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    Can someone give me an example of Integral and Peripheral proteins?

    Am I right in thinking that:

    Integral = Channel proteins and Carrier proteins?

    But what about Peripheral proteins?
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    Integral, or intrinsic, proteins are embedded in the phospholipid bilayer and they usually span the entire bilayer (these are called transmembrane proteins). They cannot easily be removed from the bilayer because they have non polar parts which interact with the hydrophobic region -the fatty acid tails, however, they can float freely within it. Yes, you are right in saying channel and carrier proteins are are examples of integral proteins. Glycoproteins are also integral membrane proteins.
    Peripheral, or extrinsic, proteins on the other hand, sit outside the plasma membrane and will either be loosely attached to intrinsic proteins or the polar heads of phospholipids, so they don't interact with the hydrophobic region within the phospholipid bilayer. Examples of these are proteins involved in electron transport chains which i don't think we need to know about at AS biology.
    Hope this helps.
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    (Original post by Najlac)
    Integral, or intrinsic, proteins are embedded in the phospholipid bilayer and they usually span the entire bilayer (these are called transmembrane proteins). They cannot easily be removed from the bilayer because they have non polar parts which interact with the hydrophobic region -the fatty acid tails, however, they can float freely within it. Yes, you are right in saying channel and carrier proteins are are examples of integral proteins. Glycoproteins are also integral membrane proteins.
    Peripheral, or extrinsic, proteins on the other hand, sit outside the plasma membrane and will either be loosely attached to intrinsic proteins or the polar heads of phospholipids, so they don't interact with the hydrophobic region within the phospholipid bilayer. Examples of these are proteins involved in electron transport chains which i don't think we need to know about at AS biology.
    Hope this helps.
    Wow, thanks a lot!! Very descriptive and well explained! Looks like you'll be finding the AS Bio exams easy!! Any tips for the exams? I'm a self-taught mature person so I don't really know what to expect Are you doing Edexcel's new 2015 spec like me by any chance?
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    (Original post by Philip-flop)
    Wow, thanks a lot!! Very descriptive and well explained! Looks like you'll be finding the AS Bio exams easy!! Any tips for the exams? I'm a self-taught mature person so I don't really know what to expect Are you doing Edexcel's new 2015 spec like me by any chance?
    No worries Haha, i actually struggle with the practicals and data analysis and response aspects of the exams.
    I think you should go through the spec and highlight anything you're not 100% sure about, then make notes on those parts using flashcards for key definitions and colourful mind maps. You can also watch youtube videos, I like crash course biology, and try to read around the subject as much as you can using reliable sources (i.e; online documents from universities). Make sure you know the core practicals really well and that you always consider any evaluation issues. With data response questions always try to manipulate the data provided and if asked to explain a trend, you might be expected to provide biological reasoning for the trend. Also, ensure that your answers are relevant to the context provided by the question or a reading section above the questions.
    I'm doing edexcel IAS biology (XBIO1). Good luck with your exam, i'm sure the paper will be structured in a similar way to previous edexcel AS papers!
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    (Original post by Najlac)
    No worries Haha, i actually struggle with the practicals and data analysis and response aspects of the exams.
    I think you should go through the spec and highlight anything you're not 100% sure about, then make notes on those parts using flashcards for key definitions and colourful mind maps. You can also watch youtube videos, I like crash course biology, and try to read around the subject as much as you can using reliable sources (i.e; online documents from universities). Make sure you know the core practicals really well and that you always consider any evaluation issues. With data response questions always try to manipulate the data provided and if asked to explain a trend, you might be expected to provide biological reasoning for the trend. Also, ensure that your answers are relevant to the context provided by the question or a reading section above the questions.
    I'm doing edexcel IAS biology (XBIO1). Good luck with your exam, i'm sure the paper will be structured in a similar way to previous edexcel AS papers!
    Oh wow, so you're an international student! Thanks for the advice. I'm going to be doing as many past papers from now until the exam just to test my memory and practice them data manipulation questions
 
 
 
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