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    http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...1-QP-JAN12.PDF
    5ai?
    Can someone draw this for me please?
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    Draw a cell, then a series circuit with the wire in a beaker of water that has a thermometer in it. This goes above a bunsen to control the temperature. The circuit has an ammeter in it, in series. Across the piece of wire, put a voltmeter in parallel.
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    (Original post by Tetragon213)
    Draw a cell, then a series circuit with the wire in a beaker of water that has a thermometer in it. This goes above a bunsen to control the temperature. The circuit has an ammeter in it, in series. Across the piece of wire, put a voltmeter in parallel.
    Any chance you can draw it on a piece of paper?
    Thanks!
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    It's exactly the same as the one you posted yesterday, except this time instead of a thermistor you're drawing in the piece of wire
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    (Original post by TajwarC)
    It's exactly the same as the one you posted yesterday, except this time instead of a thermistor you're drawing in the piece of wire
    Ohh okay , this is a 3 marker , yesterday that was a 2 marker. Btw how can i draw the component for the water bath?
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    (Original post by Ayaz789)
    Ohh okay , this is a 3 marker , yesterday that was a 2 marker. Btw how can i draw the component for the water bath?


    If you want to measure the resistance of a component and how it varies with temperature do the following -

    Connect cell, ammeter (in series) and voltmeter (in parallel with component you want to measure resistance of). Add means of varying temperature to the component (usually a water bath) and means of measuring temperature (digital thermometer)
    When it asks for the procedure all you need to mention is take readings off the ammeter and voltmeter from a range of temperatures and then calculate R using V=IR. Then plot a graph of R against temperature. Then you can mention things like take repeats, use large range of temperatures for more reliable results, stir water etc.

    If you want to get the I-V characteristic of a component, do the following -

    Connect cell with variable resistor and ammeter in series with voltmeter in parallel with the component.
    For the procedure you vary the variable resistor to a range of resistances, and at each one you measure the voltage and current. You can then plot a graph of V against I. the resistance of the component is the gradient. Again, talk about repeats etc. If the graph is a straight line you know it's an ohmic conductor

    They can't really ask much more for a circuit based 6 mark question, they're usually all the same as the above
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    (Original post by Ayaz789)
    Ohh okay , this is a 3 marker , yesterday that was a 2 marker. Btw how can i draw the component for the water bath?
    \__/
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    (Original post by Ayaz789)
    Ohh okay , this is a 3 marker , yesterday that was a 2 marker. Btw how can i draw the component for the water bath?
    I think there is a mark for drawing in the water bath and thermometer for this one where is the June 10 one didn't require you to do this. I imagine just drawing a box around the component and drawing in the thermometer should be alright
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    \__/
    And do i put that in parallel to the voltmeter?
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    (Original post by TajwarC)
    I think there is a mark for drawing in the water bath and thermometer for this one where is the June 10 one didn't require you to do this. I imagine just drawing a box around the component and drawing in the thermometer should be alright
    Okay thanks! So we replace the variable resistor from last time with a water bath and thermometer?
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    (Original post by Ayaz789)
    Okay thanks! So we replace the variable resistor from last time with a water bath and thermometer?
    Last time was a thermistor remember, this time it's just a piece of wire, the set up and procedure are exactly the same but we're just measuring the resistance of a different component
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    (Original post by TajwarC)
    Last time was a thermistor remember, this time it's just a piece of wire, the set up and procedure are exactly the same but we're just measuring the resistance of a different component
    Okay so i replace the thermistor with a metal wire which is a straight line? How would they know ive drawn a metal wire , and i add a water bath and how would i draw a thermometer too? This is such a headache
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    (Original post by Ayaz789)
    And do i put that in parallel to the voltmeter?
    it's not an electrical component and it's not connected to the circuit - you'll have to draw a hybrid diagram of the circuit mentioned above with something tub shaped around the wire being tested - you can label it 'water bath' and show that it has a source of heat and a thermometer.
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    (Original post by Ayaz789)
    Okay so i replace the thermistor with a metal wire which is a straight line? How would they know ive drawn a metal wire , and i add a water bath and how would i draw a thermometer too? This is such a headache
    Just label it carefully, make it clear to the examiner which part is which. To my knowledge there aren't specific circuit symbols (that the spec requires us to know) that represent water baths or random components such as metal wires.

    If you haven't already read my long post above about the 6 mark questions, they aren't as bad as you think because they're *usually* one experiment or the other.
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    it's not an electrical component and it's not connected to the circuit - you'll have to draw a hybrid diagram of the circuit mentioned above with something tub shaped around the wire being tested - you can label it 'water bath' and show that it has a source of heat and a thermometer.
    I definitely need someone to draw this to understand it :/ Btw look at this
    http://www.egsphysics.co.uk/files/a_...W-MS-JAN08.PDF
    Does it look like 3ai?
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    (Original post by TajwarC)
    Just label it carefully, make it clear to the examiner which part is which. To my knowledge there aren't specific circuit symbols (that the spec requires us to know) that represent water baths or random components such as metal wires.

    If you haven't already read my long post above about the 6 mark questions, they aren't as bad as you think because they're *usually* one experiment or the other.
    Yeah i have read it but im fine with 6 marker , i just dont like drawing the circuit tbh!
 
 
 
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