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    Hi all.
    Soon I will finish my Msc in theoretical Physics and next year I am going to start my PhD in physics of complex systems.

    I have been admitted to two programms:
    - Applied Math at Warwick, dep of Mathematics (1 y Msc+ 3 y PhD)
    - Financial Computing and Analytics at UCL, dep of Computer Science (1y MRes + 3 y PhD)

    In both programmes I will work on a interesting topics related to complex systems applied to finance and real word systems in general and in both programme I will be able to work with very good professors.

    What I would like to know is wich of the two uni will give me more shots with (and is most regarded by) IB banks, hedge funds or consultancy firms .

    Thanks
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    I'd say you can't go wrong with any of the two. I reckon you would have particularly high chances for a quant role in IB/HF/PE.
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    (Original post by Tini123)
    Hi all.
    Soon I will finish my Msc in theoretical Physics and next year I am going to start my PhD in physics of complex systems.

    I have been admitted to two programms:
    - Applied Math at Warwick, dep of Mathematics (1 y Msc+ 3 y PhD)
    - Financial Computing and Analytics at UCL, dep of Computer Science (1y MRes + 3 y PhD)

    In both programmes I will work on a interesting topics related to complex systems applied to finance and real word systems in general and in both programme I will be able to work with very good professors.

    What I would like to know is wich of the two uni will give me more shots with (and is most regarded by) IB banks, hedge funds or consultancy firms .

    Thanks
    Really doesn't matter mate, we're talking about sinking the next 4+ years of your life into a degree programme. You better be choosing one because you like the subject matter.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Really doesn't matter mate, we're talking about sinking the next 4+ years of your life into a degree programme. You better be choosing one because you like the subject matter.

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    Of course, in fact I was also taken at Imperial but in a programme I don't particularly feel comfortable in and so I discarded it.

    This two projects are really the same to me. I still don't know if I am going to leave the University world in my career.

    I was just asking in order to make a choice with as much informations I can gather around.
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    UCL obviously.
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    (Original post by Thomb)
    UCL obviously.
    How in any way is it obvious?

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    How in any way is it obvious?

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    Just from the title.
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    (Original post by Thomb)
    Just from the title.
    I disagree. Pretty much the only employment advantage to doing a PhD (of which there are near enough zero advantages in general) in finance would be if the OP wanted to become a Strat/Quant, and you'll find most teams have PhDs in maths/physics and so, from a title perspective, having a PhD in applied maths would most likely be better - even if both PhD programmes are practically identical.
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    I disagree. Pretty much the only employment advantage to doing a PhD (of which there are near enough zero advantages in general) in finance would be if the OP wanted to become a Strat/Quant, and you'll find most teams have PhDs in maths/physics and so, from a title perspective, having a PhD in applied maths would most likely be better - even if both PhD programmes are practically identical.
    As far as I know, a PhD, is a must if someone wants to become a Quant (and so enter in IB or HF with a non economic degree)
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    (Original post by Tini123)
    As far as I know, a PhD, is a must if someone wants to become a Quant (and so enter in IB or HF with a non economic degree)
    It's pretty much a must now-a-days, just because so many people do PhDs, but you'll find senior Quants that didn't do PhDs, and some exceptional undergrads manage to become (proper) Quants without a PhD, but most end up in Strat roles (although even a slight majority of Strats hired now have PhDs as well).
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    [QUOTE=Noble.;65077149having a PhD in applied maths would most likely be better - even if both PhD programmes are practically identical[/QUOTE]

    Do you think that a CS PhD in Financial Computing and Analytics is less considered than a PhD in App Math even if I got a Msc in theoretical physics?

    I mean in the dep there are more thoretical phycisits and mathematiscians than actual CS experts and also what I will do is in between the two areas not just programming stuff .
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    (Original post by Tini123)
    Do you think that a CS PhD in Financial Computing and Analytics is less considered than a PhD in App Math even if I got a Msc in theoretical physics?

    I mean in the dep there are more thoretical phycisits and mathematiscians than actual CS experts and also what I will do is in between the two areas not just programming stuff .
    I said from a title perspective, not passing any judgement on the content of either programme. HR (or even a Quant) will look at 'Applied Maths' and instantly know it's suitable, the same can't really be said for 'Financial Computing and Analytics' - the title is just more ambiguous and could entail a wide variety of things. I don't actually think it'll make much difference (and it shouldn't influence your decision) but I was just countering the other poster saying you should do the Financial Computing course just because of the title.
 
 
 
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