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Those who say A-Levels are getting easier should be force-fed Marmite!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! watch

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    In my view there should be other AVCE's, for the more respected subjects.

    For example, for those who want to do Maths but find the Maths A-Level tough (many), there could be an AVCE Maths, which is an easier version of the A-Level.

    this would help improve numeracy and mathematical skills across the country by making it more accessible.

    It would be intended for those who did Intermediate Maths at GCSE, and for example, got a C or even a D.
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    (Original post by Frances)
    Wasn't changing it into an AVCE suposed to make it more widely resepected? The government wanted people to mix and match vocational and accademic a levels, the same way they wanted them to mix and match arts and sciences at AS Levels. It was suposed to make them more acceptable to univerisites as well. None of those have totally happened really, but a lot of good unis do accept the AVCEs now.
    Yeah a lot more universities accept AVCE than they did GNVQ, this may be to do the harder exams as much as any marketing though. The new system is more flexable which enabled to me to take an AS in year 2 when I decide to go university.
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    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    Which good unis accept it? (I'm not trying to insinuate that none do btw, I'm just curious as to which ones do).
    Some of the very top ones still don't- LSE will only accept them if you have two other accademic a levels. I know places like Manchester seem quite open to them, some places like Lancaster accept them but only for a certain amount of units. I'd have to look more carefully into exactly who accepts them and who doesn't tbh though.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    Just out of interested how many A grades are actually achieved? How many people drop out at AS or have to resit AS? Its probably a lot, therefore only the better students even make it to A2.
    I cant actually remember any of stats other than that of oxbridge turning away 5,000 odd straight A students every year. When it gets to the point that the universities dont even respect(for example the new entry test of Law,Medicine and some other degrees being introduced at the top unis) an A at A-level anymore theres no argument as to whether or not the courses are too easy imo.
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    (Original post by an Siarach)
    I cant actually remember any of stats other than that of oxbridge turning away 5,000 odd straight A students every year. When it gets to the point that the universities dont even respect(for example the new entry test of Law,Medicine and some other degrees being introduced at the top unis) an A at A-level anymore theres no argument as to whether or not the courses are too easy imo.
    Dosn't that just tell you that more and more people are doing A levels rather than getting easier though?
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    (Original post by an Siarach)
    I cant actually remember any of stats other than that of oxbridge turning away 5,000 odd straight A students every year. When it gets to the point that the universities dont even respect(for example the new entry test of Law,Medicine and some other degrees being introduced at the top unis) an A at A-level anymore theres no argument as to whether or not the courses are too easy imo.
    The problem they have is that even though it might be a good thing if they were to make them much more discriminating between the grades it would be unfair on those taking them as there would be a situation were an A in 2002 meant more that an A in 2004, if you know what I mean. I think that's why they are going for the whole reform of the education system.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    Dosn't that just tell you that more and more people are doing A levels rather than getting easier though?
    A fair point actually. I never thought of that.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    Dosn't that just tell you that more and more people are doing A levels rather than getting easier though?
    No, because if you compare the percentage of people achieving A grades, it has increased over the years. Hence, the proportion of all A-Level students achieving an A is greater, not just the raw figures.
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    (Original post by Louise_1988)
    The problem they have is that even though it might be a good think if they were to make them much more discriminating between the grades it would be unfair on those taking them as there would be a situation were an A in 2002 meant more that an A in 2004, if you know what I mean. I think that's why they are going for the whole reform of the education system.
    It didn't stop the A* being introduced at GCSE.
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    (Original post by Invisible)
    No, because if you compare the percentage of people achieving A grades, it has increased over the years. Hence, the proportion of all A-Level students achieving an A is greater, not just the raw figures.
    Are the actual percentages of people who used to get A grades avaliable anywhere? It would be interesting to compare.
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    (Original post by Invisible)
    No, because if you compare the percentage of people achieving A grades, it has increased over the years. Hence, the proportion of all A-Level students achieving an A is greater, not just the raw figures.
    The main increase has been in the number of people passing A Levels, i think the average is up in the nineties.
    Back when my parents were kids [sorry] 3 As would certainly get you into oxbridge, but 2As and a B was much more common.
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    (Original post by Invisible)
    No, because if you compare the percentage of people achieving A grades, it has increased over the years. Hence, the proportion of all A-Level students achieving an A is greater, not just the raw figures.
    But maybe the exams have got harder? How many people now drop out at AS instead of continuing to A2? There are lots of factors involved, the internet also helps as you can get more revision information etc.

    People have been saying A levels are getting easier since the 1960's surely by now they would be easier than the old O levels?
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    (Original post by Frances)
    Are the actual percentages of people who used to get A grades avaliable anywhere? It would be interesting to compare.
    Probably somewhere on the net, the statistics for the last couple of years are the only ones I've seen.

    However, the % of people achieving an A is not as high as people think, hence in this respect, the difficulty level of achieving A grades is underestimated.
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    (Original post by Invisible)
    In my view there should be other AVCE's, for the more respected subjects.

    For example, for those who want to do Maths but find the Maths A-Level tough (many), there could be an AVCE Maths, which is an easier version of the A-Level.

    this would help improve numeracy and mathematical skills across the country by making it more accessible.

    It would be intended for those who did Intermediate Maths at GCSE, and for example, got a C or even a D.
    But you can do AS in the use of maths or something, aimed at those who got A-C at GCSE.
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    (Original post by Invisible)
    Probably somewhere on the net, the statistics for the last couple of years are the only ones I've seen.

    However, the % of people achieving an A is not as high as people think, hence in this respect, the difficulty level of achieving A grades is underestimated.
    on average As are awarded to the top 20%, which isn't that high, but when top unis are looking for the top 5% or less in a subject it makes it hard.
    Stats are on http://www.qca.org.uk/ under subjects if your interested.
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    (Original post by jumpunderaboat)
    But you can do AS in the use of maths or something, aimed at those who got A-C at GCSE.
    Do you mean Applied Maths?
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    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    Do you mean Applied Maths?
    Possibly but at my college they have a course called "Use of Maths AS"

    Edit: They don't do S1, M1 or D1 so its something else completely.
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    (Original post by Frances)
    Are the actual percentages of people who used to get A grades avaliable anywhere? It would be interesting to compare.
    Yep here http://www.qca.org.uk/subjects/index.html couple of years old, although there is a definate increase in the % of people getting As over the last 10 years.

    Interesting to see the decline in popularity for some subects like maths, and suprisingly economics.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    Dosn't that just tell you that more and more people are doing A levels rather than getting easier though?
    Thats a fair point, but at the end of the day the entire point of the grading system is to allow the universities to differentiate between students of differing ability and potential, which is something they cannot do if there are so many people who get As. Im unsure what percentage mark is required for grades though i seem to recall something along the lines of 40% for a pass and 70% for an A? Perhaps they should increase this benchmark to 50% for a pass and 80% A for example which would allow them to palce greater confidence in the ability of straight A students once more.
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    (Original post by an Siarach)
    Perhaps they should increase this benchmark to 50% for a pass and 80% A for example which would allow them to palce greater confidence in the ability of straight A students once more.
    But them you would have a system of an A before 2002 being worth more than an A in 2004, for example. They would have to rename the whole system for it to be fair, although I agree with your point.
 
 
 
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