State Symbols

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OneMoreMinute
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#1
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#1
Can anyone help me with state symbols?
I know what each symbol means, however I don't know how to identify what compound is which.
For example:
2KOH+ H2SO4 -> K2SO4 + 2H2O
Is there a rule?
Thank you
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ben_urwinator
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#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
(Original post by OneMoreMinute)
Can anyone help me with state symbols?
I know what each symbol means, however I don't know how to identify what compound is which.
For example:
2KOH+ H2SO4 -> K2SO4 + 2H2O
Is there a rule?
Thank you
Basically you just have to think, what is the state of this compound at the temperature of the reaction? If it is liquid then put (l) if it is gaseous then put (g) and if it is solid put (s). However you do have to beware that some solids are soluble so would have the symbol (aq). Gases can also be soluble but I'm pretty sure they don't mind about that at GCSE. Also remember acids are pretty much always in solution (that means it's state symbol is (aq)). It would be very useful for you in your exam if you knew your soluble and insoluble salts btw.


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OneMoreMinute
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#3
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#3
(Original post by ben_urwinator)
Basically you just have to think, what is the state of this compound at the temperature of the reaction? If it is liquid then put (l) if it is gaseous then put (g) and if it is solid put (s). However you do have to beware that some solids are soluble so would have the symbol (aq). Gases can also be soluble but I'm pretty sure they don't mind about that at GCSE. Also remember acids are pretty much always in solution (that means it's state symbol is (aq)). It would be very useful for you in your exam if you knew your soluble and insoluble salts btw.


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Thank you that was really helpful, currently learning soluble and insoluble salts
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