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    Pretty much the title...
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    (Original post by lordoftheties)
    Pretty much the title...
    Leave them last
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    (Original post by M14B)
    Leave them last
    I mean to try and answer it. For example some might relate the question to a specific topic, and then think of the methods used in that topic and see if they can be applied correctly to the question...
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    Walk up to the paper it's written on, pull out your seat if need be and get your pencil out.

    Alternatively, start vomiting.
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    I've found my own way. Most topics in math relate to calculus, at least in a certain way. If there is a problem I can't solve as it is meant to be solved (geometry or vectors for example) I turn everything into functions. Takes longer but will usually arrive at a solution. Furthermore it helps understand where the formulas applied in some parts of math come from.
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    Try to work out what topic it's actually testing, then remember the rules of how to do it, then plug in the numbers
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    Throw yourself out of the nearest window
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    (Original post by Devillain)
    I've found my own way. Most topics in math relate to calculus, at least in a certain way. If there is a problem I can't solve as it is meant to be solved (geometry or vectors for example) I turn everything into functions. Takes longer but will usually arrive at a solution. Furthermore it helps understand where the formulas applied in some parts of math come from.
    This seems a really interesting method, could you give an example?
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    Sure. In my first mock exam I had to find the distance between two planes. Didn't have the formula and at that time vectors were not my strength. But I was good at calculus. So I Simply created a sphere around a point on plane 1. Then I found the radius of the sphere for which it tangents plane 2. That radius was the correct perpendicular distance. And methods like this will work most of the time.
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    Sometimes try working backwards if it's a show question.
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    (Original post by lordoftheties)
    Pretty much the title...
    logically
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    think of everything you've been taught and think of every possible way you've been taught and go through the question and see what works
 
 
 
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