Sikh-Muslim marriage Watch

Anonymous #1
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Is it very common in areas with a lot of Sikhs, like the West Midlands and London?

Where I am living there are very few Sikhs and a lot of Muslims, and I am Sikh guy that is currently hoping to marry a Muslim girl in my University.

I have mentioned it to quite a few friends, and none of my Sikh friends spoke against it. Some said, 'It would be more simple to marry someone in the same religion, however I don't have anything against what you want to do.' To be honest most of my Sikh friends are very liberal in their views.

The problem is a handful(not most) of my Muslim friends are literally objecting to it. They are saying things like, 'This is an act against God.', and 'You're going to be ruining someone's life.' and telling me that I simply can't proceed with this.

I honestly don't see what's wrong with it. My parents are also fine with it. But I don't know what to do now.
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Synonym
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forget those mates.... just go for it if both you and your girlfriend agree and want it
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SMEGGGY
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Are you going to convert

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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by SMEGGGY)
Are you going to convert

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Nope, I'm not. But I am aware that their religion expects a conversion before marriage.
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SMEGGGY
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Nope, I'm not. But I am aware that their religion expects a conversion before marriage.
You willing to do that? What does your gf say? Does her family know she's seeing you?

Are you a,practicing Sikh? Do you read Gurbani

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cupcakes87
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I think that if both you and your gf and bothfamilies are happy then you should go for it
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Peroxidation
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Is it very common in areas with a lot of Sikhs, like the West Midlands and London?

Where I am living there are very few Sikhs and a lot of Muslims, and I am Sikh guy that is currently hoping to marry a Muslim girl in my University.

I have mentioned it to quite a few friends, and none of my Sikh friends spoke against it. Some said, 'It would be more simple to marry someone in the same religion, however I don't have anything against what you want to do.' To be honest most of my Sikh friends are very liberal in their views.

The problem is a handful(not most) of my Muslim friends are literally objecting to it. They are saying things like, 'This is an act against God.', and 'You're going to be ruining someone's life.' and telling me that I simply can't proceed with this.

I honestly don't see what's wrong with it. My parents are also fine with it. But I don't know what to do now.
What your muslim friends don't understand is that all religions are tributaries of the same river. All religions are equally valid and it is wrong to discriminate based only on religion.

"Marriage, contrary to what many romantic novels say, does not mean the total and absolute merging of two people to the extent that each loses his or her own identity. When a religion demands that both partners must have the same religious label, it denies the basic human right of an individual to believe what he or she wants. Societies throughout history have proved that "Unity in Diversity" is not only possible but desirable. Out of diversity comes greater respect and understanding. This should apply to marriage also. There are many living examples all over the world where the husband and wife maintain their own beliefs and yet are able to maintain their happy married life without confronting each other." - Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by SMEGGGY)
You willing to do that? What does your gf say? Does her family know she's seeing you?

Are you a,practicing Sikh? Do you read Gurbani

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Well I personally don't believe in converting to a religion just to marry someone. However I do believe in converting if you really believe in something.

Her family does not know yet. I am concerned about their reaction. I mean my family is fine with it so I am hoping hers is the same.

And I do practice a bit. I do read Gurbani sometimes, particularly the prayer before going to sleep. And I do carry on traditions like I do not drink alcohol or eat meat. However I do not observe the Kesh.
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nucdev
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(Original post by Peroxidation)
What your muslim friends don't understand is that all religions are tributaries of the same river. All religions are equally valid and it is wrong to discriminate based only on religion.

"Marriage, contrary to what many romantic novels say, does not mean the total and absolute merging of two people to the extent that each loses his or her own identity. When a religion demands that both partners must have the same religious label, it denies the basic human right of an individual to believe what he or she wants. Societies throughout history have proved that "Unity in Diversity" is not only possible but desirable. Out of diversity comes greater respect and understanding. This should apply to marriage also. There are many living examples all over the world where the husband and wife maintain their own beliefs and yet are able to maintain their happy married life without confronting each other." - Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda
:yep: sounds a lot like what Swami Vivekananda once said: "As different streams, having their sources in different places, all mingle their water in the sea, so, O Lord, the different paths which men take through different tendencies, various though they appear, crooked or straight, all lead to Thee"
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Anonymos01245
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You and your friends are obviosly not sikhs then
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Anonymos01245)
You and your friends are obviosly not sikhs then
And you created an account just to write that?
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Anonymous #3
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(Original post by Anonymous)
And you created an account just to write that?
My parents were in your situation, but reversed. I think the main issue is that its against both religions strictly speaking, but its up to you if you observe that. It depends how seriously you take your religion. A major reason for some objecting would be the matter of raising your children in a faith; obviously as a sikh or muslim. People say both but take it from someone whose experienced it, thats not possible. They contradict each other, so you cant really be two fully. In islam, you can marry people who follow the ibrahimic books, which are essentially books that teach the same concept: the Bible, the Torah and the Quran. Muslims can marry christians and jews too.
I guess in summary it depends on your views. If you're sure you wont conflict, it works. Is she very religious?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
My parents were in your situation, but reversed. I think the main issue is that its against both religions strictly speaking, but its up to you if you observe that. It depends how seriously you take your religion. A major reason for some objecting would be the matter of raising your children in a faith; obviously as a sikh or muslim. People say both but take it from someone whose experienced it, thats not possible. They contradict each other, so you cant really be two fully. In islam, you can marry people who follow the ibrahimic books, which are essentially books that teach the same concept: the Bible, the Torah and the Quran. Muslims can marry christians and jews too.
I guess in summary it depends on your views. If you're sure you wont conflict, it works. Is she very religious?
Actually it is disputable for the Sikh person. It isn't strictly mentioned in Sikhism, but I do know there are conflicts amongst people on what ceremony will be held. Most Sikhs I know say that they will marry anyone from any religion. However, there seems to be some Sikh families that don't want their children to marry Muslims, and I don't understand why they specify one religious group to not marry.

And I know in Islam it is only Muslim men that can marry Jews and Christians, and not Muslim women. So even if I became a Jew or Christian, it doesn't change the situation Islamically.

And I do take my religion seriously. I just don't see what the big issues are. As for the kids, I don't believe in teaching reliigon to children. I think that people should choose their religion as they wish.
Other than that, what other conflicts?
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samina_ay
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If your family and her family is fine with it. Then it does not matter of those people's opinions tbh.
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SMEGGGY
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Well I personally don't believe in converting to a religion just to marry someone. However I do believe in converting if you really believe in something.

Her family does not know yet. I am concerned about their reaction. I mean my family is fine with it so I am hoping hers is the same.

And I do practice a bit. I do read Gurbani sometimes, particularly the prayer before going to sleep. And I do carry on traditions like I do not drink alcohol or eat meat. However I do not observe the Kesh.
Then you should let her tell her parents, they'll not all be as accommodating as your parents.

Do you think if her parents are against she'll defy them or leave you for them? Think carefully. It's your choice and hers but take it all into consideration. Like you say if you believe in Islam the Shahdata is essential. This does not comply with Gurbani. Afterall there is one Khuda but denying Sikhi to appease for love is not ideal.

All the best :yes:

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SMEGGGY
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Actually it is disputable for the Sikh person. It isn't strictly mentioned in Sikhism, but I do know there are conflicts amongst people on what ceremony will be held. Most Sikhs I know say that they will marry anyone from any religion. However, there seems to be some Sikh families that don't want their children to marry Muslims, and I don't understand why they specify one religious group to not marry.

And I know in Islam it is only Muslim men that can marry Jews and Christians, and not Muslim women. So even if I became a Jew or Christian, it doesn't change the situation Islamically.

And I do take my religion seriously. I just don't see what the big issues are. As for the kids, I don't believe in teaching reliigon to children. I think that people should choose their religion as they wish.
Other than that, what other conflicts?
Well to not get into a Relgious war of words, the reason why it's such a huge deal is due to the Moguls and Sikhism. The Shaheedi of Dhan Guru Arjan Nirankar Ji by Shah Jahan, Jahangirs Shaheedi of Guru Tegh Bahadur Nirankar Ji. The Shaeedi of Baba Zorawar Singh & Baba Fateh Singh by Aurangzeb. Plus the eradication of Sikhism throughout India as it was a threat to Islam. Many other reasons but Guru Sahibs held no animosity towards Islam or Muslims or we'd have no Gurbani added by Sheikh Farid Ji, Bhagat Sadhana Ji, Sheikh Kabir Ji. Sain Mian Mir Ji layed foundations of The Darbar Sahib (Golden Temple)

Sian Bhuddan Shah, Peer Bhikan Ji etc etc.

http://www.sikhiwiki.org/index.php/P...Pots_of_Sweets


It can work, raise them in both religions, it matters not Allah is mentioned in SGGS too. Or most are raised atheists as not many are actual followers of the religion they are born in.

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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by SMEGGGY)
Then you should let her tell her parents, they'll not all be as accommodating as your parents.

Do you think if her parents are against she'll defy them or leave you for them? Think carefully. It's your choice and hers but take it all into consideration. Like you say if you believe in Islam the Shahdata is essential. This does not comply with Gurbani. Afterall there is one Khuda but denying Sikhi to appease for love is not ideal.

All the best :yes:

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I think we will first have to find out what her parents think of this before going further with thinking about if they are against.

Also I don't believe in Islam. I believe that there is truth within Islam. But my religion is Sikhism. Personally I take religion as a very personal thing, I would never impose anything on her. I also don't believe in leaving Sikhi just to be with someone. I do think people should leave the religion if they don't believe in it, as there is no point in forcing someone, and also everyone has their own choice of what religion to follow.
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neal95
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you better not do it in gurudwara unless you are both committed to sikhi. however I have nothing against interfaith marriage, just respect the tradition
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by neal95)
you better not do it in gurudwara unless you are both committed to sikhi. however I have nothing against interfaith marriage, just respect the tradition
And I don't plan to. Nor do I plan to do it an a Mosque. I think it's better to have a civil ceremony in a hall.
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Haydar1234
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(Original post by Peroxidation)
What your muslim friends don't understand is that all religions are tributaries of the same river. All religions are equally valid and it is wrong to discriminate based only on religion.

"Marriage, contrary to what many romantic novels say, does not mean the total and absolute merging of two people to the extent that each loses his or her own identity. When a religion demands that both partners must have the same religious label, it denies the basic human right of an individual to believe what he or she wants. Societies throughout history have proved that "Unity in Diversity" is not only possible but desirable. Out of diversity comes greater respect and understanding. This should apply to marriage also. There are many living examples all over the world where the husband and wife maintain their own beliefs and yet are able to maintain their happy married life without confronting each other." - Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda
Yeah, but them tributary rivers all have different patterns of meanders and dams that block the tributary from joining the main river.
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