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Does humidity shorten the life span of a light bulb? watch

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    (Original post by Homegrownkitten)
    Could it be that your family uses the kitchen/bathroom lights more than others (i mean turns them on and off more otfen than the others?)
    No because the bulbs nearer the sink or bath tend to burn out quicker. And they are both on the same switch. So they are both on the same amount of hours.

    Its not really a problem I just thought it was an interesting theory which is probably a load of crap.
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    Wouldn't this be better suited in the academic section of the forum?

    What type of light bulb are you talking about? Yes, there are many sorts..
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    I mean't 60c just the general normal operating (from the glass) of a 100w light bulb. Iam just guessing from touching them, however thinking about it I would really burn my hands if I touched a 100w bulb for even a few seconds so I would guess it could be much higher than this.

    I have had so far no luck it finding the stats.
    so does the light bulb gets darker from the inside or from the out side?

    that's ok i believe u are right when u use the energy transfer formula

    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    Its just odd, I have noticed around the house that the bulbs that are near sinks (kitchen and bathroom) have a lesser life span of those that are not. I reason I know this because wired both the fittings so I know old each bulb is.
    Maybe it's that you tend to turn these bulbs on/off more.

    Like in the evening you might go into the kitchen repeatedly but briefly to get a drink, tidy up, cook, get a snack etc, turning the light on & off each time. Same for the bathroom - you would tend to go there several times quite briefly?

    However compared to say your front room, youi might tend to put the light on and then stay there for most of the evening, so the light only goes on/off a few times in the evening, or you might tend to just have the telly on amd maybe a table lamp - compared to kitchen/bathroom where you probably use the main ceiliing lights more.
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    i cant see how that could happen, unless the humidity was cooling the glass down, thus creating microfractures and allowing air to get in

    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    No because the bulbs nearer the sink or bath tend to burn out quicker. And they are both on the same switch. So they are both on the same amount of hours.

    Its not really a problem I just thought it was an interesting theory which is probably a load of crap.

    Dang, in the time it took me to post about this, you already answered my suggestion.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    No because the bulbs nearer the sink or bath tend to burn out quicker. And they are both on the same switch. So they are both on the same amount of hours.

    Its not really a problem I just thought it was an interesting theory which is probably a load of crap.
    it is not crap if u discover this we properly can published this.
    i really do like people like u, taking a interest in everything happen around them. this is the programme i watched on discovery channel, about how people in real life miss thing happening around them
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    (Original post by NDGAARONDI)
    Wouldn't this be better suited in the academic section of the forum?

    What type of light bulb are you talking about? Yes, there are many sorts..
    Both PIR spotlights (with the silver reflective bases and glass covering the casing, the bulb is then inside that) and standard smaller spotlights (I can't remember the name of them now, grrr!)
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    Both PIR spotlights (with the silver reflective bases and glass covering the casing, the bulb is then inside that) and standard smaller spotlights (I can't remember the name of them now, grrr!)
    are they halogen or standard?
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    (Original post by elpaw)
    are they halogen or standard?
    I ones in the bathroom are halogen spotlights, the ones in the kitchen are just standard screw fitting spot lights which are just like normal bulbs but different shape.
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    (Original post by crana)
    Dang, in the time it took me to post about this, you already answered my suggestion.
    Great minds...
    The life of a light bulb generally depends on the amount of times it is turned on and off bue to the sudden electricity flow. Thats why energy efficient bulbs take longer to brighten up. This bloke invented this gadget about 20 years ago and fitted it to his light switches. It introduces a gradual flow of electricity into the bulb. He tried to paitent it but the light bulb manufacterers bought him out as they were worried it would damage their sales. As far as I know this fellow hasnt had to replace a bulb in his house yet. Dont ask me the source this, I cant remeber where I got it from.

    (Original post by Homegrownkitten)
    Great minds...
    The life of a light bulb generally depends on the amount of times it is turned on and off bue to the sudden electricity flow. Thats why energy efficient bulbs take longer to brighten up. This bloke invented this gadget about 20 years ago and fitted it to his light switches. It introduces a gradual flow of electricity into the bulb. He tried to paitent it but the light bulb manufacterers bought him out as they were worried it would damage their sales. As far as I know this fellow hasnt had to replace a bulb in his house yet. Dont ask me the source this, I cant remeber where I got it from.
    what if you have dimmer switches on your lights and turn them up gradually?
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    (Original post by crana)
    what if you have dimmer switches on your lights and turn them up gradually?
    Um... pass
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    (Original post by Homegrownkitten)
    Um... pass
    The only thing about dimmer swithces is that the output voltage is not always stable, (I mean more so than general AC current) you tend to notice the brightness drops or increases slightly sudennly. I wonder if this can shorten the life span.

    PS I have created strangest thread ever here!!

    (Original post by Homegrownkitten)
    Um... pass
    i have a dimmer switch in my room (tho i do turn it on quite fast) and my light has got 3 bulbs - but they always burn out - i onlyhave 1 that actually works at the moment and my room's really dark

    id put new ones in but thy aer special ones and i dont have any and i need to buy some!¬
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    (Original post by crana)
    i have a dimmer switch in my room (tho i do turn it on quite fast) and my light has got 3 bulbs - but they always burn out - i onlyhave 1 that actually works at the moment and my room's really dark

    id put new ones in but thy aer special ones and i dont have any and i need to buy some!¬
    I used to have a dimmer switch in my room and my bulbs burn't out quickly. I have since replaced the switch with a standard rocker.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    PS I have created strangest thread ever here!!
    Yep, but this place was startin to get a bit stale recently. You have brightened the place up (excuse the pun) lol

    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    I used to have a dimmer switch in my room and my bulbs burn't out quickly. I have since replaced the switch with a standard rocker.
    I don't really know why I have a dimmer switch anyway. I have a real thing against lights that aren't properly on. I hate the orangy tinge they give everything. So I never dim my lights anyway.

    I love the way you put 's in random words by the way. It makes me feel like I am reading old fashioned poetry. In a way.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    I used to have a dimmer switch in my room and my bulbs burn't out quickly. I have since replaced the switch with a standard rocker.
    burn't??

    Maybe it isn't the bulbs themselves that are affected by the humidity, maybe it gets into the contacts and the fittings.
    I haven't a clue whether any of this is anywhere close to truth, but water and electricity never produce good results, so maybe you're onto something!

    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    No because the bulbs nearer the sink or bath tend to burn out quicker. And they are both on the same switch. So they are both on the same amount of hours.

    Its not really a problem I just thought it was an interesting theory which is probably a load of crap.

    I reckon though that in your average kitchen, bulbs near the kettle or stove would be in a more humid environment than the sink, because (in our house anyway) we usually run cold water in the sink mainly just to wash things, but often have kettle/pans with lots of steam.

    I spose if you do lots of washing up in very hot water tho then the sink area would be more humid - but I'd still expect bulbs near stove/kettle to be affected.
 
 
 
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