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    Basically I have 'Of Mice and Men' and 'Inspector Calls' tomorrow. I know about all of the assessment objectives like context and structure because we've done loads of work on it in class. It's just our teacher assumes we know how to structure A/A* essays when i really don't . I would like to know how the introduction and conclusion play a role in the essay, also I'd like to know abit more about how to structure each point in a paragraph. (I plan on doing the extract question btw )
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    we were shown a structure guide but, sadly, i don't remember it... (good luck to my results)

    we were advised to use quotes etc that are able to link to context and be heavily elaborated on. i followed the basic PEE, but integrated context and critic links within it... PECCE?

    *edit: i noticed this is in GCSEs, not A-level... apologies? however an examiner will b blown away if you linked to critics lmao

    anyway, i don't think structure is as much as a problem than the content that goes in it. i don't suggest writing a chaotic paragraph of points, just keep to a basic structure and try to vary sentences and use key terms

    though, this is advice from a B/A student... i'm probably better hanging around for other people's input
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    Just keep to the structure of
    1. Opinion
    2. Evidence
    3. comment on effects and techniques
    4. focus on individual words from the quotation
    5. discuss alternative interpretations
    6. evidence to support #5
    7. link to whole text/context/author
    8. link to question.

    If you keep writing each paragraph like that then there's no doubt you'll get A/A*
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    Point

    Example (Quote or key moment)

    Expand on this by explaining a keyword

    Alternative interpretation

    Which interpretation you agree with

    The explanation is similar to or different to when..

    The writer's message

    Effect on reader

    This works for both OMAM and AIC.
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    (Original post by nabeeha2899)
    Just keep to the structure of
    1. Opinion
    2. Evidence
    3. comment on effects and techniques
    4. focus on individual words from the quotation
    5. discuss alternative interpretations
    6. evidence to support #5
    7. link to whole text/context/author
    8. link to question.

    If you keep writing each paragraph like that then there's no doubt you'll get A/A*
    oh ok thanks, i never thought about giving an alternative view point before
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    (Original post by cdaniels2011)
    Point

    Example (Quote or key moment)

    Expand on this by explaining a keyword

    Alternative interpretation

    Which interpretation you agree with

    The explanation is similar to or different to when..

    The writer's message

    Effect on reader

    This works for both OMAM and AIC.
    what do you mean by "the explanation is similar or different to when"? Is this linking it to the rest of the novel?
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    (Original post by vicky.m)
    we were shown a structure guide but, sadly, i don't remember it... (good luck to my results)

    we were advised to use quotes etc that are able to link to context and be heavily elaborated on. i followed the basic PEE, but integrated context and critic links within it... PECCE?

    *edit: i noticed this is in GCSEs, not A-level... apologies? however an examiner will b blown away if you linked to critics lmao

    anyway, i don't think structure is as much as a problem than the content that goes in it. i don't suggest writing a chaotic paragraph of points, just keep to a basic structure and try to vary sentences and use key terms

    though, this is advice from a B/A student... i'm probably better hanging around for other people's input
    How would i go about linking to critics??
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    (Original post by Oik1999)
    what do you mean by "the explanation is similar or different to when"? Is this linking it to the rest of the novel?
    So basically, once you've explained your quote and gotten to the point you're trying to make, it will open up different elements in the poem and you will suddenly remember quotes that may oppose what you're trying to say or are similar to what you're trying to say. If you are able to back your explanation using either of these with a similar or opposing quote, you are guaranteed to be getting good marks.
    This is because the examiner will be able to see that you fully understand the novella.
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    The key point to writing great essays is to structure them really well. Try this step by step approach to paragraph and essay planning which has really helped me in the past.

    First of all, look at the question. Look at the command word, and pick out any key words. use a highlighter if it helps you. For example, if the question is "Explore how the relationship between George and Lennie is presented in Ch1 of Of Mice and men", the command word is "explore" and the key words are "relationship" and "presented".

    Then, broadly, you want to plan your essay with regards to the question. In 1-2 minutes you can do a quick, rough mindmap and write down all the key points that answer the question. Pick the ones you want to use (probably 3-5 points depending on essay length) and write them in an order that makes sense.

    Write your introduction as a brief summary of all of your points, making sure to name the title of the text and the author. As a general rule, you should always try to give a brief answer to the question in your first few lines so that the examiner knows where you're going with your essay.

    Then you get on to your points. I use a slightly expanded version of the PEER system.
    1. Point-Make your point in one succinct sentence-you'll have time to elaborate later.
    2. Evidence-Quote directly from the text. If you can, use embedded quotation.
    3. Explanation-Explain succintly why/how this quote exemplifies your point.
    4. Language-Pull out a piece of language from your quote and analyse it. Relate it back to your point. Be specific, don't just say "the word imitated shows", but instead "the verb imitated shows". This will make your answer seem sophisticated.
    5. Reader-Examine the effect on the reader in a sentence or two. Are they worried, nervous?
    6. Interpret-Bring together everything you have said. How is the mood/atmosphere changed? Try to refer to the author and their intentions.
    7. Return-A short sentence to link back to the question and your next point.
    Obviously the above structure isn't definitive. You can change it around. Add/take away things. swap language for structure/form. But I think it's a great framework to get you on the path to better, more confident essay writing. It definitely helped me a lot when i was struggling.

    The last part of your essay is your conclusion. This should be strong and you should reach a final answer. This is the part of the essay where you could bring out any slightly more obscure or interesting ideas to impress the examiner that fit with your essay but didn't make it into the main body.

    I hope some of that helped-if you've got any questions just dm me.
    Good luck essay writing!
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    (Original post by LamantChenille)
    The key point to writing great essays is to structure them really well. Try this step by step approach to paragraph and essay planning which has really helped me in the past.

    First of all, look at the question. Look at the command word, and pick out any key words. use a highlighter if it helps you. For example, if the question is "Explore how the relationship between George and Lennie is presented in Ch1 of Of Mice and men", the command word is "explore" and the key words are "relationship" and "presented".

    Then, broadly, you want to plan your essay with regards to the question. In 1-2 minutes you can do a quick, rough mindmap and write down all the key points that answer the question. Pick the ones you want to use (probably 3-5 points depending on essay length) and write them in an order that makes sense.

    Write your introduction as a brief summary of all of your points, making sure to name the title of the text and the author. As a general rule, you should always try to give a brief answer to the question in your first few lines so that the examiner knows where you're going with your essay.

    Then you get on to your points. I use a slightly expanded version of the PEER system.
    1. Point-Make your point in one succinct sentence-you'll have time to elaborate later.
    2. Evidence-Quote directly from the text. If you can, use embedded quotation.
    3. Explanation-Explain succintly why/how this quote exemplifies your point.
    4. Language-Pull out a piece of language from your quote and analyse it. Relate it back to your point. Be specific, don't just say "the word imitated shows", but instead "the verb imitated shows". This will make your answer seem sophisticated.
    5. Reader-Examine the effect on the reader in a sentence or two. Are they worried, nervous?
    6. Interpret-Bring together everything you have said. How is the mood/atmosphere changed? Try to refer to the author and their intentions.
    7. Return-A short sentence to link back to the question and your next point.
    Obviously the above structure isn't definitive. You can change it around. Add/take away things. swap language for structure/form. But I think it's a great framework to get you on the path to better, more confident essay writing. It definitely helped me a lot when i was struggling.

    The last part of your essay is your conclusion. This should be strong and you should reach a final answer. This is the part of the essay where you could bring out any slightly more obscure or interesting ideas to impress the examiner that fit with your essay but didn't make it into the main body.

    I hope some of that helped-if you've got any questions just dm me.
    Good luck essay writing!
    Thank you so much, this has been really useful. It's nice to have someone just lay it out like this so I'm very grateful
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    (Original post by Oik1999)
    Thank you so much, this has been really useful. It's nice to have someone just lay it out like this so I'm very grateful
    Aha that's okay. We should really be thanking my amazing GCSE English teacher!
    Good luck for your exam
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    (Original post by Oik1999)
    How would i go about linking to critics??
    try to find articles online/subjective readings of the text! results may also come up if you google "(text name) critics"

    if you find them, you can pick out quotes from what they say abt characters/themes/etc and link it to quotes you get and/or context points. i think examiners value elaboration so the more you can get in about the quotes/points the better you'll do (but don't take my word for it...)
 
 
 
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