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    In a nutshell I don't think I'd feel too happy getting a B in any of my exams and it makes me a bit annoyed for two reasons. It makes me sound like a snob and to most people a B isn't a bad grade. Has anybody felt like this and how did you sort of solve it? Thanks.
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    Don't worry about it, aiming high is fine, just don't be too upset if you don't achieve the grades you wanted. Also, unless you're planning on going to Oxford or Cambridge the reality is that your gcse's stop being important the moment you get onto an A level course. Just enjoy your courses before you descend into the pit of fiery hell that is A-levels
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    I felt exactly the same a year ago! My predicted grades were all As and Bs but I told myself that I was going to aim for all A*s and As. In the run up to the exams I panicked and started taking revision seriously (you couldn't see my wall for notes by the time of the first exam) and it paid off Last minute motivation is a wonder, honestly. Just keep on going over your notes and do extra reading on stuff that interests you because you'll remember it better. Good luck!
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    I probably won't be happy with a B either, but that's okay!
    Don't worry about what other people think of you and your expectations - just work hard on your GCSEs and get the best grades that you can. You can use your high expectations as motivation to revise
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    Well yk the truth is no-one cares what grades you get. Its not about what grades you get its how much effort you put in. Dont comapre yourself to other peoples grades becauase every1 is different. Your grades dont define who you are as a person. As long as you try your best no-one cares what you get. x

    GOOD LUCK FOR YOUR EXAMS

    Aim high but dont expect too much, that way you'll do good and you'll also be ahppy about the grades you get.
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    omg we are exactly the same, i tell people omg if i get Bs in my gcse i will die and they're like omg B is a good grade and im just like... okeh

    i really need an A in english especially and im stressing out. every single day im crying myself to sleep because of it :/
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    Believe me, aiming for above a B isn't bad. My familly expects me to get all A*, and I won't lie; I really want that! It causes a bit of conflict sometimes with other people though, because like you said, some people think that a B is a respectable grade (an awesome grade for those being predicted Cs, Ds and below), and I'm happy for them, but if I got a B I'd be pissed, so that kinda makes me look like a big hypocrite. To deal with it, I tend to just tell anybody who looks uncomfortable that I just hate getting under my target grade, and that seems to deal with it pretty well. No matter what grade your target is, getting over it will make you glad, and getting under it will make you sad, so it's the perfect why to wriggle out of awkward situations!
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    (Original post by MattThomas)
    Don't worry about it, aiming high is fine, just don't be too upset if you don't achieve the grades you wanted. Also, unless you're planning on going to Oxford or Cambridge the reality is that your gcse's stop being important the moment you get onto an A level course. Just enjoy your courses before you descend into the pit of fiery hell that is A-levels
    Not really, especially with the linearised A-levels...
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    (Original post by RayApparently)
    Not really, especially with the linearised A-levels...
    Universities like Cambridge who relied more on AS grades are introducing entrance tests for applicants so GCSE grades still aren't that much more important with the linearised A Levels.
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    (Original post by george_c00per)
    Universities like Cambridge who relied more on AS grades are introducing entrance tests for applicants so GCSE grades still aren't that much more important with the linearised A Levels.
    I'm talking about universities besides Oxford and Cambridge - see the post I replied to.

    All the top universities consider GCSE results - some, such as the LSE, put more weight on them than others. It's disingenuous to say otherwise - we should encourage GCSE students to make the most of this opportunity to shine.
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    if you've got to the point where straight A* is impossible then focus on the subjects you're taking further next year.
    at the beginning i aimed for A* in literature, got A/A* in coursework and unit 1, but unit 2 dont look so bright. it doesnt bother me though, i know the amount of work i put in will reflect my grade for the exam this friday so its only my fault :P look around the situation! dont be hard on yourself, life doesn't revolve around gcses
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    I'm the exact same as you- or at least, I was, until I sat my Chemistry C1 and messed it up big time.

    When I started my GCSEs, I was hoping for 15A*, despite only being predicted 6A* and 9A. Now to me, a B is a grade which I really don't want, and I have said that if I get a C in absolutely anything, I'm retaking it.

    However, I personally said to myself that I wanted to get into Oxford and try and get 15A*, or at the very least 10. Of course, I now realise that that is highly unlikely.

    And so I have made it more liberal; I still don't want to get a B, but it's all about saying to yourself "If I can easily get an A*, dependent on how much or how little revision I do, then, yeah, that's cool. But if I get an A, it's still better than a lot of people, and if I get a B, still so."

    It's all about realising you've set your goals too high, which you've clearly done. So now you've got to truly say to yourself "What have I set too high?" If you know that there is a very slim chance of you getting, say, an A* in Chemistry [just an example] because you've messed up C1, then tell yourself you'll work towards an A.

    But for 'good' results, make sure not to aim, as much as it might seem necessary, for all A*. This will just throw you into a state of annoyance whenever you get something wrong, and if you're anything like me, you'll become overly ill and either have to be sent to hospital or at the very least have an emotional breakdown. And you shouldn't put yourself through that.

    Good luck!
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    Wasn't like that at GCSEs but in my AS Levels yeahh. I started really wanting to get As and then being irritated when I kept getting stuck at B grade in Philosophy.

    I don't think it's bad to aim high, but sometimes we do need to have a reality check and accept that a B grade is not a bad grade either. Though needless to say I will probably be disappointed this August as I doubt I will achieve the AAA I was predicted
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    (Original post by AxSirlotl)
    In a nutshell I don't think I'd feel too happy getting a B in any of my exams and it makes me a bit annoyed for two reasons. It makes me sound like a snob and to most people a B isn't a bad grade. Has anybody felt like this and how did you sort of solve it? Thanks.
    This probably won't help much but one B certainly isn't a bad thing, and as long as you have a large proportion of As and A*s you're at no real advantage to other students - I've said this before to someone on here, but you can be accepted to good universities with only around 2 A*s whereas someone with 15 A*s can be rejected for the exact same course and university.
    It may seem as though everything is on these exams, but they're really not.

    There was a time that I thought that getting Bs were bad, but I've done a lot of research on what people got in GCSEs vs. where they were accepted into uni, and lots got Bs in languages, English, etc. but still were allowed to go on to crazy competitive courses like NatSci at Cambridge or PPE at Oxford. It really isn't the end of the world, and the B is usually most likely to be in your weakest subject anyway which you aren't planning on taking at A Levels.
 
 
 
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