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    hello would really appreciate if some one could look over my answer and give some feed back, exam is on Monday , thanks.
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    Inspector calls
    Explore the ways in which Priestley makes this a significantmoment in the play.
    Near to the end of the play the inspector leaves after hehas finished questioning each individual and Gerald returns to the house with news after his walk. J.b priestly makes this a significant moment in the play by showing the audience all the characters responses. Straight away it isevident there is a strong divide in the family’s attitudes towards theInspector being “a fake”. Mr and Mrs Birling are the first to respond toGerald’s findings and the stage directions priestly attaches to them show theaudience their instant thoughts:“(excitedly)” from Mr birling and “(triumphantly)” from Mrs birling are anexample of how their mood is not effected after hearing the death of a lower class woman called Evasmith. Throughout the play both characters have remained determined not toexcept any blame and keep their reputations untouched. This highlights how selfishthey are and the bitterness they show towards lower classes, even a suicidethey contributed to is irrelevant to them because they have yet to of beenfound by legitimate authority, Gerald and Mr birling describe it as “we’ve beenhad.” reinforcing there lack of sympathy to the seriousness of their actions.

    The younger generation in the play share a contrastingopinion to their mother and father. Sheila who at the start was portrayed as a spoiltand unengaged character develops a sincere remorse for herself and her family’sinvolvement with Eva smith. Unlike her parents and fiancé Sheila understandsthe news of a fake inspector doesn’t change what she did and that a young girlis still dead because of it. After her father’s remark near to the end of the extract about it making all the difference the inspector was not real Sheilaspeaks up to say “(bitterly) I suppose were all nice people now.” Priestlychoice of words emphasise Mr birling’s ignorance which is significant becausethe audience can clearly see two viewpoints and it is obvious to the 1940scrowd who is morally right. Sheila’s sarcastic tone mocks her father’s commentand the word “nice” is the opposite of Mr birling’s nature, and her ownspiteful act to Eva smith. In the erapriestly wrote the play women were seen as inferior to men and age symbolisedwisdom, priestly goes against these stereotypes as he displays the younggeneration to have more sense.

    Throughout the play Mr Birling has shown a preferencetowards Gerald compared to his own son. He is desperate to impress Gerald andhis father so that his business will benefit from their success making himricher, also strengthening his status which was all that was important in theearly 20th century. Gerald is welcomed back into their home by MrsBirling after his confession to an affair with Eva smith. This shows how littleconsideration Mr and Mrs Birling have for others including their children, nocharacter has shown concern for Sheila’s feelings after finding her fiancé wasunfaithful and her parents do not question him about his behaviour towardsthere only daughter. When Gerald asks if it okay for him to return Mrs Birlinganswers “No, of course not, Gerald.” Showing complete disregard for Sheiladismissing all that he has done. Mr birling’s only worry is to keep hisreputation untarnished and conceal the embarrassments of his family fromGerald. He “(hastily)” interrupts Sheila with “Now – now – we needn’t botherhim with all that stuff” when she begins to inform Gerald of what has happened.This supports Mr Birling’s desperation to remain faultless in front of Geraldin attempt to appear worthy of his association. He refers to the eveningsevents as ‘’stuff’’ again supporting his diminutive regard for Eva smith who representsthe lower classes.��Ԗ�AX
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    ? Its where
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    (Original post by shaun.agh)
    Inspector calls
    Explore the ways in which Priestley makes this a significantmoment in the play?


    Near to the end of the play the inspector leaves after he has finished questioning each individual and Gerald returns to the house with news after his walk. J.b priestly makes this a significant moment in the play by showing the audience all the characters responses, and their different attitudes towards Inspectors Presence/Message. Immediately, it is evident there is a strong divide in the family’s attitudes towards the Inspector being “an imposter”. Mr and Mrs Birling are the first to respond toGerald’s findings and the stage directions priestly attaches to them show theaudience their instant thoughts:“(excitedly)” from Mr birling and “(triumphantly)” from Mrs birling are anexample of how their mood is not effected after hearing the death of a lower class woman called Evasmith - elaborate. Throughout the play both characters have remained determined not toexcept any blame and keep their reputations untouched. This highlights how selfishthey are and the bitterness they show towards lower classes, even a suicidethey contributed to is irrelevant to them because they have yet to of beenfound by legitimate authority, Gerald and Mr birling describe it as “we’ve beenhad.” reinforcing there lack of sympathy to the seriousness of their actions.

    The younger generation in the play share a contrastingopinion to their mother and father. Sheila who at the start was portrayed as a spoiltand unengaged character develops a sincere remorse for herself and her family’sinvolvement with Eva smith. Unlike her parents and fiancé Sheila understandsthe news of a fake inspector doesn’t change what she did and that a young girlis still dead because of it. After her father’s remark near to the end of the extract about it making all the difference the inspector was not real Sheilaspeaks up to say “(bitterly) I suppose were all nice people now.” Priestlychoice of words emphasise Mr birling’s ignorance which is significant becausethe audience can clearly see two viewpoints and it is obvious to the 1940scrowd who is morally right. Sheila’s sarcastic tone mocks her father’s commentand the word “nice” is the opposite of Mr birling’s nature, and her ownspiteful act to Eva smith. In the erapriestly wrote the play women were seen as inferior to men and age symbolisedwisdom, priestly goes against these stereotypes as he displays the younggeneration to have more sense.

    Throughout the play Mr Birling has shown a preferencetowards Gerald compared to his own son. He is desperate to impress Gerald andhis father so that his business will benefit from their success making himricher, also strengthening his status which was all that was important in theearly 20th century. Gerald is welcomed back into their home by MrsBirling after his confession to an affair with Eva smith. This shows how littleconsideration Mr and Mrs Birling have for others including their children, nocharacter has shown concern for Sheila’s feelings after finding her fiancé wasunfaithful and her parents do not question him about his behaviour towardsthere only daughter. When Gerald asks if it okay for him to return Mrs Birlinganswers “No, of course not, Gerald.” Showing complete disregard for Sheiladismissing all that he has done. Mr birling’s only worry is to keep hisreputation untarnished and conceal the embarrassments of his family fromGerald. He “(hastily)” interrupts Sheila with “Now – now – we needn’t botherhim with all that stuff” when she begins to inform Gerald of what has happened.This supports Mr Birling’s desperation to remain faultless in front of Geraldin attempt to appear worthy of his association. He refers to the eveningsevents as ‘’stuff’’ again supporting his diminutive regard for Eva smith who representsthe lower classes.��Ԗ�AX
    B/A, going into a low A, more quotes and more elaboration.
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    (Original post by Adzkii786)
    B/A, going into a low A, more quotes and more elaboration.
    thank you very much really helpfull
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    (Original post by shaun.agh)
    thank you very much really helpfull
    Honestly, if you do that, you're capable of possibly an High A/Band 6 standard, so well done.
 
 
 
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