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Those who say A-Levels are getting easier should be force-fed Marmite!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! watch

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    (Original post by Invisible)
    No, because if you compare the percentage of people achieving A grades, it has increased over the years. Hence, the proportion of all A-Level students achieving an A is greater, not just the raw figures.
    What about better standards of teaching?

    (Original post by Invisible)
    I've done past papers for Mathematics, Physics, Economics and Computing and the general trend was that the older the paper, the harder I found it.
    I found that with my physics exams for OCR syllabus A, yet upon retakes I have in the past increased my grade by 3 in one particular module.

    (Original post by Louise_1988)
    yep, i personally think making someone study a second language should not be compulsary in England, I know we are notoriously bad at languages but it is a fact that it is much more important for a German to speak English that for an Englishman to speak German.
    It also limits the amount of science one person can study and if you want to do Science at uni often having 3 sciences is very useful.
    I agree. I hardly know any German now and wondered why I ever wasted my time learning it. Besides you can apply that to other subjects.

    (Original post by Invisible)
    It's also noticeable that in this thread people say "no way, A2's are well hard" - That's completely irrelevant, they were even harder 10 years ago.
    Did A2s exist back then?

    I'm surprised people have not revived the debate over AEA/A3/UMS blah blah blah yet
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    This was the topic in the English Lang AQA GCSE!

    Basically, by criticising the exams now, people who took them years ago can make themselves feel better and think that ther were much more intelligent than any of us were.

    It's sad, really, but we should let them avoid depression and mid-life crises the way they see fit.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    These are my AVCE portfolios, and I had to take four exams on top of this:

    is that it? i have 4 bin bags full of notes for my Russian and British history modules alone
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    (Original post by John Paul Jones)
    is that it? i have 4 bin bags full of notes for my Russian and British history modules alone
    That portfolio is just all the stuff that gets marked, I have loads more notes andf stuff like that. Those portfolios are what the examiners marked, as well as the exams.
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    (Original post by John Paul Jones)
    is that it? i have 4 bin bags full of notes for my Russian and British history modules alone
    Did you! My condensed revision notes for the AS course fit into a slimline A4-binder - about 40 pages. But then I spent more time reading from excerpts than from the notes.
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    (Original post by John Paul Jones)
    is that it? i have 4 bin bags full of notes for my Russian and British history modules alone
    lol, same here:rolleyes: why do we have to have A4 paper? I much prepared having books than folders.
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    (Original post by Cellardore)
    lol, same here:rolleyes: why do we have to have A4 paper? I much prepared having books than folders.
    Welcome to Europe!

    I prefer loose paper and folders.
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    (Original post by AM1)
    A2s are so tough, especially with all the pressure associated with meeting predictions....

    Do you agree!

    Parents are guilty of assuming that seeing as you did well enough at GCSE to get on to A-Levels, that you can breeze through A-Levels doing a similar amount of workload at home than you did for GCSE.

    HOW WRONG THEY ARE !

    Parent's don't seem to have a clue about the educational system at the moment, about the amount of content, pressure involved or the work required to maintain the high levels that you (and they) desire.

    Many a time I had to fall out with my dad, insisting that I had plenty of time to do the pots, mow the lawn, help with a little DIY, tidy my room, and still complete a major project for Geography that a deadline was fast approaching for, and that counted for a whole unit.

    "You spend all your time when I come in your room on your computer" - another comment that youngsters doing research / typing up will be plagued with; those parents not up to speed with using the internet to find resources / make email equiries will be particularly guilty and probably expect that their hardworking (hardpushed) student son/daughter can't work with best efficiency if they are listening to the radio/favourite CD/MP3 (whatever an MP3 is, they would go away thinking!).

    A-Level is no breeze, exam time is the worse bit of it, 2 or 3 exams (possibly more) in a day, and still they don't think, despite your best manners, that hoovering up / drilling a hole / allowing young sibling into your room is going to be too detrimental.

    "Just take care of your sister for a bit would you, we're going out" - grrrrr. "Trying to do revision here.." - they don't understand.

    I was told straight from Day 1 of the A-Level courses, that the amount of pressure put upon you during the course would be the most challenging in an academic career. The content may not be, but the amount of work required certainly is, and the sooner parents and the media come down to a level where they see the amount of work that has to be done, they will never understand what angle we come from when we are outraged by their comments.
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    (Original post by Expression)
    Parents are guilty of assuming that seeing as you did well enough at GCSE to get on to A-Levels, that you can breeze through A-Levels doing a similar amount of workload at home than you did for GCSE.

    HOW WRONG THEY ARE !

    Parent's don't seem to have a clue about the educational system at the moment, about the amount of content, pressure involved or the work required to maintain the high levels that you (and they) desire.

    Many a time I had to fall out with my dad, insisting that I had plenty of time to do the pots, mow the lawn, help with a little DIY, tidy my room, and still complete a major project for Geography that a deadline was fast approaching for, and that counted for a whole unit.

    "You spend all your time when I come in your room on your computer" - another comment that youngsters doing research / typing up will be plagued with; those parents not up to speed with using the internet to find resources / make email equiries will be particularly guilty and probably expect that their hardworking (hardpushed) student son/daughter can't work with best efficiency if they are listening to the radio/favourite CD/<A TITLE="Click for more information about mp3" STYLE="text-decoration: none; border-bottom: medium solid green;" HREF="http://search.targetwords.com/u.search?x=5977|1||||mp3|AA1VDw" >MP3</A> (whatever an MP3 is, they would go away thinking!).

    A-Level is no breeze, exam time is the worse bit of it, 2 or 3 exams (possibly more) in a day, and still they don't think, despite your best manners, that hoovering up / drilling a hole / allowing young sibling into your room is going to be too detrimental.

    "Just take care of your sister for a bit would you, we're going out" - grrrrr. "Trying to do revision here.." - they don't understand.

    I was told straight from Day 1 of the A-Level courses, that the amount of pressure put upon you during the course would be the most challenging in an academic career. The content may not be, but the amount of work required certainly is, and the sooner parents and the media come down to a level where they see the amount of work that has to be done, they will never understand what angle we come from when we are outraged by their comments.
    Are you specifically referring to A2 or even AS to an extent?
    As for AS Level, I've found this year easier than GCSE to be honest. I found GCSE quite demanding in terms of the number of exams and workload needed. At AS Level I found more time to consolidate learning, do more questions/homework etc. as well as more exam preparation. i.e.) Doing lots of past papers.

    But that was AS..
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    (Original post by Invisible)
    Are you specifically referring to A2 or even AS to an extent?
    As for AS Level, I've found this year easier than GCSE to be honest. I found GCSE quite demanding in terms of the number of exams and workload needed. At AS Level I found more time to consolidate learning, do more questions/homework etc. as well as more exam preparation. i.e.) Doing lots of past papers.

    But that was AS..
    A2 more than AS - but even with AS, with the pyramid style of learning, built on GCSE, there was still a need for more care in work.

    GCSE I agree was challenging in that there were lots of exams to be sat, and that this was done over a wide range of subjects, some of which you weren't in the slightest interested in - but AS specialises more, and the level of understanding required does step up.

    A2 does require more work again, even with less subjects, the second year was by far a greater challenge than the first - and without some level of commitment to your own learning, then it is possible to get lost in the content.

    Maths is one example, where if say, you don't turn up for a couple of weeks, don't do any reading, don't do any exercises, and make no effort to catch up - by the time you return, it is possible to find yourself in a position where it makes no sense, until you've done retrospective reading to find out what the hell was going off.

    The key point I was trying to make anyway, was that parents on the whole don't understand the level of work that needs to be put in - a lot of people put hours in during free periods, and so the parents don't see their children working - they start then to assume that they don't do any work. Wrong assumption !

    We all know that it isn't possible to turn up to an A Level exam totally unprepared, relying only on knowledge that you've got in there at the time - some work has to go into it. Parents haven't understood this, and believe that seeing as for subject that you excelled at at GCSE you could maybe just turn up for and do exceptionally well; that the same must be true at A-Level.

    Time, I think, they were put straight.
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    I agree no alevels are easy. this may be more true when aiming for higher grades. ive had two very tough years with alevels but thats for another reason. i.e teaching myself an alevel in a year!!

    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    That could be a bad example, I am not sure, but if you have a look at AVCE Science or somthing like that, I am sure that the text book for that won't look easy.

    On my AVCE I had to do stuff like normalise databases to 5th normal form which is degree level stuff.
    Eh?
    He said the textbook DIDN'T look easy. I seem to remember you are dyslexic or think you are - but come on - please, at least try to read what other people actually write before you try and shoot their point down!

    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    GNVQ and AVCE's are totaly different. GNVQ is a level 2 qualifcation, AVCE is level 3. So if you do GNVQ after your GCSEs you're basicaly doing another level 2 qualifcation so you haven't move up. Also there is GNVQ Foundation which is Level 1 (year 7-9).
    Weren't AVCEs previously GNVQ Advanced?

    Edit:
    Ah, yes ,I see someone else said this. Still - GNVQs and AVCEs are not "totaly different" in the same way that GCSEs and AS's aren't.

    Also, if you do GNVQ intermediate after your GCSEs but you got poor GCSEs, then that is moving up - only (I think) 5 A*-C counts as Level 2. Level 1 is not really Y7-9, I don't think - I think it'd 5 D-Gs at GCSE?

    It would be a bit daft if level 1 was Y7-Y9 because this is not an actual qualification (having been in those years), and level 1 is not the lowest.. if you see what I mean
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    (Original post by crana)
    Eh?
    He said the textbook DIDN'T look easy. I seem to remember you are dyslexic or think you are - but come on - please, at least try to read what other people actually write before you try and shoot their point down!

    lol ..........god help me lol
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    (Original post by charliefarley)
    I agree no alevels are easy. this may be more true when aiming for higher grades. ive had two very tough years with alevels but thats for another reason. i.e teaching myself an alevel in a year!!
    Hmm, Physics (at least the OCR(B) thing) is dead easy. The A2 coursework is the only mildly trick bit, and only because of the hours that need to be put in.

    I do think at least certain A levels have certainly got easier. The things that my language teachers had to do @ A Level were far more difficult than what we are asked of now. There are also some ridiculously easy a levels - Electronics (on WJEC) is pretty much a joke, at least at my school; coursework is done on less than an hour a week and the syllabus is only thoroughly looked over the week before the exam. From what my teachers tell me, maths is no easier, but it is apparently far easier to get an A than it was previously.

    I do think that A Levels are flawed; I certainly haven't felt properly challenged by anything that's been studied on my A levels (French, Spanish, Physics, Maths and Further Maths). I'm sure there are thousands of students let down in a similar way by the examination system.

    Please don't force feed me marmite
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    (Original post by crana)
    Eh?
    He said the textbook DIDN'T look easy. I seem to remember you are dyslexic or think you are - but come on - please, at least try to read what other people actually write before you try and shoot their point down!
    I thought that was standard procedure around here!
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    (Original post by crana)
    Weren't AVCEs previously GNVQ Advanced?

    Edit:
    Ah, yes ,I see someone else said this. Still - GNVQs and AVCEs are not "totaly different" in the same way that GCSEs and AS's aren't.

    Also, if you do GNVQ intermediate after your GCSEs but you got poor GCSEs, then that is moving up - only (I think) 5 A*-C counts as Level 2. Level 1 is not really Y7-9, I don't think - I think it'd 5 D-Gs at GCSE?

    It would be a bit daft if level 1 was Y7-Y9 because this is not an actual qualification (having been in those years), and level 1 is not the lowest.. if you see what I mean
    I am sure I read this on the AQA site some where:

    Level 1 - Key stage 3, NVQ Level 1, GNVQ Foundation and other basic qualifications.
    Level 2 - Key stage 4, GNVQ Intermediate, NVQ Level 2 etc.
    Level 3 - A levels, BTEC National Diploma's, AVCEs, AS,
    Level 4 - HNC, HHD, Undergraduate degree etc.
    Level 5 - Masters, PHds etc.

    Level 1 is the lowest qualifcation you can be awarded.

    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    I am sure I read this on the AQA site some where:

    Level 1 - Key stage 3, NVQ Level 1, GNVQ Foundation and other basic qualifications.
    Level 2 - Key stage 4, GNVQ Intermediate, NVQ Level 2 etc.
    Level 3 - A levels, BTEC National Diploma's, AVCEs, AS,
    Level 4 - HNC, HHD, Undergraduate degree etc.
    Level 5 - Masters, PHds etc.

    Level 1 is the lowest qualifcation you can be awarded.
    I meant it's not the lowest level you can "be at". I mean Key Stage 3 is not a qualification.. nor is "Key Stage 4". Do you see what I mean?
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    (Original post by Expression)
    Parents are guilty of assuming that seeing as you did well enough at GCSE to get on to A-Levels, that you can breeze through A-Levels doing a similar amount of workload at home than you did for GCSE.

    HOW WRONG THEY ARE !

    Parent's don't seem to have a clue about the educational system at the moment, about the amount of content, pressure involved or the work required to maintain the high levels that you (and they) desire.

    Many a time I had to fall out with my dad, insisting that I had plenty of time to do the pots, mow the lawn, help with a little DIY, tidy my room, and still complete a major project for Geography that a deadline was fast approaching for, and that counted for a whole unit.

    "You spend all your time when I come in your room on your computer" - another comment that youngsters doing research / typing up will be plagued with; those parents not up to speed with using the internet to find resources / make email equiries will be particularly guilty and probably expect that their hardworking (hardpushed) student son/daughter can't work with best efficiency if they are listening to the radio/favourite CD/MP3 (whatever an MP3 is, they would go away thinking!).

    A-Level is no breeze, exam time is the worse bit of it, 2 or 3 exams (possibly more) in a day, and still they don't think, despite your best manners, that hoovering up / drilling a hole / allowing young sibling into your room is going to be too detrimental.

    "Just take care of your sister for a bit would you, we're going out" - grrrrr. "Trying to do revision here.." - they don't understand.

    I was told straight from Day 1 of the A-Level courses, that the amount of pressure put upon you during the course would be the most challenging in an academic career. The content may not be, but the amount of work required certainly is, and the sooner parents and the media come down to a level where they see the amount of work that has to be done, they will never understand what angle we come from when we are outraged by their comments.
    Amen!
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    (Original post by crana)
    I meant it's not the lowest level you can "be at". I mean Key Stage 3 is not a qualification.. nor is "Key Stage 4". Do you see what I mean?
    Yes I know, but they award qualifcations in levels, so they must think that anything is easier than level 1 is not worth a qualifcation if that makes sense.
 
 
 

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