US nuclear arsenal is ran by floppy disk

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HucktheForde
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#1
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#1
I first saw this on fox news and i didnt believe it. then i saw it on guardian... cant be fake now :rofl:

The US military’s nuclear arsenal is controlled by computers built in the 1970s that still use 8in floppy disks.

A report into the state of the US government, released by congressional investigators, has revealed that the country is spending around $60bn (£40.8bn) to maintain museum-ready computers, which many do not even know how to operate any more, as their creators retire.

The Defense Department’s Strategic Automated Command and Control System (DDSACCS), which is used to send and receive emergency action messages to US nuclear forces, runs on a 1970s IBM computing platform. It still uses 8in floppy disks to store data.

We’re not even talking the more modern 3.5in floppy disk that millennials might only know as the save icon. We’re talking the OG 8in floppy, which was a largefloppy square with a magnetic disk inside it. They became commercially available in 1971, but were replaced by the 5¼in floppy in 1976, and by the more familiar hard plastic 3.5in floppy in 1982.

Shockingly, the US Government Accountability Office said: “Replacement parts for the system are difficult to find because they are now obsolete.”

https://www.theguardian.com/technolo...n-floppy-disks
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the bear
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#2
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#2
(Original post by HucktheForde)
I first saw this on fox news and i didnt believe it. then i saw it on guardian... cant be fake now :rofl:

The US military’s nuclear arsenal is controlled by computers built in the 1970s that still use 8in floppy disks.

A report into the state of the US government, released by congressional investigators, has revealed that the country is spending around $60bn (£40.8bn) to maintain museum-ready computers, which many do not even know how to operate any more, as their creators retire.

The Defense Department’s Strategic Automated Command and Control System (DDSACCS), which is used to send and receive emergency action messages to US nuclear forces, runs on a 1970s IBM computing platform. It still uses 8in floppy disks to store data.

We’re not even talking the more modern 3.5in floppy disk that millennials might only know as the save icon. We’re talking the OG 8in floppy, which was a largefloppy square with a magnetic disk inside it. They became commercially available in 1971, but were replaced by the 5¼in floppy in 1976, and by the more familiar hard plastic 3.5in floppy in 1982.

Shockingly, the US Government Accountability Office said: “Replacement parts for the system are difficult to find because they are now obsolete.”

https://www.theguardian.com/technolo...n-floppy-disks
i know where they can get an 8" floppy :smug:
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Tempest II
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#3
I've used machines in ATC the last few years that make Windows 95 look new so I'm not remotely surprised.
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2016_GCSE
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#4
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At least good old floppy's can't be hacked into.

Image
Kim Jong Un underestimates the USA.
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joey11223
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#5
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#5
Not surprised, company I work for has computers running windows xp and won't run things in compatibility mode or virtual PC. They don't want to upgrade the OS since it would mean getting newer versions of software, for the forseeable that won't change, and neither will the computers if they're repairable, they're all a decade old at least. I could imagine things limping along in xp for decades...
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ODES_PDES
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Great to know
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the bear
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#7
the Cave™ is XP based :smug:... it did consider changing to Ubuntu... indeed when "Stephen from Microsoft" rings up to inform the Cave™ that its computer has been attacked, the Cave™ replies that it has just switched to Linux :rofl:
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simon_g
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(Original post by ODES_PDES)
Great to know
?
a lot of critically important software runs on older computers.
Minix, QNX and other OSs do not require quad-core cpu with 16gb ram to do their job properly. Audits take time and a lot of money, using well-tested software is essential. also, being properly cut-off of the internet is much safer too (fewer surfaces to attack).
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Tootles
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#9
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#9
(Original post by HucktheForde)
I first saw this on fox news and i didnt believe it. then i saw it on guardian... cant be fake now :rofl:

The US military’s nuclear arsenal is controlled by computers built in the 1970s that still use 8in floppy disks.

A report into the state of the US government, released by congressional investigators, has revealed that the country is spending around $60bn (£40.8bn) to maintain museum-ready computers, which many do not even know how to operate any more, as their creators retire.

The Defense Department’s Strategic Automated Command and Control System (DDSACCS), which is used to send and receive emergency action messages to US nuclear forces, runs on a 1970s IBM computing platform. It still uses 8in floppy disks to store data.

We’re not even talking the more modern 3.5in floppy disk that millennials might only know as the save icon. We’re talking the OG 8in floppy, which was a largefloppy square with a magnetic disk inside it. They became commercially available in 1971, but were replaced by the 5¼in floppy in 1976, and by the more familiar hard plastic 3.5in floppy in 1982.

Shockingly, the US Government Accountability Office said: “Replacement parts for the system are difficult to find because they are now obsolete.”

https://www.theguardian.com/technolo...n-floppy-disks
TBF if it works why replace it? They built hardware to last forever back in those days.
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Aj12
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#10
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#10
(Original post by ODES_PDES)
Great to know
If it ain't broke don't fix it. The planes dropping some of those nukes may well be older than the parents of the guys flying them. You just need to look at the F35 or even the NHS's IT system upgrades to see how difficult it can be to update your technology. If there is no good reason to then why go through the hassle?
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natninja
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#11
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#11
I've previously worked on software to go out to oilfields in russia and china and it had to be pre-win95 compatible... so I'm hardly surprised at all
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Jebedee
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#12
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#12
I would imagine having some things run on ancient systems is probably the most secure option available.
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