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A Level law vs BTEC applied Law watch

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    I'm considering taking law as an option at a-level but I'd like to understand the difference between these two subjects other than the btec is 100% coursework. At my college I have to take an elective and BTEC applied law is an option. Could someone help me here 😩
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    BTEC looks a bit easier and more practical.
    The A level is more academic.
    http://wyke.ac.uk/course/btec-level-3-applied-law/
    http://wyke.ac.uk/course/a-level-law/

    If you plan to go to Uni, then the A level will be harder but more highly regarded. All coursework v all exam is a big difference. It seems from that link it wont stop you getting to Uni, but a good grade at A level would be more useful.
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    Having chosen Btec applied science over biology, I do not recommend taking the Btec over an alevel. Btec was previously regarded as the easy option however due to the new changes it has been made equivalent of alevel. So if you were going to learn all the Btec content why not just pick the alevel. Also I assume you will be taking this course starting in september and Btec qualifications will have an exam on a unit, which will be essentially the same content as the alevel. However it depends on what you are comfortable in, check university requirements and what they prefer ring up or email. Its worth speaking to a teacher/careers advisor.
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    I take BTEC Applied Law as a fourth subject alongside English Lit, History, and Politics.

    First of all, don't worry about it 'not being respected'. I recently contacted London School of Economics about whether they accept the BTEC as a fourth subject, because they say they expect all applicants to have completed at least four subjects at AS level. They also accept the BTEC!

    What you don't want to do though is take it as one of only three subjects, meaning that if you drop one of your four subjects after your AS year, make sure it's Law. 2 full A-levels and a BTEC is not quite as good as 3 full A-levels. Though, a number of decent unis do accept that combination.

    About the course itself. You have an assignment to complete every 2 weeks. The full course is split up into 6 units, and you complete three in each year. If you drop it after the first year, you get a 'Certificate'. If you do all 6 units, you get a 'Subsidiary Diploma'. I will attest that BTEC Law is very, very easy. Your teacher will probably give you some notes, and all you're really doing is a copy-and-paste task from the notes to your work. Sometimes you have to apply concepts to case studies.

    The average grade people in my sixth form get is Distinction*. That's not because of the sixth form, because their average A-level grade is a C, but because the course is so so easy.

    Anyway, A-level Law is hardly a respected subject. I'd say they're pretty equal. Maybe even BTEC has an advantage. Maybe.

    I say take it as a fourth subject. It's easy UCAS points, really. It takes so little work that you'll probably be able to take all four subjects onto your second year quite comfortably. In fact, there were people in my class who finished around March, two-three months before the deadline. They were then able to just spend their class time revising other subjects.

    It also does teach you relevant stuff! Like tonight, for instance, when Bobby Beale got charged with Grievous Bodily Harm With Intent on EastEnders, I knew what that was and was able to explain it.

    No exams takes a whole lot of the stress off too.
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    (Original post by frosties27)
    Also I assume you will be taking this course starting in september and Btec qualifications will have an exam on a unit, which will be essentially the same content as the a level
    Oh yeah, I forgot about that...

    Still, I maintain that BTEC Law is a good subject to take as a fourth subject. You'll still have less pressure than a regular A-level because it will still be mainly coursework.
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    go for btec if you have a mental challenged or have learning difficulties

    a level is for normal people
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    (Original post by *****pleasee)
    go for btec if you have a mental challenged or have learning difficulties

    a level is for normal people
    You better do BTEC then.
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    (Original post by *****pleasee)
    go for btec if you have a mental challenged or have learning difficulties

    a level is for normal people
    Clearly thats true when BTEC is statistically more employable than A levels and my Computing BTEC got me onto an MSci Computer Science degree at a top 20 uni and a good Software Engineerig placement, A levels mean nothing in the real world
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    (Original post by yt7777)
    Clearly thats true when BTEC is statistically more employable than A levels and my Computing BTEC got me onto an MSci Computer Science degree at a top 20 uni and a good Software Engineerig placement, A levels mean nothing in the real world
    We are talking about Law here.
    How many students have A levels when it comes to the top Law schools?
    How many have solicitors have A levels?
    You can even take that as a % of students who took each type of exam.

    A levels can mean quite a lot in the real world.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    We are talking about Law here.
    How many students have A levels when it comes to the top Law schools?
    How many have solicitors have A levels?
    You can even take that as a % of students who took each type of exam.

    A levels can mean quite a lot in the real world.
    OP would be taking BTEC Law alongside A-levels.

    Now, both BTEC Law and A-level Law are utterly useless for doing Law at university. You can hardly say that any good university looks highly upon a Law A-level.

    Yes, you're right in saying that you need A-levels to be competitive in Law. But remember, OP will have a levels! He'll just have BTEC Law as well.

    There is absolutely nothing wrong with taking a combination of A-levels and BTEC, and many good universities accept such a combination.

    OP should take BTEC Law as a fourth option. LSE say that you need four subjects at AS at least, and I contacted them recently about BTEC Law as a fourth subject. They accept it!

    About a month ago I went to Cambridge's Law Masterclass. I asked the admissions officer about BTEC Law as a fourth subject. He praised it as evidence of showing an interest in the subject! Cambridge!

    If OP were considering taking BTEC Law as one of only three subjects, then I would advise him to reconsider. But as a fourth subject, BTEC Law is a very good option. It even has an advantage over A-level Law, because there are some universities that 'blacklist' A-level Law, but allow you to combine BTEC and A-levels, in which case BTEC Law has an advantage over A-level Law.

    Have a look at my above post.
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    OP would be taking BTEC Law alongside A-levels.

    Now, both BTEC Law and A-level Law are utterly useless for doing Law at university. You can hardly say that any good university looks highly upon a Law A-level.

    Yes, you're right in saying that you need A-levels to be competitive in Law. But remember, OP will have a levels! He'll just have BTEC Law as well.

    There is absolutely nothing wrong with taking a combination of A-levels and BTEC, and many good universities accept such a combination.

    OP should take BTEC Law as a fourth option. LSE say that you need four subjects at AS at least, and I contacted them recently about BTEC Law as a fourth subject. They accept it!

    About a month ago I went to Cambridge's Law Masterclass. I asked the admissions officer about BTEC Law as a fourth subject. He praised it as evidence of showing an interest in the subject! Cambridge!

    If OP were considering taking BTEC Law as one of only three subjects, then I would advise him to reconsider. But as a fourth subject, BTEC Law is a very good option. It even has an advantage over A-level Law, because there are some universities that 'blacklist' A-level Law, but allow you to combine BTEC and A-levels, in which case BTEC Law has an advantage over A-level Law.

    Have a look at my above post.
    I have no issues if its a 4th. Didnt see him saying he was taking it as a 4th,
    Didnt see they were applying to LSE.
    Law at A level is treated with a bit of sceptcism for Law school entry.
    They would be better off with an EPQ imo.

    Anyway you seem to know your stuff what is needed, so will leave you to it.
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    Actually everything that everyone on here has said is absolutely wrong. If you look for the level 3 applied law extended... You can just take that course but has to be the extended... As it is equivalent to the law a levels, is worth 3 a levels it's just assiment based. You can even get into Oxford with BTEC law as I have looked into it but you need to get DDD. Personally I prefer btec to exams as most uni work is assiment based anyway and they both will teach you core and nesciary components of law. At some Unis the entrance for law is only dmm.
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    (Original post by Benny97th)
    Actually everything that everyone on here has said is absolutely wrong. If you look for the level 3 applied law extended... You can just take that course but has to be the extended... As it is equivalent to the law a levels, is worth 3 a levels it's just assiment based. You can even get into Oxford with BTEC law as I have looked into it but you need to get DDD. Personally I prefer btec to exams as most uni work is assiment based anyway and they both will teach you core and nesciary components of law. At some Unis the entrance for law is only dmm.
    Care to tell us which unis those are ? You do realise not every uni has the same policy with regard to BTEC? Seing as everyone else is wrong ifc.

    You are speaking as a current BTEC student, rather than a graduate?

    Think you will find the vast majority if not all uni work is exam based apart from your dissertation.
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    Yes I am right they is lots of unis which accept BTEC qualifications. For example Bristol university, Oxford university, all manchester universities, there are even 2 unis in London which accept btecs. There are so many unis which accept btecs. Think you will find that most unis do most of the work by coursework usually 60 to 40% a year depending on what course you are taking. Doesn't matter whether I am a graduate or not. The facts are now that most unis accept btecs. Depending on what uni you want to go to for example I know in law the start entrance for a level 3 law is a DMM = ABB and goes all the way up to DDD = AAA but to get into some universities such as Oxford and Bristol you need to get top marks which are DDD. It really depends on what course the individual wants to take at university entrance can be higher or lower
 
 
 
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