCSE, imagine what you can achieve at A levels/ IB! I would say that going to an independent school has improved my confidence a lot! I would say that the environment is the same as a comprehensive school. If I were you I would seize the opportunity to go to an independent school
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    Definitely seize the opportunity, really. I went to a state academy for secondary school and matriculated to a boarding and day independent school for sixth form. Do it, believe me. I you can afford it and stuff, do it. They can open a lot of doors for you and its sad but its just the reality of it. You'd be silly not to take the plunge, unless you felt you didn't fit or had genuine anxieties about going.
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    I went to a comprehensive secondary school and private boarding college to do A levels and I 100% recommend it! Smaller class sizes and just generally a much better work ethic, I would never have got the A-levels I did at my previous school! If you're lucky enough to be able to do it then definitely do.


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    (Original post by axolottis)
    So earlier this year I went through the process of taster days etc as I thought I was going to move schools from a comprehensive to an independent. Back then, the main points of moving where:

    smaller classes, diverse clubs, more support as I am the first year to do the first GCSEs, more people who were achieving higher (as I am the best in year for some subjects, I found it very hard to be challenged at tasks and all I knew was my limit. I took the scholarship test which people in the other school took too but didn't get 1 of the 4 - that says something!).

    But in the past few weeks I have been wandering about my decision which I made in March of submitting the acceptance letter.I feel as though I may be able to get straight 9s and 8s (new GCSE's remember!) without the 15000 pounds a year, which would be so much of a help to my family. But I am still not sure yet, as an independent school would probably make me more confident, and help me to achieve higher.

    On the other hand, if i stay at my current school, I would have to do RS as one of my choices, and I don't think I am the best at that subject. but with a lot of practise from GCSE, perhaps I could receive a decent grade...

    So what do you think I should do? I have never been to an independent school in my life so I don't know what the environment would be like. Furthermore, how would I tell my parents if I chose not to go from year 10? I think they have already payed the first term's 5000 pounds, but it would be non-refundable. However, it is better than paying 30000 pounds for the full price for 2 whole years!

    Thanks xx. I have been worrying about this A LOT over the past few weeks and it's nice to finally get it off my chest!
    Hi, I would say you should stay at your school, and achieve good grades. Then move to a private school for sixth form. If you are already achieving high grades at your current school don't move. Yes, private schools on average have better grades but it comes down to the individual, you can find some very unintelligent, brainless people at private school, trust me. Stay, save the money and the move for sixth form! I made that decision and I stand by it! Hope this helps! xx
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    I am at a private school and have some close friends at state schools. The main difference that has come up is that at my school, there are many clinics, after school help sessions and teachers always willing to help if you need it at my school. My friends have found that they were largely left to study by themselves, which does work for some people, however I have really appreciated that teachers were prepared to go the extra mile to help me, even though I generally didn't need it. The small classes at my school (roughly 20 per subject class) have also been lovely as the teachers really know each individuals strengths and weaknesses, and how to best teach you personally. Good luck making your decision!
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    this is where I'm weird, i chose against going to a private school because of the economic inequality of it. it is unfair that some people who's parents happen to be rich means they can afford a usually better quality of education and therefore better chances at life. if i was in power i would ban private education (along with private healthcare and utilities)
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    Whilst I understand that it can be viewed as unfair that some people cannot afford private education, banning it and private healthcare would put so much additional pressure on government income and resources that unless many other sectors of the economy had funding significantly reduced, it would not be physically possible without creating a huge budget deficit. Not only this, but there would also be a huge amount of unemployment from all of the teachers, site management team staff, cleaners, etc. who work at private schools. Whilst you personally may be against them, it is not viable to abolish them. The most economically efficient 'free-market' economies revolve around the privatisation of healthcare and education. If axolottis's parents can afford them this privilege, then why not take it? That is my view, anyway.
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    (Original post by axolottis)
    So earlier this year I went through the process of taster days etc as I thought I was going to move schools from a comprehensive to an independent. Back then, the main points of moving where:

    smaller classes, diverse clubs, more support as I am the first year to do the first GCSEs, more people who were achieving higher (as I am the best in year for some subjects, I found it very hard to be challenged at tasks and all I knew was my limit. I took the scholarship test which people in the other school took too but didn't get 1 of the 4 - that says something!).

    But in the past few weeks I have been wandering about my decision which I made in March of submitting the acceptance letter.I feel as though I may be able to get straight 9s and 8s (new GCSE's remember!) without the 15000 pounds a year, which would be so much of a help to my family. But I am still not sure yet, as an independent school would probably make me more confident, and help me to achieve higher.

    On the other hand, if i stay at my current school, I would have to do RS as one of my choices, and I don't think I am the best at that subject. but with a lot of practise from GCSE, perhaps I could receive a decent grade...

    So what do you think I should do? I have never been to an independent school in my life so I don't know what the environment would be like. Furthermore, how would I tell my parents if I chose not to go from year 10? I think they have already payed the first term's 5000 pounds, but it would be non-refundable. However, it is better than paying 30000 pounds for the full price for 2 whole years!

    Thanks xx. I have been worrying about this A LOT over the past few weeks and it's nice to finally get it off my chest!
    I went to private school from Year 9 onwards, having previously attended the local state schools. For me, it was a mixed bag. Academically, the teachers were on average no better at their jobs than the teachers at a good state school, but they did have more time to devote to extra clinics etc., as a previous poster said. The work ethic was also, in general better, and this probably helped my own work ethic to a certain extent. In terms of the social side, some of the extra-curricular opportunities did improve my confidence, but in general I found a lot of the other students to be quite overconfident and, in particular, to have very different values to me (very right-wing and quite obsessed with money and not much else). This can work for some people – lots of people at my school loved the environment and the people – but for me personally the result was that, after leaving school last year to come to uni, I am now only in touch with one person from my year, out of 120 students. This shows that there were just very few people in the school who I felt I could relate to.

    The moral issue of inequality did also bother me – whilst I agree that it wouldn't be practical to ban private schools at this point, I still question whether going there was the right thing to do. I was too young to really make that decision when I started at the school, but looking back it does go against the principles I now have.

    So my advice would be to consider whether you will fit into the environment at the school, and be aware that the people there will probably be of less diverse backgrounds than they would at a state school. If you don't think this would be a problem for you in terms of finding people you can relate to, then perhaps consider going to the private school for the extra support it can give you. If you feel you would be more comfortable in a less rarefied environment, then perhaps consider whether you would be happier at the state school. For me, I don't necessarily regret the decision to go to private school, as at the time it seemed like the best of a less-than-ideal set of options, but it is still something I often think about and question.That's just my personal experience, anyway. Hope it helps!
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    I go to a private school and I am currently in yr 11, my brother goes to a state school and I am really glad that I chose to go to a private school. Maybe you could apply for a bursary or scholarship?
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    Hi! I have gone to a private school for the majority of my life, and \i recently moved to a public school (but after this year im starting sixth form in a new private school) I would say go for the private school, mainly because I think they would give you the most support during the new changes in GCSEs. Whilst I love my school and am sad to be leaving, the school dropped subjects I was meant to do and generally became slightly unreliable in terms of decisions. Private schools cater more to your needs and because you are paying for it, you can go to them with any queries and they have a duty to help.
    If you are struggling in terms of money you could try getting a bursary and that way the school can look into how they can help you the most, e.g. free uniform, free lunches etc etc.


    All the best !!
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    I go to a private school and one of my brothers go to a grammar school. The teachers are much better at my school (half of them are out of Oxbridge). They effectively do half your revision for you. Of course a grammar school achieves higher grades because the students are on average more intelligent but private schools still achieve a lot higher grades than state schools. We have also found that my private school is a lot more helpful and has better connections in helping you get into the top few universities. Because all the teachers have went to decent Russell group university ( which I imagine hardly any have at your state school at the mojo), they know how to get in. I would go to the private school because even though it sets you back in the short term £wise, it pays off in the end.
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    I definitely would if I were you - I had the opportunity of a 5 year scholarship at a private school from year 7 to year 11 and I wish I took it but I hadn't because of the stigma around single-sex schools. Going somewhere like that where people are high achieving because they have a great education will benefit you because you're surrounding yourself with clever minds & positivity as opposed to state school where before exams there's tonnes of people preaching about how they're about to fail etc etc
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    (Original post by iamamarxist)
    this is where I'm weird, i chose against going to a private school because of the economic inequality of it. it is unfair that some people who's parents happen to be rich means they can afford a usually better quality of education and therefore better chances at life. if i was in power i would ban private education (along with private healthcare and utilities)
    well I'm not rich my parents just worked incredibly hard, juggling multiple jobs to get me the best education ..
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    (Original post by abiantoinette)
    well I'm not rich my parents just worked incredibly hard, juggling multiple jobs to get me the best education ..
    you're richer than 94% of the uk population matey

    i have no money in my family and i was offered a full scholarship and i declined it because i do not want to become part of bourgeoise
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    (Original post by iamamarxist)
    you're richer than 94% of the uk population matey

    i have no money in my family and i was offered a full scholarship and i declined it because i do not want to become part of bourgeoise

    i think thats a very biased view about private schools tbh ... but thats your view i guess
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    Imo grades wise it's all down to the individual, it's just that at private schools you'd work harder as your parents are paying a ton each year. You can easily achieve similar grades if you stayed but 1 problem is that as stated with some public schools class time can be wasted due to other individuals, but if you studied at home you'd do just as well
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    (Original post by abiantoinette)
    i think thats a very biased view about private schools tbh ... but thats your view i guess
    well it's not it's called statistics, but whatever
 
 
 
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