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    Can anyone please tell me what the organic products are of the following reactions: A) 2-bromo-2-methylpropane under reflux with hot solution of potassium hydroxide in ethanol. B) 1-iodopropane with an aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide. C) 1-bromopropane with excess ammonia in ethanol. D) butane-1, 4-diol with acidified potassium dichromate (vi) under reflux conditions. E) cyclohexanol with phosphorus(v) chloride. Thank you.
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    Not going to tell you the answers, but here is what is happening in each. I suggest you draw out what you start and draw a mechanism to see what your product(s) is (except D and E).

    A) This is the elimination of HBr from 2-bromo-2-methylpropane to form an alkene
    B) This is the nucleophilic substitution of the halogen, also referred to as hydrolysis
    C) This is also a nucleophilic substitution where ammonia (NH3) is the nucleophile
    D) This is an oxidation of two hydroxyl (OH) groups. If you were to oxidise butan-1-ol you would end up with butanal.
    E) This is a substitution reaction where chloride replaces the hydroxyl group.
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    (Original post by Farseer)

    A) This is the elimination of HBr from 2-bromo-2-methylpropane to form an alkene

    D) This is an oxidation of two hydroxyl (OH) groups. If you were to oxidise butan-1-ol you would end up with butanal.
    You're are right but why isnt A a hydrolysis reaction?

    Also under reflux doesnt butan-1,4-diol turn into a dicarboxylic acid
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    (Original post by SaltandSugar)
    You're are right but why isnt A a hydrolysis reaction?
    Truth is is that you might get some hydrolysis - however, it's a tertiary haloalkane and in an alcoholic solvent - both encourage elimination over substitution :yep:

    Also under reflux doesnt butan-1,4-diol turn into a dicarboxylic acid
    Yep, via the dialdehyde
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    (Original post by Farseer)
    Not going to tell you the answers, but here is what is happening in each. I suggest you draw out what you start and draw a mechanism to see what your product(s) is (except D and E).

    A) This is the elimination of HBr from 2-bromo-2-methylpropane to form an alkene
    B) This is the nucleophilic substitution of the halogen, also referred to as hydrolysis
    C) This is also a nucleophilic substitution where ammonia (NH3) is the nucleophile
    D) This is an oxidation of two hydroxyl (OH) groups. If you were to oxidise butan-1-ol you would end up with butanal.
    E) This is a substitution reaction where chloride replaces the hydroxyl group.
    Thank you so much
 
 
 
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