AS English Literature A Paper 2 (7711/2) : Love Through the Ages:Prose 26TH MAY Watch

edward99
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How would you structure and analyse Unseen Prose (SECTION A)?

Also how would you structure Section B: Comparing Prose texts?

Both for top band marks?
The Prose texts I have studied are Tess of D'Urbervilles and A Room With A View
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brozza981
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Hi! I'm doing Tess of The D'Urbervilles too, but with The Great Gatsby.
I created two short courses on Memrise to help me learn critical quotations and only a few short quotes themselves so that I wouldn't have to struggle in the exam, although we do have the texts.
http://www.memrise.com/course/1096175/tess-of-the-durbervilles-quotations/
http://www.memrise.com/course/1087163/tess-of-the-durbervilles-10-critical-quotations/


For each essay, use the assessment objectives as a reminder for what to write (they are what you are marked on). These are EACCI to learn (hahaha):
AO1) Expression - how well you convey your ideas
AO2) Analysis - how well you explain your ideas
AO3) Context - how well you explain the context of each text and how it relates to your ideas
AO4) Connections - how the text compares to other texts you have read (don't worry about this in unseen -my teacher contacted AQA and they said that through having a good critical writing style, your understanding of other texts would be clear - so think of this one as showing the examiner you have read lots of books, even if you haven't!)
AO5) Interpretations - how you contrast your ideas with exactly the opposite ones, helpfully backed up by critics - for example "Hardy presents Angel as a godlike figure, but as literary theorist R Williams believed, Angel,despite being a gentleman, is a sexual magnet like the antagonistic Alec".


Because you're most likely using your books next year, I recommend in the exam to annotate the book, folding over pages etc, but in pencil (even in erasable coloured pencils ooh) so that it can be rubbed out. Just remember to write your actual essay in black pen!

Also in the exam, annotate and plan for 10 minutes at the start. This may feel like a while, but it means you will be able to write a higher level essay.
You should GASP when you open the paper! Not physically, but in the unseen, note the Genre, Audience, Subject, and Purpose of the text. This is useful in helping you understand a text you have never read.

When I’m stuck for ideas in making a plan, I just write a table or spider diagram with one side saying “Yes”and the other “No” (or “Agree” and “Disagree” in terms of the question) – then, your knowledge of the text should just take you anywhere you want to go.
Or at least, your knowledge of the plot will aid you so that you can quickly flick to where quotes you want mightbe.
Aim for 3-5 main points in your plan (which can branch out to sub points) and plan so that you begin with the point you least agree with, and end with the one you believe in most. This makes your essay sound more like a well-researched one.

Then on essay format:
In your introduction, start with a thesis that grabs the attention of the examiner. This line shouldn't sound like a Buzzfeed article, but should engage any reader who knows the text and make them think "Wow, really?" or "What a bold statement!".
In your introduction you should begin with the interpretation(AO5 eyyy) you don't agree with, and slowly build to the end of your intro with the idea that you do.
The exemplar answer from AQA even follows this technique:
"Stereotypically,women are portrayed as the weaker sex in pre-1900 literature and they often suffer and endure unhappy marriages because of the inequality of the sexes.
Bold statement/thesis
In post-1900 literature,however, women are shown as more equal and so writers don't focus on their suffering alone but also on the suffering of male characters in relationships.
Contrasts original idea
This is true of The Great Gatsby and The Rotters' Club where women do suffer and endure but arguably men are presented as suffering even more."
true idea is brought forward

For each paragraph, you should begin with a topic sentence - a sentence that summarises your argument for that paragraph. Then, get to the juicy argument that uses all of the AOs and your plan. Use CQA – Comment, Quote,Analysis – to make EVERY point (a quote for every point), and relate EVERY point back to the question. Then, finish with a mini summary, or something that sounds like you’re ending the paragraph, but leading onto your…

Next point! This should connect with the previous paragraph in its topic sentence, and then follow the same format.

After making your points from your plan, you need to write a conclusion. I remember some great advice given to me – your conclusion should be longer than your introduction, just as yourbutt is bigger that your head. Your butt is where your food’s journey ends. So will it be the end of a literary journey.
DON’T ever say “In summary,” or “In conclusion” or anything like that. This reminds the examiner that they are reading a paper written by a teenager, and that they are working. Don’t make the examiner work. Let them think of your great exam as a gift!
Instead of panicking about sounding like a conclusion, I personally like just to rephrase my introduction(?) in a way that isn’t actually literally rephrasing my introduction. You just use it for inspiration because, hey, there is a time limit here. So: start with a bold statement, then run through your paragraphs (the whole “points you disagree with, moving onto points you love” flow) in paraphrasing the topic sentences,inking each point even here, and end by relating your answer to the question for a final time.
Hope this helped! It helped me, running over it lol. Good luck
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edward99
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(Original post by brozza981)
Hi! I'm doing Tess of The D'Urbervilles too, but with The Great Gatsby.
I created two short courses on Memrise to help me learn critical quotations and only a few short quotes themselves so that I wouldn't have to struggle in the exam, although we do have the texts.
http://www.memrise.com/course/1096175/tess-of-the-durbervilles-quotations/
http://www.memrise.com/course/1087163/tess-of-the-durbervilles-10-critical-quotations/


For each essay, use the assessment objectives as a reminder for what to write (they are what you are marked on). These are EACCI to learn (hahaha):
AO1) Expression - how well you convey your ideas
AO2) Analysis - how well you explain your ideas
AO3) Context - how well you explain the context of each text and how it relates to your ideas
AO4) Connections - how the text compares to other texts you have read (don't worry about this in unseen -my teacher contacted AQA and they said that through having a good critical writing style, your understanding of other texts would be clear - so think of this one as showing the examiner you have read lots of books, even if you haven't!)
AO5) Interpretations - how you contrast your ideas with exactly the opposite ones, helpfully backed up by critics - for example "Hardy presents Angel as a godlike figure, but as literary theorist R Williams believed, Angel,despite being a gentleman, is a sexual magnet like the antagonistic Alec".


Because you're most likely using your books next year, I recommend in the exam to annotate the book, folding over pages etc, but in pencil (even in erasable coloured pencils ooh) so that it can be rubbed out. Just remember to write your actual essay in black pen!

Also in the exam, annotate and plan for 10 minutes at the start. This may feel like a while, but it means you will be able to write a higher level essay.
You should GASP when you open the paper! Not physically, but in the unseen, note the Genre, Audience, Subject, and Purpose of the text. This is useful in helping you understand a text you have never read.
When I’m stuck for ideas in making a plan, I just write a table or spider diagram with one side saying “Yes”and the other “No” (or “Agree” and “Disagree” in terms of the question) – then, your knowledge of the text should just take you anywhere you want to go.
Or at least, your knowledge of the plot will aid you so that you can quickly flick to where quotes you want mightbe.
Aim for 3-5 main points in your plan (which can branch out to sub points) and plan so that you begin with the point you least agree with, and end with the one you believe in most. This makes your essay sound more like a well-researched one.

Then on essay format:
In your introduction, start with a thesis that grabs the attention of the examiner. This line shouldn't sound like a Buzzfeed article, but should engage any reader who knows the text and make them think "Wow, really?" or "What a bold statement!".
In your introduction you should begin with the interpretation(AO5 eyyy) you don't agree with, and slowly build to the end of your intro with the idea that you do.
The exemplar answer from AQA even follows this technique:
"Stereotypically,women are portrayed as the weaker sex in pre-1900 literature and they often suffer and endure unhappy marriages because of the inequality of the sexes.
Bold statement/thesis
In post-1900 literature,however, women are shown as more equal and so writers don't focus on their suffering alone but also on the suffering of male characters in relationships.
Contrasts original idea
This is true of The Great Gatsby and The Rotters' Club where women do suffer and endure but arguably men are presented as suffering even more."
true idea is brought forward

For each paragraph, you should begin with a topic sentence - a sentence that summarises your argument for that paragraph. Then, get to the juicy argument that uses all of the AOs and your plan. Use CQA – Comment, Quote,Analysis – to make EVERY point (a quote for every point), and relate EVERY point back to the question. Then, finish with a mini summary, or something that sounds like you’re ending the paragraph, but leading onto your…

Next point! This should connect with the previous paragraph in its topic sentence, and then follow the same format.

After making your points from your plan, you need to write a conclusion. I remember some great advice given to me – your conclusion should be longer than your introduction, just as yourbutt is bigger that your head. Your butt is where your food’s journey ends. So will it be the end of a literary journey.
DON’T ever say “In summary,” or “In conclusion” or anything like that. This reminds the examiner that they are reading a paper written by a teenager, and that they are working. Don’t make the examiner work. Let them think of your great exam as a gift!
Instead of panicking about sounding like a conclusion, I personally like just to rephrase my introduction(?) in a way that isn’t actually literally rephrasing my introduction. You just use it for inspiration because, hey, there is a time limit here. So: start with a bold statement, then run through your paragraphs (the whole “points you disagree with, moving onto points you love” flow) in paraphrasing the topic sentences,inking each point even here, and end by relating your answer to the question for a final time.
Hope this helped! It helped me, running over it lol. Good luck
You are such a G, thank you
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GACACIA
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Hi guys! how did you find the paper, & what were questions again? I'm trying to remember them, but it's vague
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