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    Personality Disorders
    Mental Health Awareness Week 2016

    Personality disorders are mental illnesses where an individual differs significantly from an average person, in terms of how they perceive, think, feel about or relate to others. According to the Royal College of Psychiatrists, in any given time, up to 1 in 20 people in England will have a personality disorder.

    TSR is running a campaign all of this week for Mental Health Awareness Week 2016 to promote and inform others of the state of mental health and to try and reduce the stigmas associated with mental health.



    As part of it being Mental Health Awareness Week, I thought I’d briefly share the story of my diagnosis before going onto briefly discuss 3 of the personality disorders that I live with on a daily basis.

    My story (This content could be upsetting to some users):
    Spoiler:
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    Updated December 2016

    Bit of background: I’m the eldest of 3, born in London, and when I was 6, my parents divorced after 5 years of marriage. My Daddy decided to move me, my sister and my brother back to N.Ireland so we could be closer to his family. I haven’t seen my mother for 13 years now.

    Apart from that hiccup, my childhood was lovely, I guess. I moved into a great primary school along with my sister, our daddy raised us three quite damn well. But even then, I think I always felt different. I fell in love with reading (particularly Harry Potter), spending hours reading (I once read 5 books in 2 days non stop), though I did play some sports when I was younger . Since I was 8 I have had this irrational belief that my life is controlled by some higher being - and until last year, I thought this was completely normal. It’s not, at all. I was always a bit of a nerd, declaring when I was 9 years old that I wanted to get a PhD in history.

    When I was 12, I moved to grammar school, and that’s where things started to go downhill. It was a very high pressure school, where anything below an A grade was considered a bad grade. I quit playing sports (Judo specifically) and I started to despise playing my instrument (though I stuck at it). I was bullied in Year 10 and 11 (that’s Year 9 and 10 for you English readers), and it was particularly bad in Year 11; I considered moving schools, I ended up not doing as well as I wanted in my GCSE exams that year. I was offered counselling that year, and in my final year of GCSE, but it didn’t help much, honestly.

    A Levels. Things really went downhill. Miraculously I managed to get through AS without any bullying (except some teasing from the school I went to do A Level Politics as it wasn’t offered at my school; they would call me Hogwarts and ask what Quidditch position I played) but I increasingly began to feel even more lonely than before. It was around this time that I realised how much I hated socialising, hated being around people. I much prefered staying inside, listening to music, and reading Harry Potter. My passion for politics and history died during AS (and I have only started to regain history this year since uni).

    Finally, in February of my A2 year, I decided to go the GP. I thought I was depressed. I was referred to the mental health service but I started self harming (I have stopped now, no scars, but I consider how much I hate myself to be self harming too - it’s not always physical marks). The referral was moved through quickly and I was diagnosed with depression and social anxiety in March 2015 by the CMHT. I was put on sertraline and it gave me horrendous side effects; I was then put on fluoxetine. Again, no success. I was also put on two different antipsychotics because I also hear voice and suffer from pseudo hallucinations. No success there. How I got through my A2 exams I don’t know, but all these medication changes affected me greatly. Marred with insomnia also, my mental health plummeted and I became suicidal shortly before my exams finished up. It was also around this point that the psychiatrist saw me after the CMHT thought that the depression and social anxiety diagnosis didn’t fit. I was diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive PD and dysythmia at the start of June 2015, and I was taken off all medication.

    I tried to hide being suicidal as well as I could because I didn’t want to worry my father, but it all came to a head the weekend after I finished my exams. I came so close to overdosing, but Daddy calling me for dinner made me stop and think ‘crap, I really need help’. I couldn’t guarantee my safety however so I was hospitalised for 4 days. I spent the summer drifting as it were, and in September 2015, I moved to Dundee for uni.

    I didn’t have NHS support for the first 9 weeks in Scotland. My only support was my then new boyfriend (who has been absolutely brilliant; if you take anything positive from my story, it’s that even if you are mentally ill, you can still have a great relationship!) and my university. I had a few breakdowns during those 9 weeks.

    I entered the Scottish system in November 2015. My new CPN is lovely, much better than the psychiatrist I have to see. I tried another antidepressant, mirtazapine, over Christmas 2015, again to no success. Around the end of February 2016 my diagnosis changed again: officially it is personality disorder not otherwise specified, but it runs across six different personality disorders. I’m still waiting to be put on a waiting list for therapy. Unfortunately I think I will be waiting a long time.

    Since writing the above in May, I am still waiting for therapy. I have also tried 2 more mental health medications to no avail. I think I have gotten worse. During first semester of uni this year I had another breakdown, an extended one. My migraines have became more prominent, as have the hallucinations and voices. My relationship sadly broke down, and I honestly believe my mental health had a big part to play in it. It has left me sad and vulnerable, but I don't want people to be disheartened to hear this. My relationship was great, it was wonderful, and I miss it incredibly so. I'm just not mentally in the best place for one. Still. Onwards and up.

    There is positives though. I've had 2 part time temp jobs, and they were my first ever jobs! I'm still volunteering at my uni archives, and I talk to people in my year at uni now. I'm still a purple on here https://static.thestudentroom.co.uk/...es/biggrin.png. I'm going to get a tattoo in January. I've became more confident with make-up and now wear lipsticks! http://static.tsrfiles.co.uk/images/smilies/eek.gif (That's an achievement for me, don't judge). I've found an awesome bestie (iEthan *looking at you, mate, stop judging my music*), and this little one here (CheeseIsVeg) has became more active on TSR and never fails to be a wonderful, brilliant person.

    Things could be better, they could be worse. I'm not exactly content with it all, but hey, I'm trying. https://static.thestudentroom.co.uk/.../smilies/h.gif



    Obsessive compulsive personality disorder
    Spoiler:
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    Anankastic (obsessive-compulsive) personality disorder, (OCPD for short), is characterised by a preoccupation with orderliness and perfectionism; a person is anxious about issues that are out of their control.



    Symptoms of OCPD
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    The NHS website list the following as symptoms of OCPD. In order to be diagnosed with OCPD at least 4 symptoms must be present at a daily occurrence:
    • having an excessive interest in lists, timetables and rules
    • being so concerned with completing a task perfectly that they have problems completing it (perfectionism)
    • being a workaholic
    • having very rigid views about issues such as morality, ethics and how a person should behave in daily life
    • hoarding items that seem to have no monetary or sentimental value
    • being unable to delegate tasks to other people
    • disliking spending money, as they think it is always better to save for a "rainy day".

    The ones highlighted in colour are the ones that affect me the most. I could talk all day about how they do, but if you have any questions, please ask me!



    OCPD… Is that not OCD?
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    No! This PD (personality disorder) differs in several important ways as the NHS nicely put it:
    • People with OCD are aware that their behaviour is abnormal and are anxious about it. Most people with obsessive compulsive personality disorder think their behaviour is perfectly acceptable and have no desire to change it.
    • Some people with OCD are compelled to carry out rituals, such as having to touch every second lamppost as they walk down the street. This is not usually the case with people with obsessive compulsive personality disorder.
    • People with OCD may feel compelled to make lists or organise items in their house, but feel anxious about doing so. People with obsessive compulsive personality disorder find relief from anxiety when doing such tasks and may become irritated when prevented from doing so.



    Schizoid personality disorder
    Spoiler:
    Show

    Schizoid personality disorder is characterised by a lack of interest in social relationships, a tendency towards a solitary lifestyle, secretiveness, emotional coldness, and apathy. Affected individuals may simultaneously demonstrate a rich, elaborate and exclusively internal fantasy world. SPD is not to be confused with schizophrenia, schizotypal personality disorder or antisocial personality disorder.



    Symptoms of SPD:
    Spoiler:
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    • No desires for nor enjoys close relationships, including being part of a family
    • Almost always chooses solitary activities
    • Has little, if any, interest in having sexual experiences with another person
    • Takes pleasure in few, if any, activities
    • Lacks close friends or confidants other than first-degree relatives
    • Appears indifferent to the praise or criticism of others
    • Shows emotional coldness, detachment, or flattened affect (emotion)

    Again, the coloured ones are the symptoms that affect me. Any questions, do ask!



    Schizotypal personality disorder
    Spoiler:
    Show

    Schizotypal personality disorder is characterised by someone who has great difficulty in establishing and maintaining close relationships with others. A person with schizotypal personality disorder may have extreme discomfort with such relationships, and therefore have less of a capacity for them. Someone with this disorder usually has cognitive or perceptual distortions as well as eccentricities in their everyday behaviour.Individuals with Schizotypal Personality Disorder often have ideas of reference (e.g., they have incorrect interpretations of casual incidents and external events as having a particular and unusual meaning specifically for the person). People with this disorder may be unusually superstitious or preoccupied with paranormal phenomena that are outside the norms of their subculture.



    Symptoms of schizotypal personality disorder
    Spoiler:
    Show
    • Ideas of reference (excluding delusions of reference)
    • Odd beliefs or magical thinking that influences behavior and is inconsistent with subcultural norms (e.g., superstitiousness, belief in clairvoyance, telepathy, or “sixth sense”; in children and adolescents, bizarre fantasies or preoccupations)
    • Unusual perceptual experiences, including bodily illusions
    • Odd thinking and speech (e.g., vague, circumstantial, metaphorical, over elaborate, or stereotyped)
    • Suspiciousness or paranoid ideation
    • Inappropriate or constricted affect
    • Behaviour or appearance that is odd, eccentric, or peculiar
    • Lack of close friends or confidants other than first-degree relatives
    • Excessive social anxiety that does not diminish with familiarity and tends to be associated with paranoid fears rather than negative judgments about self

    I associate with the coloured ones.



    Treatment for personality disorders is usually a mixture of medication and therapy such as CBT or long term psychotherapy.

    For more information on mental illness, the Mind and Rethink websites are a good place to start. The Samaritans, Childline and Nightline are also great if you need someone to speak to, and also have email and instant messaging services if you can't or don't want to speak out loud to someone. If you're struggling, your GP is always a good first point of call though!

    You can post anonymously here.



    We're holding various events and writing about lots of different themes throughout the week. Take a look here!

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    :sad: hope you are good now :hugs: bullying deffo cause anyone to suffer from a mental illness, depends how severe it is... i got bullied in school too and i felt like i was worthless and dumb etc... my parents wante me to change school because we moved house and that school wasn't close to me... i refused to go to another school becausw i thought i will get bully again and all that cycle will start... i would rather stay in that school and tackle with the situation... but my parents moved me to that school (they didn't know that i was being bullied) so my new school... omg its just AMAZING, great people there and my self confidence is great i have best friends and haven't been bullied... maybe a little but not like i use to b in other school..
    Bullying definitely effect people's mentally but almost everyone's gone through this stage...
    Hope you are enjoying your life now
    :goodluck: for future :hugs:
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    (Original post by fatima1998)
    :sad: hope you are good now :hugs: bullying deffo cause anyone to suffer from a mental illness, depends how severe it is... i got bullied in school too and i felt like i was worthless and dumb etc... my parents wante me to change school because we moved house and that school wasn't close to me... i refused to go to another school becausw i thought i will get bully again and all that cycle will start... i would rather stay in that school and tackle with the situation... but my parents moved me to that school (they didn't know that i was being bullied) so my new school... omg its just AMAZING, great people there and my self confidence is great i have best friends and haven't been bullied... maybe a little but not like i use to b in other school..
    Bullying definitely effect people's mentally but almost everyone's gone through this stage...
    Hope you are enjoying your life now
    :goodluck: for future :hugs:
    Unfortunately I'm nowhere far from being better. :hugs: I don't think that my bullying experience contributed to my PDs that much; I think it's a mixture of bullying, always feeling different, a strict but loving bringing up, perhaps even genetics (it's been suggested but no concrete evidence exists yet).

    I'm so glad things have worked out for you in your new school! I had hoped that they would too for me at uni but alas that's not the case.
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    Hope you will get better :hugs: I think it's great to have a supporting bf to help you through the rough times

    I read the OCPD list highlighted in red and I equally have those symptoms on a daily basis, didn't know it was a disorder in itself. Depending on the situation it can be bad but also a good thing :P just got to make the most of it
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    Thanks for this. And thank you for explaining the differences between OCD and OCPD. I've heard about the latter quite often and have never understood the differences.
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    (Original post by Metrododo)
    Hope you will get better :hugs: I think it's great to have a supporting bf to help you through the rough times

    I read the OCPD list highlighted in red and I equally have those symptoms on a daily basis, didn't know it was a disorder in itself. Depending on the situation it can be bad but also a good thing :P just got to make the most of it
    Thank you. :hugs: My bf has been nothing but a miracle.

    I think everyone has the symptoms of some PDs but it doesn't necessarily mean you have a mental illness. It has to be excessively impacting on your life; for example, for OCPD, the excessive adherence to rules. I suspect most people have that and that's fine, but for me it means that if I hear of rule breaking, see it done in front of me etc I actually feel physically sick, I get a sore stomach and head because it bothers me so much.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Thanks for this. And thank you for explaining the differences between OCD and OCPD. I've heard about the latter quite often and have never understood the differences.
    No problem! I thought highlighting the difference was a must do. I've told people about OCPD and they dismissed it and told me I don't have a 'real PD' all because they understand it to be OCD instead. :rolleyes: Hope you're doing OK. :hugs:
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    :hugs: Airmed it was very interesting to read your story.

    I hope people will read this and realise that people's stereotypes of PD's can be wrong.

    I also hope that your wait on the therapy list isn't that long :hugs:
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    (Original post by Midnightmemories)
    :hugs: Airmed it was very interesting to read your story.

    I hope people will read this and realise that people's stereotypes of PD's can be wrong.

    I also hope that your wait on the therapy list isn't that long :hugs:
    Thank you. :hugs:
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    (Original post by Airmed)
    Thank you. :hugs:
    Damn, PRSOM.
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    (Original post by Airmed)
    Thank you. :hugs: My bf has been nothing but a miracle.

    I think everyone has the symptoms of some PDs but it doesn't necessarily mean you have a mental illness. It has to be excessively impacting on your life; for example, for OCPD, the excessive adherence to rules. I suspect most people have that and that's fine, but for me it means that if I hear of rule breaking, see it done in front of me etc I actually feel physically sick, I get a sore stomach and head because it bothers me so much.
    Haha I get what you mean - I used to be pretty bad with that. I think the way to see it is that ultimately rules will be broken, and you got to appreciate in the great scheme of things which ones are more important. IE times when you see someone cheat in an exam - it's annoying but it's not as bad as say serious criminal charges. Acceptance that **** happens is key and that the world isn't perfect


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    (Original post by Metrododo)
    Haha I get what you mean - I used to be pretty bad with that. I think the way to see it is that ultimately rules will be broken, and you got to appreciate in the great scheme of things which ones are more important. IE times when you see someone cheat in an exam - it's annoying but it's not as bad as say serious criminal charges. Acceptance that **** happens is key and that the world isn't perfect


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    Your words are true but I've a very black and white thinking pattern. No rules should be broken. I know the world isn't perfect however.
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    (Original post by Airmed)
    Your words are true but I've a very black and white thinking pattern. No rules should be broken. I know the world isn't perfect however.
    Hmm, rules after all are established by humans that are subjective in their decisions - meaning the "objective" truthiness of rules is just an illusion :holmes: but I understand what you mean
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    I think this is a brave and really useful post! I am diagnosed with Emotionally Unstable (Borderline) Personality Disorder, and I even face stigma in mh services/from some staff!!

    Hoping to become a mh nurse and work with PD sufferers to break down this stigma and make sure service users with PDs get the help they need. I'm quite lucky that there are lots of PD specific services in my area, but in some places people are discharged from services completely with a PD dx
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    (Original post by ChancedTravels)
    I think this is a brave and really useful post! I am diagnosed with Emotionally Unstable (Borderline) Personality Disorder, and I even face stigma in mh services/from some staff!!

    Hoping to become a mh nurse and work with PD sufferers to break down this stigma and make sure service users with PDs get the help they need. I'm quite lucky that there are lots of PD specific services in my area, but in some places people are discharged from services completely with a PD dx
    Thank you. :hugs: I also have BPD but I thought because it's more known it would be better to focus on the lesser known ones. Unfortunately it seems there is not a lot of PD services in my area.
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    Thanks for writing this - was really interesting to hear about this and to hear from suffering more than one PD (if i have understood correctly). I have BPD too and it is literally horrendous to live with daily. Hope you get seen soon as poss, waits are too long. I waited 10 months to see a PD service but I know others wait even longer than this which really sucks.
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    (Original post by Airmed)
    Personality Disorders
    Mental Health Awareness Week 2016

    Personality disorders are mental illnesses where an individual differs significantly from an average person, in terms of how they perceive, think, feel about or relate to others. According to the Royal College of Psychiatrists, in any given time, up to 1 in 20 people in England will have a personality disorder.

    TSR is running a campaign all of this week for Mental Health Awareness Week 2016 to promote and inform others of the state of mental health and to try and reduce the stigmas associated with mental health.



    As part of it being Mental Health Awareness Week, I thought I’d briefly share the story of my diagnosis before going onto briefly discuss 3 of the personality disorders that I live with on a daily basis.

    My story (This content could be upsetting to some users):
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Bit of background: I’m the eldest of 3, born in London, and when I was 6, my parents divorced after 5 years of marriage. My Daddy decided to move me, my sister and my brother back to N.Ireland so we could be closer to his family. I haven’t seen my mother for 13 years now.

    Apart from that hiccup, my childhood was lovely, I guess. I moved into a great primary school along with my sister, our daddy raised us three quite damn well. But even then, I think I always felt different. I fell in love with reading (particularly Harry Potter), spending hours reading (I once read 5 books in 2 days non stop), though I did play some sports when I was younger . Since I was 8 I have had this irrational belief that my life is controlled by some higher being - and until last year, I thought this was completely normal. It’s not, at all. I was always a bit of a nerd, declaring when I was 9 years old that I wanted to get a PhD in history.

    When I was 12, I moved to grammar school, and that’s where things started to go downhill. It was a very high pressure school, where anything below an A grade was considered a bad grade. I quit playing sports (Judo specifically) and I started to despise playing my instrument (though I stuck at it). I was bullied in Year 10 and 11 (that’s Year 9 and 10 for you English readers), and it was particularly bad in Year 11; I considered moving schools, I ended up not doing as well as I wanted in my GCSE exams that year. I was offered counselling that year, and in my final year of GCSE, but it didn’t help much, honestly.

    A Levels. Things really went downhill. Miraculously I managed to get through AS without any bullying (except some teasing from the school I went to do A Level Politics as it wasn’t offered at my school; they would call me Hogwarts and ask what Quidditch position I played) but I increasingly began to feel even more lonely than before. It was around this time that I realised how much I hated socialising, hated being around people. I much prefered staying inside, listening to music, and reading Harry Potter. My passion for politics and history died during AS (and I have only started to regain history this year since uni).

    Finally, in February of my A2 year, I decided to go the GP. I thought I was depressed. I was referred to the mental health service but I started self harming (I have stopped now, no scars, but I consider how much I hate myself to be self harming too - it’s not always physical marks). The referral was moved through quickly and I was diagnosed with depression and social anxiety in March 2015 by the CMHT. I was put on sertraline and it gave me horrendous side effects; I was then put on fluoxetine. Again, no success. I was also put on two different antipsychotics because I also hear voice and suffer from pseudo hallucinations. No success there. How I got through my A2 exams I don’t know, but all these medication changes affected me greatly. Marred with insomnia also, my mental health plummeted and I became suicidal shortly before my exams finished up. It was also around this point that the psychiatrist saw me after the CMHT thought that the depression and social anxiety diagnosis didn’t fit. I was diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive PD and dysythmia at the start of June 2015, and I was taken off all medication.

    I tried to hide being suicidal as well as I could because I didn’t want to worry my father, but it all came to a head the weekend after I finished my exams. I came so close to overdosing, but Daddy calling me for dinner made me stop and think ‘crap, I really need help’. I couldn’t guarantee my safety however so I was hospitalised for 4 days. I spent the summer drifting as it were, and in September, I moved to Dundee for uni.

    I didn’t have NHS support for 9 weeks in Scotland. My only support was my new boyfriend (who has been absolutely brilliant so far; if you take anything positive from my story, it’s that even if you are mentally ill, you can still have a great relationship!) and my university. I had a few breakdowns during those 9 weeks.

    I entered the Scottish system in November 2015. My new CPN is lovely, much better than the psychiatrist I have to see. I tried another antidepressant, mirtazapine, over Christmas, again to no success. Around the end of February my diagnosis changed again: officially it is personality disorder not otherwise specified, but it runs across six different personality disorders. I’m still waiting to be put on a waiting list for therapy. Unfortunately I think I will be waiting a long time.


    Obsessive compulsive personality disorder
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    Anankastic (obsessive-compulsive) personality disorder, (OCPD for short), is characterised by a preoccupation with orderliness and perfectionism; a person is anxious about issues that are out of their control.


    Symptoms of OCPD
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    The NHS website list the following as symptoms of OCPD. In order to be diagnosed with OCPD at least 4 symptoms must be present at a daily occurrence:
    • having an excessive interest in lists, timetables and rules
    • being so concerned with completing a task perfectly that they have problems completing it (perfectionism)
    • being a workaholic
    • having very rigid views about issues such as morality, ethics and how a person should behave in daily life
    • hoarding items that seem to have no monetary or sentimental value
    • being unable to delegate tasks to other people
    • disliking spending money, as they think it is always better to save for a "rainy day".
    The ones highlighted in colour are the ones that affect me the most. I could talk all day about how they do, but if you have any questions, please ask me!


    OCPD… Is that not OCD?
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    No! This PD (personality disorder) differs in several important ways as the NHS nicely put it:
    • People with OCD are aware that their behaviour is abnormal and are anxious about it. Most people with obsessive compulsive personality disorder think their behaviour is perfectly acceptable and have no desire to change it.
    • Some people with OCD are compelled to carry out rituals, such as having to touch every second lamppost as they walk down the street. This is not usually the case with people with obsessive compulsive personality disorder.
    • People with OCD may feel compelled to make lists or organise items in their house, but feel anxious about doing so. People with obsessive compulsive personality disorder find relief from anxiety when doing such tasks and may become irritated when prevented from doing so.


    Schizoid personality disorder
    Spoiler:
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    Schizoid personality disorder is characterised by a lack of interest in social relationships, a tendency towards a solitary lifestyle, secretiveness, emotional coldness, and apathy. Affected individuals may simultaneously demonstrate a rich, elaborate and exclusively internal fantasy world. SPD is not to be confused with schizophrenia, schizotypal personality disorder or antisocial personality disorder.


    Symptoms of SPD:
    Spoiler:
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    • No desires for nor enjoys close relationships, including being part of a family
    • Almost always chooses solitary activities
    • Has little, if any, interest in having sexual experiences with another person
    • Takes pleasure in few, if any, activities
    • Lacks close friends or confidants other than first-degree relatives
    • Appears indifferent to the praise or criticism of others
    • Shows emotional coldness, detachment, or flattened affect (emotion)
    Again, the coloured ones are the symptoms that affect me. Any questions, do ask!


    Schizotypal personality disorder
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Schizotypal personality disorder is characterised by someone who has great difficulty in establishing and maintaining close relationships with others. A person with schizotypal personality disorder may have extreme discomfort with such relationships, and therefore have less of a capacity for them. Someone with this disorder usually has cognitive or perceptual distortions as well as eccentricities in their everyday behaviour.Individuals with Schizotypal Personality Disorder often have ideas of reference (e.g., they have incorrect interpretations of casual incidents and external events as having a particular and unusual meaning specifically for the person). People with this disorder may be unusually superstitious or preoccupied with paranormal phenomena that are outside the norms of their subculture.


    Symptoms of schizotypal personality disorder
    Spoiler:
    Show
    • Ideas of reference (excluding delusions of reference)
    • Odd beliefs or magical thinking that influences behavior and is inconsistent with subcultural norms (e.g., superstitiousness, belief in clairvoyance, telepathy, or “sixth sense”; in children and adolescents, bizarre fantasies or preoccupations)
    • Unusual perceptual experiences, including bodily illusions
    • Odd thinking and speech (e.g., vague, circumstantial, metaphorical, over elaborate, or stereotyped)
    • Suspiciousness or paranoid ideation
    • Inappropriate or constricted affect
    • Behaviour or appearance that is odd, eccentric, or peculiar
    • Lack of close friends or confidants other than first-degree relatives
    • Excessive social anxiety that does not diminish with familiarity and tends to be associated with paranoid fears rather than negative judgments about self
    I associate with the coloured ones.


    Treatment for personality disorders is usually a mixture of medication and therapy such as CBT or long term psychotherapy.

    For more information on mental illness, the Mind and Rethink websites are a good place to start. The Samaritans, Childline and Nightline are also great if you need someone to speak to, and also have email and instant messaging services if you can't or don't want to speak out loud to someone. If you're struggling, your GP is always a good first point of call though!

    You can post anonymously here.

    We're holding various events and writing about lots of different themes throughout the week. Take a look here!
    I have BPD and it's draining me so much...
    • #2
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    (Original post by Airmed)
    Thank you. :hugs: My bf has been nothing but a miracle.

    I think everyone has the symptoms of some PDs but it doesn't necessarily mean you have a mental illness. It has to be excessively impacting on your life; for example, for OCPD, the excessive adherence to rules. I suspect most people have that and that's fine, but for me it means that if I hear of rule breaking, see it done in front of me etc I actually feel physically sick, I get a sore stomach and head because it bothers me so much.
    Is it possible to suffer from both OCD and OCPD?

    I have never heard of OCPD but having read through the list, I seem to have several of the syntoms you mentioned. It is affecting me severely, particularly my perfectionism and my inability to delegate tasks. It may be caused by my anxiety, I'm not sure, but the things you mention all sound very familiar.

    I have been diagnosed with anxiety and depression and after going through a traumatic experience, I spend considerably more time checking things and it's affecting my life quite considerably at the moment. I have been referred to mental health services in my area and they suggested that I might have OCD but I haven't been officially diagnosed as I am currently on a waiting list to see someone. Do you think it would be worth mentioning to them that I seem to have syntoms of OCPD as well?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Is it possible to suffer from both OCD and OCPD?

    I have never heard of OCPD but having read through the list, I seem to have several of the syntoms you mentioned. It is affecting me severely, particularly my perfectionism and my inability to delegate tasks. It may be caused by my anxiety, I'm not sure, but the things you mention all sound very familiar.

    I have been diagnosed with anxiety and depression and after going through a traumatic experience, I spend considerably more time checking things and it's affecting my life quite considerably at the moment. I have been referred to mental health services in my area and they suggested that I might have OCD but I haven't been officially diagnosed as I am currently on a waiting list to see someone. Do you think it would be worth mentioning to them that I seem to have syntoms of OCPD as well?
    Yes, it is possible to suffer from both at the same time. You can possibly mention OCPD, but personality disorders can only be diagnosed with a psychiatrist, and symptoms must be present for at least 2 years (if you're an adult). I hope you get the help you need! :hugs:

    (Original post by Jenx301)
    Thanks for writing this - was really interesting to hear about this and to hear from suffering more than one PD (if i have understood correctly). I have BPD too and it is literally horrendous to live with daily. Hope you get seen soon as poss, waits are too long. I waited 10 months to see a PD service but I know others wait even longer than this which really sucks.
    Yeah, unfortunately more than one. I also suffer from BPD, narcissistic personality disorder, and avoidant personality disorder (the last two are the less extreme ones). Strangely enough I think the crushing waves of paranoia, sadness and voices are the worst. I hope I am seen at some point. I met with my psychiatrist yesterday and he's useless. Meet my CPN tomorrow so hopefully he will have answers. :hugs:
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    Thank you for sharing your story. Sending you hugs. I suffer from anxiety, and used to have ED as well. What helped me the most was exercise (finding something I love, set goals and work everyday towards it while enjoying it) and my boyfriend (unconditional support). I've been 2 years ED-free and 10 months of no self-harm! Keep going
 
 
 
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