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    Hi everyone!

    I'm doing AQA iGCSE English Literature and have my exam coming up on Monday. While doing some last-minute revision just now I came across a technique called 'binary opposition', which I understand to be that (in a nutshell) our perception of something and whether it is seen in a positive or negative light is defined by how we view its binary opposite (e.g. hero/coward, masculine/feminine, normal/abnormal etc.).

    I was wondering if I would be able to apply this to Unseen Poetry. How would you analyse binary opposition in a poem? Would the poem have to mention both sides of the opposition or would you just mention that something is seen as positive/negative because of its binary opposite (e.g. if the poem was about cowardice would you talk about our perceptions of a 'hero', or would the poet have had to mention 'heroes')? How would this add to the theme of the poem/effect the author is going for?

    Perhaps I should avoid this altogether lol

    I'm interested to hear any advice you can give me (thanks in advance)!
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    :bump:

    (As this thread seems to have been lost under the endless onslaught... :ninja:)
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    Also could I apply this to The Curious Incident? (e.g. talking about how Christopher's strong positive view of "Truth" may contribute to his strong negative perception of lies regardless of intention etc.)
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    Last attempt to get this thread noticed :cry2:
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    (Original post by Kaedra)
    Hi everyone!I'm doing AQA iGCSE English Literature and have my exam coming up on Monday. While doing some last-minute revision just now I came across a technique called 'binary opposition', which I understand to be that (in a nutshell) our perception of something and whether it is seen in a positive or negative light is defined by how we view its binary opposite (e.g. hero/coward, masculine/feminine, normal/abnormal etc.).I was wondering if I would be able to apply this to Unseen Poetry. How would you analyse binary opposition in a poem? Would the poem have to mention both sides of the opposition or would you just mention that something is seen as positive/negative because of its binary opposite (e.g. if the poem was about cowardice would you talk about our perceptions of a 'hero', or would the poet have had to mention 'heroes'? How would this add to the theme of the poem/effect the author is going for?Perhaps I should avoid this altogether lol I'm interested to hear any advice you can give me (thanks in advance)!
    It really depends on the poem. If you had 2 binary opposites in juxtaposition (use this word when you can!) you could say that they provided contrast, but the effect of that that you would analyse depends on the question and the poem.
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    (Original post by emmald583)
    It really depends on the poem. If you had 2 binary opposites in juxtaposition (use this word when you can!) you could say that they provided contrast, but the effect of that that you would analyse depends on the question and the poem.
    Would they have to be right next to each other to be in juxtaposition or just in the same poem for contrast?
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    (Original post by Kaedra)
    Would they have to be right next to each other to be in juxtaposition or just in the same poem for contrast?
    Not necessarily next to each other, but they should be in some way linked. For example, if they were both on the same line, you could make a case for it; if there was a repeating sentence structure in the poem where one was used and then the other, you could also make a case for it.

    Juxtaposition is being placed close together for a contrasting effect, so they could be (within reason) in different places in the poem. However, if you had two ideas that weren't that near to each other and there weren't any strong links between them, I wouldn't say they were in juxtaposition.
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    (Original post by emmald583)
    Not necessarily next to each other, but they should be in some way linked. For example, if they were both on the same line, you could make a case for it; if there was a repeating sentence structure in the poem where one was used and then the other, you could also make a case for it.

    Juxtaposition is being placed close together for a contrasting effect, so they could be (within reason) in different places in the poem. However, if you had two ideas that weren't that near to each other and there weren't any strong links between them, I wouldn't say they were in juxtaposition.
    Thank you very much, you've been a big help!
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    (Original post by Kaedra)
    Thank you very much, you've been a big help!
    You're very welcome

    Good luck with the exam! Mine is on Monday too, although I do GCSE.
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    (Original post by emmald583)
    You're very welcome

    Good luck with the exam! Mine is on Monday too, although I do GCSE.
    You too! Tomorrow's not going to be fun though
 
 
 
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