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    Is anyone studying maths or physics at a university in Scotland ? What's the difficulty of the course like ?


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    I've just finished my 4th year of mathematical physics at Heriot Watt which is like a joint degree in maths and physics for the first 3 years before doing more physics in 4th and 5th year. Difficulty is all a matter of perspective and what you're good/bad at. The hardest thing in the degree I've found has been proper analysis while others have struggled with programming or quantum for example. The bottom line is normally that if you're willing to put enough work in and have decent enough ability for maths then you should be absolutely fine.
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    (Original post by qno2)
    I've just finished my 4th year of mathematical physics at Heriot Watt which is like a joint degree in maths and physics for the first 3 years before doing more physics in 4th and 5th year. Difficulty is all a matter of perspective and what you're good/bad at. The hardest thing in the degree I've found has been proper analysis while others have struggled with programming or quantum for example. The bottom line is normally that if you're willing to put enough work in and have decent enough ability for maths then you should be absolutely fine.
    Thanks for the reply! Yeah I'm very interested in studying maths and/or physics at university. Do you mind if I ask what the entry requirements were for you and if you met them ? The university Im interested in says I need an A in maths to pursue the course but I think I may have a B this year, I'm just hoping to make up for it in advanced higher maths so I can be accepted into the university.


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    I think back in my day, you needed AABB at higher including maths and physics for an unconditional offer. I got a bit less than that and got a conditional for BB at advanced higher (maths and physics). Not really sure if it translates over to now though as I believe universities ask for a bit more in general. Just remember that you get 5 choices on your ucas form so you can choose 5 different unis with a range of entry requirements. For physics and maths, that leaves you with 7 I think (Edinburgh, Glasgow, St Andrew's, Heriot Watt, Strathclyde, Aberdeen and Dundee)
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    (Original post by qno2)
    I think back in my day, you needed AABB at higher including maths and physics for an unconditional offer. I got a bit less than that and got a conditional for BB at advanced higher (maths and physics). Not really sure if it translates over to now though as I believe universities ask for a bit more in general. Just remember that you get 5 choices on your ucas form so you can choose 5 different unis with a range of entry requirements. For physics and maths, that leaves you with 7 I think (Edinburgh, Glasgow, St Andrew's, Heriot Watt, Strathclyde, Aberdeen and Dundee)
    Yeah, tbh Herriot Watt looks pretty good they offer all the courses I'm interested in and it's only a 40 minute train ride to Edinburgh. It says I need ABBBB which is quite achievable. But Strathclyde is my preferred choice. Also may I ask what's the difference between mathematical physics and mathematics with physics ?


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    Simply mathematical physics (MP) is a 50/50 spilt (it is a bit more physics-y in the later years) while maths with physics (MwP) is 75/25.

    The actual breakdown is:
    Year 1: MP do labs while MwP do statistics
    Year 2: MP do an EE course (for IoP accreditation) and labs. MwP do an applied maths course (classical mechanics) and pure maths course (number theory and geometry)
    Year 3: MP might be changing for next year so that the only difference would be that MP do "dynamics and relativity" while MwP do "project preparation"
    Year 4: Will probably be changing too. Currently MwP get a choice from all the 4th year maths modules but have to do "quantum and solid state physics". MP do that plus 2 maths module and a few other physics modules that MwP can't do. They also do a larger project.
    MwP has no 5th year so there's no comparison there.
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    (Original post by qno2)
    Simply mathematical physics (MP) is a 50/50 spilt (it is a bit more physics-y in the later years) while maths with physics (MwP) is 75/25.

    The actual breakdown is:
    Year 1: MP do labs while MwP do statistics
    Year 2: MP do an EE course (for IoP accreditation) and labs. MwP do an applied maths course (classical mechanics) and pure maths course (number theory and geometry)
    Year 3: MP might be changing for next year so that the only difference would be that MP do "dynamics and relativity" while MwP do "project preparation"
    Year 4: Will probably be changing too. Currently MwP get a choice from all the 4th year maths modules but have to do "quantum and solid state physics". MP do that plus 2 maths module and a few other physics modules that MwP can't do. They also do a larger project.
    MwP has no 5th year so there's no comparison there.
    Thanks for helping man! Good luck with the rest of your course.


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    (Original post by qno2)
    Simply mathematical physics (MP) is a 50/50 spilt (it is a bit more physics-y in the later years) while maths with physics (MwP) is 75/25.

    The actual breakdown is:
    Year 1: MP do labs while MwP do statistics
    Year 2: MP do an EE course (for IoP accreditation) and labs. MwP do an applied maths course (classical mechanics) and pure maths course (number theory and geometry)
    Year 3: MP might be changing for next year so that the only difference would be that MP do "dynamics and relativity" while MwP do "project preparation"
    Year 4: Will probably be changing too. Currently MwP get a choice from all the 4th year maths modules but have to do "quantum and solid state physics". MP do that plus 2 maths module and a few other physics modules that MwP can't do. They also do a larger project.
    MwP has no 5th year so there's no comparison there.
    Hey there, i know this is a bit late to ask but something recently came to mind. If and when you graduate with your BSc in Mathematical Physics and then lets say you do a PGDE to become a secondary teacher would you be qualified to teach Maths and Physics at high school level ? My physics teacher told me he got his degree in Chemical Physics yet he's only a physics teacher, just want to know as i'm generally quite interested in working with and helping students yet both these subjects really interest me, so would enjoy studying both of them at university.

    Thanks,

    Ross.
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    (Original post by RossB1702)
    Hey there, i know this is a bit late to ask but something recently came to mind. If and when you graduate with your BSc in Mathematical Physics and then lets say you do a PGDE to become a secondary teacher would you be qualified to teach Maths and Physics at high school level ? My physics teacher told me he got his degree in Chemical Physics yet he's only a physics teacher, just want to know as i'm generally quite interested in working with and helping students yet both these subjects really interest me, so would enjoy studying both of them at university.

    Thanks,

    Ross.
    It's quite simple really. You can do your PGCE in 1 or 2 subjects. There's a friend of mine that did maths with physics and is going to do her PGCE in maths and physics at Edinburgh in September so she could teach both. Most universities PGCE websites can give you pretty clear information on exactly how it all works.
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    (Original post by qno2)
    It's quite simple really. You can do your PGCE in 1 or 2 subjects. There's a friend of mine that did maths with physics and is going to do her PGCE in maths and physics at Edinburgh in September so she could teach both. Most universities PGCE websites can give you pretty clear information on exactly how it all works.
    Thanks a lot, this really helped. I think i'll probabably apply for mathrmatical physics at heriot watt university, only thing is i live in Motherwell so it'll probably be a 40 minute train ride every day if i decide to go there, i guess that's worth it.
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    (Original post by RossB1702)
    Thanks a lot, this really helped. I think i'll probabably apply for mathrmatical physics at heriot watt university, only thing is i live in Motherwell so it'll probably be a 40 minute train ride every day if i decide to go there, i guess that's worth it.
    Personally, I'd move to Edinburgh (my parents lived in dunfermline when I started) but if cost is an issue then I understand. There's a guy in my year who gets the train in from Glasgow every day so it's possible though his commute is long.
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    (Original post by qno2)
    Personally, I'd move to Edinburgh (my parents lived in dunfermline when I started) but if cost is an issue then I understand. There's a guy in my year who gets the train in from Glasgow every day so it's possible though his commute is long.
    Yeah my older brother went to edinburgh napier but he didn't move there, he just got on the train everyday.

    My friend said he is gonna apply for Dundee University which is quite far a way from here and said that he wouldn't mind living there for 4 years, nah but 40 minutes on a train everyday ain't that bad, i could handle it. Thanks for the advice though.
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    (Original post by RossB1702)
    Is anyone studying maths or physics at a university in Scotland ? What's the difficulty of the course like ?
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    I just finished my MMath Statistics degree at St Andrews, the modules are basically the same as maths though, it's just if you take more statistics ones you get a statistics degree. Similarly you can graduate in Pure Maths or Applied Maths (though most people don't do this, it's a good option if you find you have a strong preference).

    I found the course quite challenging to start as I hadn't done A-level so the first year modules were focused on catching us up to the RUK students who found them pretty easy. A lot of my friends did physics (our buildings are joined together) and I think they had a lot more work than us over in maths, our Physics department is more well regarded though. An MPhys in Maths & Physics or Maths &Theoretical Physics is also a very popular degree choice.

    Right now our requirements are AAAB at Higher (A in maths), though if you are taking Advanced Highers they will offer direct second year entry or the fast-track course based on AH. If you don't meet those you will still be allowed into first year if you have been accepted.

    Do NOT do the fast-track. It is awful we basically do 4.5 years of study in 4 years so the workload is way too high. Most people bail and end up doing a 4 year BSc or a 5 year MMath. I took a year out in third year and ended up doing a 5 year MMath over 6 years. I don't regret this and it hasn't affected my career or PhD prospects I just wish I hadn't put myself through that!

    Direct second year entry can be a good choice but in both maths and physics it can feel quite stressful as you have less time to adjust, on the other hand it makes it on par, lengthwise, with a degree in the rest of the UK.

    If it helps I got 5A's at Higher and AAB at Advanced Higher (Maths, Physics and French). I received unconditionals on the basis of my Higher grades from St Andrews, Edinburgh, Heriot Watt and Strathclyde (my fifth choice was Cambridge but I cancelled my application as I liked St Andrews better).

    If you have an other questions I'm happy to help. My two best friends recently graduated in Theoretical Physics so I can get more specific info on that as well.
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    (Original post by monkyvirus)
    I just finished my MMath Statistics degree at St Andrews, the modules are basically the same as maths though, it's just if you take more statistics ones you get a statistics degree. Similarly you can graduate in Pure Maths or Applied Maths (though most people don't do this, it's a good option if you find you have a strong preference).

    I found the course quite challenging to start as I hadn't done A-level so the first year modules were focused on catching us up to the RUK students who found them pretty easy. A lot of my friends did physics (our buildings are joined together) and I think they had a lot more work than us over in maths, our Physics department is more well regarded though. An MPhys in Maths & Physics or Maths &Theoretical Physics is also a very popular degree choice.

    Right now our requirements are AAAB at Higher (A in maths), though if you are taking Advanced Highers they will offer direct second year entry or the fast-track course based on AH. If you don't meet those you will still be allowed into first year if you have been accepted.

    Do NOT do the fast-track. It is awful we basically do 4.5 years of study in 4 years so the workload is way too high. Most people bail and end up doing a 4 year BSc or a 5 year MMath. I took a year out in third year and ended up doing a 5 year MMath over 6 years. I don't regret this and it hasn't affected my career or PhD prospects I just wish I hadn't put myself through that!

    Direct second year entry can be a good choice but in both maths and physics it can feel quite stressful as you have less time to adjust, on the other hand it makes it on par, lengthwise, with a degree in the rest of the UK.

    If it helps I got 5A's at Higher and AAB at Advanced Higher (Maths, Physics and French). I received unconditionals on the basis of my Higher grades from St Andrews, Edinburgh, Heriot Watt and Strathclyde (my fifth choice was Cambridge but I cancelled my application as I liked St Andrews better).

    If you have an other questions I'm happy to help. My two best friends recently graduated in Theoretical Physics so I can get more specific info on that as well.
    Thanks for the reply, as for St Andrews i don't think i'll get the grades to go there, i plan on applying for strathclyde, heriot watt, stirling, perhaps dundee but if i go i'd have to live there.
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    (Original post by RossB1702)
    Thanks for the reply, as for St Andrews i don't think i'll get the grades to go there, i plan on applying for strathclyde, heriot watt, stirling, perhaps dundee but if i go i'd have to live there.
    Dundee has great transport links and they've invested a lot in the town centre so it's a really nice place to live (I lived there when I took my year out).

    Fair enough about St Andrews, a lot of people don't consider it so I thought I'd give a break down for you. Of course I realise now it was quite a long post!
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    (Original post by monkyvirus)
    Dundee has great transport links and they've invested a lot in the town centre so it's a really nice place to live (I lived there when I took my year out).

    Fair enough about St Andrews, a lot of people don't consider it so I thought I'd give a break down for you. Of course I realise now it was quite a long post!
    no, it's fine you helped, you told me about the workload of the course. Not sure if it's like that for all universities or just some like St Andrews though.
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    (Original post by monkyvirus)
    I just finished my MMath Statistics degree at St Andrews, the modules are basically the same as maths though, it's just if you take more statistics ones you get a statistics degree. Similarly you can graduate in Pure Maths or Applied Maths (though most people don't do this, it's a good option if you find you have a strong preference).

    I found the course quite challenging to start as I hadn't done A-level so the first year modules were focused on catching us up to the RUK students who found them pretty easy. A lot of my friends did physics (our buildings are joined together) and I think they had a lot more work than us over in maths, our Physics department is more well regarded though. An MPhys in Maths & Physics or Maths &Theoretical Physics is also a very popular degree choice.

    Right now our requirements are AAAB at Higher (A in maths), though if you are taking Advanced Highers they will offer direct second year entry or the fast-track course based on AH. If you don't meet those you will still be allowed into first year if you have been accepted.

    Do NOT do the fast-track. It is awful we basically do 4.5 years of study in 4 years so the workload is way too high. Most people bail and end up doing a 4 year BSc or a 5 year MMath. I took a year out in third year and ended up doing a 5 year MMath over 6 years. I don't regret this and it hasn't affected my career or PhD prospects I just wish I hadn't put myself through that!

    Direct second year entry can be a good choice but in both maths and physics it can feel quite stressful as you have less time to adjust, on the other hand it makes it on par, lengthwise, with a degree in the rest of the UK.

    If it helps I got 5A's at Higher and AAB at Advanced Higher (Maths, Physics and French). I received unconditionals on the basis of my Higher grades from St Andrews, Edinburgh, Heriot Watt and Strathclyde (my fifth choice was Cambridge but I cancelled my application as I liked St Andrews better).

    If you have an other questions I'm happy to help. My two best friends recently graduated in Theoretical Physics so I can get more specific info on that as well.
    Sorry to butt in but saw at the bottom 2 of your friends did theoretical physics, if you dont mind me asking what are they going off to do now?
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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    Sorry to butt in but saw at the bottom 2 of your friends did theoretical physics, if you dont mind me asking what are they going off to do now?
    One of them, graduated 2 years ago, is doing a PhD at Bristol (it's on DNA knotting) and the other, graduated this year, is looking for graduate jobs in the IT, project management and engineering sectors.

    They both graduated with 2:1's.
 
 
 
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