Edexcel IGCSE Chemistry Paper 2 Topics 15th June 2016

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DrPeter
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Well, here are some "MUST DO" topics for Paper 2.

ALL Electrolysis topics including
Definition
What an electric current is
Electrolyte and non-electrolyte expts.
molten (probably only if involving moles, coulombs and Faradays)
Aluminium (cryolite, electrode replacement)
Aqueous (concentrating on NaCl - diaphragm cell), CuSO4 and H2SO4.
Tests for all products and observations in all cells
Ionic half equations

Blast furnace
Raw materials (not carbon)
Know all 5 reactions in detail

Obviously uses of aluminium and iron, and why different methods used for their extraction.

Crude Oil
Process of Separation in detail
Fraction order, names, uses, properties
Cracking
Polymers (prep, differences,

Four methods of making salts

Anything related to Environment (acid rain, biodegradability, climate change)

More to be added. Your suggestions and comments are welcomed
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DrPeter
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Moles, percentage yield calculations
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Martins1
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Atmosphere
Qualitative analysis/solubility
Moles, percentage yield calculations
Ionic bonding
Halogens
Ethanol
Bond energy calculations
Giant Covalent structures - graphite/diamond
Haber/contact process
Condensation Polymerisation
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F0X
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I looked up the January 2016 papers too and made a list of all the topics that haven't come up in either Paper 1 or Jan. 2016. I did the same for yesterday's Biology and got most of my predictions correct...

Percentage yield calculation
Diamond and Graphite structure
Bond energy calculations
Haber process
Contact process
Electrolysis of aluminium
Electrolysis of brine in a diaphragm cell
Condensation polymerisation
Uses of polymers
Group 1 elements - explaining their relative reactivities
Environmental stuff
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Jesusismyhigh
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(Original post by F0X)
I looked up the January 2016 papers too and made a list of all the topics that haven't come up in either Paper 1 or Jan. 2016. I did the same for yesterday's Biology and got most of my predictions correct...

Percentage yield calculation
Diamond and Graphite structure
Bond energy calculations
Haber process
Contact process
Electrolysis of aluminium
Electrolysis of brine in a diaphragm cell
Condensation polymerisation
Uses of polymers
Group 1 elements - explaining their relative reactivities
Environmental stuff
Mostly agree; a graphite vs diamond question would be expected as a 4 marker, one of the Haber or Contact Process(and questions related to Le Chatelier's Principles), and electrolysis of some variety, probably bauxite(between them that would be about half the marks). Whilst Edexcel like to be current and 'aware of the world', considering the amount of 'environmental stuff' in that first biology paper, I don't think it will be on the enhanced greenhouse effect and the like. Acid rain, or maybe the odd question of polymers being inert. Maybe bond energy calculations and yield built into an ethene question?
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F0X
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Yeah, that all could come up. I'm not sure they'd be influenced that much by the biology paper, but I doubt we'll get a long question on the environment - probably just a few marks' worth.
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DrPeter
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Electrolysis should be top of the revision list. Do you agree?
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Martins1
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Electrolysis, crude oil, extraction of iron, ethanol, contact and haber process i think should be first in the revision schedule. They are very likely to come up and between those topics, I reckon about 3/4 of the marks are covered. Chemistry isn't too hard, so I wouold just revise it all
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F0X
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(Original post by Martins1)
Electrolysis, crude oil, extraction of iron, ethanol, contact and haber process i think should be first in the revision schedule. They are very likely to come up and between those topics, I reckon about 3/4 of the marks are covered. Chemistry isn't too hard, so I wouold just revise it all
Iron extraction, ethanol, crude oil and principles of electrolysis came up in the January 2016 paper, so I think electrolysis of aluminium and the Haber/Contact process should probably take precedence - although I agree, it's better just to learn it all just in case.
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robot no.01
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So what would electrolyte/ non-electrolyte experiments be?
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username2151383
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(Original post by robot no.01)
So what would electrolyte/ non-electrolyte experiments be?
either you can set up a circuit with a bulb or something and put the electrodes in the solution you're testing (if the bulb lights up it's an electrolyte)
or you can use a conductivity probe and put that in what you're testing (if you get a reading of 0 then it's a non-eletrolyte)
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robot no.01
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(Original post by defenestrated)
either you can set up a circuit with a bulb or something and put the electrodes in the solution you're testing (if the bulb lights up it's an electrolyte)
or you can use a conductivity probe and put that in what you're testing (if you get a reading of 0 then it's a non-eletrolyte)
thanks
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hood sniper
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(Original post by DrPeter)
Well, here are some "MUST DO" topics for Paper 2.

ALL Electrolysis topics including
Definition
What an electric current is
Electrolyte and non-electrolyte expts.
molten (probably only if involving moles, coulombs and Faradays)
Aluminium (cryolite, electrode replacement)
Aqueous (concentrating on NaCl - diaphragm cell), CuSO4 and H2SO4.
Tests for all products and observations in all cells
Ionic half equations

Blast furnace
Raw materials (not carbon)
Know all 5 reactions in detail

Obviously uses of aluminium and iron, and why different methods used for their extraction.

Crude Oil
Process of Separation in detail
Fraction order, names, uses, properties
Cracking
Polymers (prep, differences,

Four methods of making salts

Anything related to Environment (acid rain, biodegradability, climate change)

More to be added. Your suggestions and comments are welcomed
will there be any calculations like electrolysis or energy or titrations?
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Martins1
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(Original post by hood sniper)
will there be any calculations like electrolysis or energy or titrations?
Most likely - especially electrolysis/faradays experiments.
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DrPeter
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(Original post by hood sniper)
will there be any calculations like electrolysis or energy or titrations?
As mentioned in my text, yes there may be Faraday type questions.

Edexcel also like volume calculations including 24,000 cm^3 in paper 2.

Electrolysis must be top of the list for revision, including the products (and how and where they are produced) half-equations, tests and uses for the products. Also when and why Hydrogen is formed at the cathode in preference to a metal.
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furqanzahid
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Generally, how do you know when to use either 24dm^3 or 24000 in volume/mole calculations. EG when calculating the moles of chlorine gas in an electrolysis question?
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PrincessBO$$
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What grade mark do you predict in this paper?
2C is important as hell
it boosts ur grade
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umang-23
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How do you calculate molar enthalpy change?
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Martins1
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(Original post by umang-23)
How do you calculate molar enthalpy change?
q = change in temperature * mass of water * 4.18
n = mass burnt * Mr
molar enthalpy change = -q/n
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nusquam
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(Original post by umang-23)
How do you calculate molar enthalpy change?
The formula is molar enthalpy change = enthalpy change / moles
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