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    Suggested possible question for 2016 English exam could be a Gerald based question. Please read my response and give feedback, very much appreciated.

    Written in 1945 and based in 1912, An Inspector Calls by JB Priestley represents themes of patriarchy, sexism and class division. As a socialist, Priestly disagreed with capitalism because he wanted everyone to take responsibility for each other and not return to the attitudes society had before the First World War. His political views inspired him to write the play, creating one character that withholds contrasting views presented to the audience: Gerald.
    As part of Croft limited, Gerald is part of old money which influences his political views. It makes him harder to change because when the Inspector begins to expose Gerald’s role in Eva Smith’s death, he is apologetic and for everything he has done. He describes Old Joe Meggarty as a ‘notorious womanizer’ which is ironic because Gerald cheat s on Sheila which shows he believes he is above others. Although he is guilty, he believes this will ruin his reputation much like Mr Birling who he converses with at the beginning of the play. Mr Birling speech influences Gerald and he is learning how to be a capitalist by adopting Birling’s views which is why the door bell cuts him off and the Inspector enters, being the voice of JB Priestly, trying to persuade Gerald to become a socialist. However, towards the end of the play, it is Gerald who thrives to expose the Inspector because he wants to redeem himself. The quotation ‘but is it fact?’ is part of Gerald’s dialogue as he questions the idea of an Inspector. It shows how he cannot change and that some people in society at that time were still drawn to capitalism despite some of the younger generation being easier to change. The audience feels disheartened and opposes opinions against the Birling adults because they’re wrong and should be thinking about learning from the Inspector not discovering his fake identity. They do not accept responsibility and the audience are upset that Gerald suddenly changes back to capitalism like he wants to be on the winning side.
    Another way Gerald is represented in An Inspector Calls is that he is a member of a patriarchal society and has sexist views. His engagement to Sheila is for business purposes and the ring he gave her is a gift to win her over for the benefit of Birling and Croft’s companies. The quotation ‘you know, it wasn’t disgusting’ is dialogue from Gerald who defends himself instead of taking responsibility for his affair. If it was the other way round and Sheila would’ve cheated, it would be very different and there would be no forgiving but because she is a woman, she is expected to love this man to benefit her family. The audience often feels sorry for Sheila and hatred toward Gerald because of this. It worsens by the end of act three where Gerald says ‘everything’s all right now (holds up ring)’ This dialogue and stage directions shows that he has not learned or accepted responsibility. After not long ago admitting he cheated on his fiancé, he proposes to her again because everything was a hoax but what he did still remains true. Therefore, despite Birling believing his daughter isn’t good enough for Gerald, the audience now knows Gerald is not good enough for Sheila. She becomes a communist and believes in socialism as she learns to care for Eva where as Gerald still relies solely on money.
    A final way Gerald is represented by Priestley is when he leaves the dining room which is a microcosm for society. It resembles the fight between capitalists and communists however; he is one of the few people allowed to leave the room by permission from the Inspector which shows Priestley is still in charge and using the characters as puppets. The stage direction ‘He goes out. They watch him go in silence. We hear the front door slam’ uses the word ‘silence’ in effect to show how everyone is in disbelief as to the events that have just unfolded. It makes it more dramatic as Gerald leaves and the audience is stunned. The reason for this is because he goes to expose the Inspector which proves that he is still intrigued on exposing him, not making things up to his ex-fiancé who he’s just admitted to cheating on. Priestly shows that capitalism is wrong in the form of Gerald and that he won’t change. The Inspector shows how by allowing Gerald to leave, he is creating a distance between him and Sheila, old money and new money and capitalists and socialists. Priestley wants to bring out the good in her and others. In conclusion, Gerald isn’t a respected character although his role is important in exposing the inspector and allowing Sheila to become a socialist.
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    (Original post by RosieB1717)
    Suggested possible question for 2016 English exam could be a Gerald based question. Please read my response and give feedback, very much appreciated.

    Written in 1945 and based in 1912, An Inspector Calls by JB Priestley represents themes of patriarchy, sexism and class division. As a socialist, Priestly disagreed with capitalism because he wanted everyone to take responsibility for each other and not return to the attitudes society had before the First World War. His political views inspired him to write the play, creating one character that withholds contrasting views presented to the audience: Gerald.
    As part of Croft limited, Gerald is part of old money which influences his political views. It makes him harder to change because when the Inspector begins to expose Gerald’s role in Eva Smith’s death, he is apologetic and for everything he has done. He describes Old Joe Meggarty as a ‘notorious womanizer’ which is ironic because Gerald cheat s on Sheila which shows he believes he is above others. Although he is guilty, he believes this will ruin his reputation much like Mr Birling who he converses with at the beginning of the play. Mr Birling speech influences Gerald and he is learning how to be a capitalist by adopting Birling’s views which is why the door bell cuts him off and the Inspector enters, being the voice of JB Priestly, trying to persuade Gerald to become a socialist. However, towards the end of the play, it is Gerald who thrives to expose the Inspector because he wants to redeem himself. The quotation ‘but is it fact?’ is part of Gerald’s dialogue as he questions the idea of an Inspector. It shows how he cannot change and that some people in society at that time were still drawn to capitalism despite some of the younger generation being easier to change. The audience feels disheartened and opposes opinions against the Birling adults because they’re wrong and should be thinking about learning from the Inspector not discovering his fake identity. They do not accept responsibility and the audience are upset that Gerald suddenly changes back to capitalism like he wants to be on the winning side.
    Another way Gerald is represented in An Inspector Calls is that he is a member of a patriarchal society and has sexist views. His engagement to Sheila is for business purposes and the ring he gave her is a gift to win her over for the benefit of Birling and Croft’s companies. The quotation ‘you know, it wasn’t disgusting’ is dialogue from Gerald who defends himself instead of taking responsibility for his affair. If it was the other way round and Sheila would’ve cheated, it would be very different and there would be no forgiving but because she is a woman, she is expected to love this man to benefit her family. The audience often feels sorry for Sheila and hatred toward Gerald because of this. It worsens by the end of act three where Gerald says ‘everything’s all right now (holds up ring)’ This dialogue and stage directions shows that he has not learned or accepted responsibility. After not long ago admitting he cheated on his fiancé, he proposes to her again because everything was a hoax but what he did still remains true. Therefore, despite Birling believing his daughter isn’t good enough for Gerald, the audience now knows Gerald is not good enough for Sheila. She becomes a communist and believes in socialism as she learns to care for Eva where as Gerald still relies solely on money.
    A final way Gerald is represented by Priestley is when he leaves the dining room which is a microcosm for society. It resembles the fight between capitalists and communists however; he is one of the few people allowed to leave the room by permission from the Inspector which shows Priestley is still in charge and using the characters as puppets. The stage direction ‘He goes out. They watch him go in silence. We hear the front door slam’ uses the word ‘silence’ in effect to show how everyone is in disbelief as to the events that have just unfolded. It makes it more dramatic as Gerald leaves and the audience is stunned. The reason for this is because he goes to expose the Inspector which proves that he is still intrigued on exposing him, not making things up to his ex-fiancé who he’s just admitted to cheating on. Priestly shows that capitalism is wrong in the form of Gerald and that he won’t change. The Inspector shows how by allowing Gerald to leave, he is creating a distance between him and Sheila, old money and new money and capitalists and socialists. Priestley wants to bring out the good in her and others. In conclusion, Gerald isn’t a respected character although his role is important in exposing the inspector and allowing Sheila to become a socialist.
    My feedback:

    - Make sure you consistently spell Priestley with an ey at the end!
    - Try to analyse specific words more, and go more in-depth with your quotes. You've said what the quote suggests about Gerald, but to get into the top bands you really need to be analysing at individual word level, picking out techniques and stating their connotations and effects on the reader.
    - Be careful when you refer to communism - the conflict here is Capitalism vs Labour/Socialism, and Sheila becomes a Socialist, not a Communist.
    - I wouldn't say Gerald only believes in money - although he is a typical upper-class citizen, and is focused on money (as shown through his interactions with Mr Birling), remember that even the Inspector says that he did care for Eva and make her happy for a while.

    Other that, it's a good answer. Make sure you proofread carefully for SPaG as it can get you extra marks in the exam
 
 
 
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