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    Kinda freaking out because these 3 could come up tomorrow and i dont know anything about them at all, like why are these 3 significant ???
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    (Original post by chrlhyms)
    Kinda freaking out because these 3 could come up tomorrow and i dont know anything about them at all, like why are these 3 significant ???
    I think Carlson has a possibility - he's significant because he represents the stereotypical American 1930s worker (brutal, harsh), he's the one who kills Candy's dog and so is involved in all that foreshadowing for the death of Lennie, it's also his actions in shooting the dog and his arguments for it (that the dog is old and it's the best thing to do now anyway) are implied to be what convinces George to shoot Lennie in the end. Finally, Calson delivers the ultimate line in the play, 'Now what the hell ya suppose is eatin' them guys?', which epitomises all of the cruelties of migrant work and leaves the novel on a sense of irony.

    As for Aunt Clara and Whit, their characters are, ultimately, so insignificant I don't think they could come up. Clara is the kindly lady who adopts Lennie and, as such, doesn't even have a speaking role - or presence - in the novel, all you could really say about her is that she contrasts with the brutal lifestyle portrayed in the novel, and maybe link this to the effects of the Great Depression?

    If Whit came up I'd be completely stumped because he does literally nothing. What is even the point in his character?

    Hope that helps a bit though :)
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    (Original post by CaptErin)
    I think Carlson has a possibility - he's significant because he represents the stereotypical American 1930s worker (brutal, harsh), he's the one who kills Candy's dog and so is involved in all that foreshadowing for the death of Lennie, it's also his actions in shooting the dog and his arguments for it (that the dog is old and it's the best thing to do now anyway) are implied to be what convinces George to shoot Lennie in the end. Finally, Calson delivers the ultimate line in the play, 'Now what the hell ya suppose is eatin' them guys?', which epitomises all of the cruelties of migrant work and leaves the novel on a sense of irony.

    As for Aunt Clara and Whit, their characters are, ultimately, so insignificant I don't think they could come up. Clara is the kindly lady who adopts Lennie and, as such, doesn't even have a speaking role - or presence - in the novel, all you could really say about her is that she contrasts with the brutal lifestyle portrayed in the novel, and maybe link this to the effects of the Great Depression?

    If Whit came up I'd be completely stumped because he does literally nothing. What is even the point in his character?

    Hope that helps a bit though
    You're a star! thank you, i was thinking that Whit wouldn't, but possibly Aunt Clara saying how significant she could be in the novel as a whole?
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    Personally, I think there is no way Aunt Clara or Whit could come up, they are just not significant enough. But I suppose for the extract question they could come up if they asked you to analyse Lennie's hallucination of the rabbits and aunt clara maybe? Thats the only thing I can think could happen.
    For Carlson, I guess there is a very small possibility. He shoots the dog, goes to the brothel I think, makes the comment at the end about Slim and George.
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    (Original post by tiquismiquis)
    Personally, I think there is no way Aunt Clara or Whit could come up, they are just not significant enough. But I suppose for the extract question they could come up if they asked you to analyse Lennie's hallucination of the rabbits and aunt clara maybe? Thats the only thing I can think could happen.
    For Carlson, I guess there is a very small possibility. He shoots the dog, goes to the brothel I think, makes the comment at the end about Slim and George.
    That's a good point they may come up as an extract question. How about the boss? I feel he's the least significant out of them all
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    (Original post by chrlhyms)
    You're a star! thank you, i was thinking that Whit wouldn't, but possibly Aunt Clara saying how significant she could be in the novel as a whole?
    Like I said, I think I'd talk about her contrast with brutality, but then I suppose her only other significance beyond that is the final hallucination sequence with Lennie. The novel is written in the 3rd person so this is the only opportunity the reader gets to see a character's thoughts, it unveils Lennie's deepest fears which make his death all the more significant. I guess you could comment on how she is such a minor character and there are only two other women 'named' in the novel (Curley's wife, Susy the prositute) and what this says about sexism in the 1930s. Maybe her ultimate significance could be her implied role in the friendship between George and Lennie; maybe even George wouldn't have looked after Lennie if it wasn't for her, again showing the brutalities of 1930s America.

    Hopefully she doesn't come up though, there's hardly any quotes about her and she's not a particularly interesting character.

    If anybody has anything significant to say about Aunt Clara please quote me bc I'd love to know :P
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    (Original post by CaptErin)
    Like I said, I think I'd talk about her contrast with brutality, but then I suppose her only other significance beyond that is the final hallucination sequence with Lennie. The novel is written in the 3rd person so this is the only opportunity the reader gets to see a character's thoughts, it unveils Lennie's deepest fears which make his death all the more significant. I guess you could comment on how she is such a minor character and there are only two other women 'named' in the novel (Curley's wife, Susy the prositute) and what this says about sexism in the 1930s. Maybe her ultimate significance could be her implied role in the friendship between George and Lennie; maybe even George wouldn't have looked after Lennie if it wasn't for her, again showing the brutalities of 1930s America.

    Hopefully she doesn't come up though, there's hardly any quotes about her and she's not a particularly interesting character.

    If anybody has anything significant to say about Aunt Clara please quote me bc I'd love to know :P
    Thank you so much, you sound like you're gonna ace tomorrow!
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    wag1

    dont worry bigman dem boyz aint gonna come cos the board usually repeats significant characters repeatedly innit so youre good.
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    I highly doubt Whit will come up, but one thing you could say about him is he's young, friendly and not yet bitter about working on the ranch, but since he's already spending his earnings on whiskey and prostitutes, like the other men, you could say he's doomed to become trapped on the ranch like the rest of them. His sadness and nostalgia about one of the departed ranch workers suggests he might turn into a sad old figure like Candy, since these feelings kind of echo Candy's when his dog gets shot. You could tie these ideas into the theme of fate and how the men on the ranch have no control over their lives. But there's really not much else you can say, and I don't know what extract they could give for him.
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    (Original post by CaptErin;[url="tel:65046509")
    65046509[/url]]I think Carlson has a possibility - he's significant because he represents the stereotypical American 1930s worker (brutal, harsh), he's the one who kills Candy's dog and so is involved in all that foreshadowing for the death of Lennie, it's also his actions in shooting the dog and his arguments for it (that the dog is old and it's the best thing to do now anyway) are implied to be what convinces George to shoot Lennie in the end. Finally, Calson delivers the ultimate line in the play, 'Now what the hell ya suppose is eatin' them guys?', which epitomises all of the cruelties of migrant work and leaves the novel on a sense of irony.

    As for Aunt Clara and Whit, their characters are, ultimately, so insignificant I don't think they could come up. Clara is the kindly lady who adopts Lennie and, as such, doesn't even have a speaking role - or presence - in the novel, all you could really say about her is that she contrasts with the brutal lifestyle portrayed in the novel, and maybe link this to the effects of the Great Depression?

    If Whit came up I'd be completely stumped because he does literally nothing. What is even the point in his character?

    Hope that helps a bit though
    Aunt Clara may come up.

    The scene in section 6 where Lennie has a hallucination about aunt Clara and the giant rabbit is significant because it shows to us how Lennie feels guilty for all the things he has put George through as George's words are being reflected through the motherly figure of aunt Clara. But this also shows that Lennie is not aware of what he had done to curleys wife in the section before.
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    (Original post by A.bi.iii)
    Aunt Clara may come up.

    The scene in section 6 where Lennie has a hallucination about aunt Clara and the giant rabbit is significant because it shows to us how Lennie feels guilty for all the things he has put George through as George's words are being reflected through the motherly figure of aunt Clara. But this also shows that Lennie is not aware of what he had done to curleys wife in the section before.
    I agree that particular scene is very significant, and may come up as the excerpt but that's the only real scene of significance involving Aunt Clara, and before that I believe she only has one mention in the novel, so I don't think she'll come up as the character in Part B. I might be proven wrong tomorrow though
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    (Original post by rebeccaholland)
    I highly doubt Whit will come up, but one thing you could say about him is he's young, friendly and not yet bitter about working on the ranch, but since he's already spending his earnings on whiskey and prostitutes, like the other men, you could say he's doomed to become trapped on the ranch like the rest of them. His sadness and nostalgia about one of the departed ranch workers suggests he might turn into a sad old figure like Candy, since these feelings kind of echo Candy's when his dog gets shot. You could tie these ideas into the theme of fate and how the men on the ranch have no control over their lives. But there's really not much else you can say, and I don't know what extract they could give for him.
    If Whit were to come up, he would only be in a theme question and you'd have to figure it out for yourself and use him as an example when linking out to the rest of the book. Also, those ideas suggested for Whit were very good, if he comes up your notes will help me
 
 
 
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