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Is a democracy still a democracy if it votes for authoritarianism? Watch

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    Let's say there's a referendum on whether to adopt authoritarian government and the elections are fair and open, conducted in secret without persecution and so on.

    Does it then cease to be a democracy? It is still the will of the people, at least at the time. I suppose a precondition of democracy is regular elections? What if they always vote authoritarianism? You could argue that they no longer have accountability for any policy, but in a way neither do we, we vote once every 5 years not based on policy.
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    Well, i guess it kind of becomes the type of democracy that is analogous to two wolves and a sheep voting what to eat for dinner, does it not?

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    (Original post by DanteTheDoorKnob)
    Let's say there's a referendum on whether to adopt authoritarian government and the elections are fair and open, conducted in secret without persecution and so on.

    Does it then cease to be a democracy? It is still the will of the people, at least at the time. I suppose a precondition of democracy is regular elections? What if they always vote authoritarianism? You could argue that they no longer have accountability for any policy, but in a way neither do we, we vote once every 5 years not based on policy.
    Yup. From that point onwards it ceases to be a democracy. Even if the people voted for the transition to dictatorship.
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    There has never been true democracy on this planet, in my opinion.
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    (Original post by ODES_PDES)
    There has never been true democracy on this planet, in my opinion.
    Interesting idea I came across.

    You wouldn't want a doctor who had no medical training, an engineer who had no experience building bridges, a poorly trained policeman to protect your family.

    Yet we trust our very society to the people who have no experience of governance? Why is it in all other professions it would scare us, and yet when it comes to the thing that matters most we are content with popular opinion?
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    (Original post by DanteTheDoorKnob)
    Interesting idea I came across.

    You wouldn't want a doctor who had no medical training, an engineer who had no experience building bridges, a poorly trained policeman to protect your family.

    Yet we trust our very society to the people who have no experience of governance? Why is it in all other professions it would scare us, and yet when it comes to the thing that matters most we are content with popular opinion?
    Ultimately it comes down to self-determination and moral perspectives. A large part of government policy is framed as a moral argument, rather than a technical one. Morality is essentially a set of opinions which require no experience.

    An interesting parallel is one where the public want democracy in their governance, but are content with a dictatorship in the workplace.
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    (Original post by DanteTheDoorKnob)
    Interesting idea I came across.

    You wouldn't want a doctor who had no medical training, an engineer who had no experience building bridges, a poorly trained policeman to protect your family.

    Yet we trust our very society to the people who have no experience of governance? Why is it in all other professions it would scare us, and yet when it comes to the thing that matters most we are content with popular opinion?
    This is just a matter of people in these fields not entering politics, and tribal partisan voting. Independent candidates find it hard to get into Parliament.

    I personally hate parties, and would wish we'd have a House of Commons full of independent, experienced MPs caring both for their constituency and the nation.
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    (Original post by DanteTheDoorKnob)
    Yet we trust our very society to the people who have no experience of governance? Why is it in all other professions it would scare us, and yet when it comes to the thing that matters most we are content with popular opinion?
    That isn't quite true. Behind the clowns that are our elected representatives, there are ranks and ranks of highly trained and skilled professional civil servants who are tasked with implementing policy. It is fair to say that they have a hand in shaping policy in ensuring nothing to outlandish is proposed.

    Where as you sort of hit a point, my concern is that there is not a very diverse selection of politicians these days. Increasingly, the political class is starting in public school, going to Oxbridge, getting an internship within a government party before being handed a safe seat by those in the know. And that goes for all sides of the house.
 
 
 
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