AQA AS Politics - 5 Mark Question Challenge Watch

username1450924
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5 mark questions are easy way to pick up marks. I will start off by setting a 5 mark question, then someone answers it and sets another 5 mark question for someone to answer. This way we all get the benefits of good knowledge and style revision. I will do one of the 5 mark questions as well, when I see one that I like. I will put them all in a document and upload it to the forum if we get a large amount so they are all in one place.

So lets see if anyone will actually take part,

Explain the term Indirect Democracy [5 Marks]
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roselondon2
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This is a great idea! Although can no one judge me for my terrible politics knowledge. I'm hoping for a miracle over the next week during my revision!
Explain the term Indirect Democracy [5 Marks]
Indirect democracy is a system of political participation in which citizens elect other people (often called 'representatives' or 'delegates') to make and vote on political decisions for them. This is opposed to a direct democracy - for example in ancient Athens - when each eligible citizen voted directly on each law passed. However in countries with a large population, a direct democracy is not practical. The Representative Model of democracy (developed by Edmund Burke) allows citizens to elect a representative which then vote in the legislature body. In the UK, MP's serve this function and vote in the House of Commons on behalf of their constituents. However, there is an issue with MP's really serving their constituents - although technically they should vote according to their constituent's interests, they still have a degree of autonomy. Additionally they have to represent their parties view at the same time. Another method of indirect democracy is the Delegate model, used in the US, where representatives have no autonomy of their own.

Next question:
Explain the term Pluralism [5 Marks]
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BirdIsWord
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I'd rather do 10 markers I haven't learnt my 5 markers yet
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rebirth61213
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Explain the term Pluralism [5 Marks]

Pluralism refers to the existence of multiple groups and institutions that support differing viewpoints on a particular subject; in a pluralistic society, none of these opposing views can override the other (i.e. groups with competing interests should be roughly equal in terms of the resources they have). Pluralism is seen as the opposite of the elitist model which theorises that political power is wielded by groups that are better educated, wealthier etc. The elitist model is a better description of British society as it is apparent that some groups/institutions have an advantage over their opposing group(s). For example, the Confederacy of British Industry (CBI) campaigns for less regulation on British businesses whilst the Trade Union Congress (TUC), which is an umbrella group that represents British Trade Unions, is against the CBI's aim. However, the CBI is likely to more wealthy than the TUC, putting the latter group at a disadvantage. Furthermore, the CBI's goals are supported by powerful institutions overseas, such as multinational corporations, putting the TUC at even more of a disadvantage.

[Not sure if this makes complete sense; I tried to do this is under 5 mins].

Next question (hope you don't mind some Unit 2): Explain the term select committees [5].
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roselondon2
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(Original post by BirdIsWord)
I'd rather do 10 markers I haven't learnt my 5 markers yet
Okay, how about - Describe and explain two disadvantages of the UK's two party system?
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BirdIsWord
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(Original post by roselondon2)
Okay, how about - Describe and explain two disadvantages of the UK's two party system?
I'm doing Voting Behaviour/participation and pressure group.
No political parties or electoral systems
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rebirth61213
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(Original post by roselondon2)
Okay, how about - Describe and explain two disadvantages of the UK's two party system?
I'll give it a go (although I would prefer it if we could continue w/ 5 markers as 10 markers require references to the extract).

One disadvantage of the UK's two party system, partly established by the operation of first-past-the-post (FPTP), is that the system fosters apathy towards politics as those who support the views of minor parties (for example, the Green Party, UKIP etc.) are forced to tactically vote either for the Conservatives or Labour (which ever they dislike the least) in order to ensure their vote is not wasted. This is a possible reason for the low turnout that has characterised recent elections (e.g. turnout reached its lowest in 2001 at 59% due to the wearing off of the excitement over 'New Labour' and the realisation of the ideological convergence of the two main parties).

Another disadvantage is the fact that a two party system engenders adversarial politics, which explains the petty partisan point scoring in Prime Minister's Questions. This is bad because having an adversarial set up detracts from serious debate about policies as the opposition's main focus is to make the government look unelectable rather than fine tune their policies.

[Really unsure about the second point; I tried to do this off the top of my head in 10 mins]
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govtandpolitics
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Next question (hope you don't mind some Unit 2): Explain the term select committees [5]. [/QUOTE]

A select committee is a small legislative committee appointed in order to scrutinise or examine specific issues which are decided by the committee. Select committees have wide powers to summon witnesses, examine restricted document, question ministers, officials and outside experts. Select committees have proven effective at scrutinising the actions of the executive and holding it to account. Departmental select committees were created in 1979 to scrutinise the policy, administration and expenditure of government departments and in 2013, there was 19 departmental select committees. Currently, membership of select committees is fixed at 11 backbench MPs and reflects the party balance in the Commons.

(That was a hard one!)

Next Question:
Explain the term mandate (5m).
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rebirth61213
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(Original post by govtandpolitics)

(That was a hard one!)
I know; I deliberately chose an obscure one from a previous past paper. You got all the detail there, but you could fluff it up more by stating an example of a select committee hearing evidence from high profile witnesses (e.g. the Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee's investigation into the phone-hacking scandal, which involved hearing evidence from Rupert and James Murdoch; this interrogative investigation helped to fine-tune gov't policies on media regulation). Examples like these saves you from having to remember stats and dates (which, imo, are harder to remember). But it's of course down to preference and I'm sure you'll get the 5 marks.

(Original post by govtandpolitics)
Next Question:
Explain the term mandate (5m).
A mandate usually refers to the authority conferred on a political party following an election victory; the winning party following an election victory can claim that they have a mandate for their policies to be implemented, meaning that they have the right to implement their manifesto pledges and that there should be minimum interference in order for the government to respond to the public's will (hence the need for the Salsbury Convention which prevents the House of Lords from temporarily blocking a manifesto pledge). However, scrutiny of a government's manifesto pledges still needs to occur as the success of some governments following an election may be chiefly due to first-past-the-post producing a biased result, leading to the government having a questionable mandate (e.g. Labour's staggering 179 working majority with less than 50% of the popular vote in 1997).

(May have waffled a bit w/ this one; again I tried to do this off the top of my head and in under 5 mins!)

Next question: Explain the term judicial review [5]
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govtandpolitics
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(Original post by rebirth61213)
I know; I deliberately chose an obscure one from a previous past paper. You got all the detail there, but you could fluff it up more by stating an example of a select committee hearing evidence from high profile witnesses (e.g. the Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee's investigation into the phone-hacking scandal, which involved hearing evidence from Rupert and James Murdoch; this interrogative investigation helped to fine-tune gov't policies on media regulation). Examples like these saves you from having to remember stats and dates (which, imo, are harder to remember). But it's of course down to preference and I'm sure you'll get the 5 marks.



A mandate usually refers to the authority conferred on a political party following an election victory; the winning party following an election victory can claim that they have a mandate for their policies to be implemented, meaning that they have the right to implement their manifesto pledges and that there should be minimum interference in order for the government to respond to the public's will (hence the need for the Salsbury Convention which prevents the House of Lords from temporarily blocking a manifesto pledge). However, scrutiny of a government's manifesto pledges still needs to occur as the success of some governments following an election may be chiefly due to first-past-the-post producing a biased result, leading to the government having a questionable mandate (e.g. Labour's staggering 179 working majority with less than 50% of the popular vote in 1997).

(May have waffled a bit w/ this one; again I tried to do this off the top of my head and in under 5 mins!)

Next question: Explain the term judicial review [5]
Nice answer!

Judicial review is the process by which senior judges use their power to review the actions of government and public authorities, in order to determine whether or not they have acted in a manner that is lawful or whether they have acted ultra vires. The doctrine of parliamentary sovereignty and supremacy of statute law means that judicial review in the UK is generally seen as being less significant than in the USA, where the US Supreme Court can strike down pieces of regular statute that are judged to have violated the provisions of the US constitution. The passing of the Human Rights Act 1998 and the power given to UK courts in respect of EU legislation since that takes precedence, has seen a change in the nature and scope of judicial review in the UK.

Next Question:
Explain the term "policy communities" (5m).
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rebirth61213
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(Original post by govtandpolitics)
Next Question:
Explain the term "policy communities" (5m).
Ooh. Thanks for asking this one; most of my class struggled to define this (including myself), so it's imperative that everyone here is clear on this term, judging by the confusion that occurred in my set. I'll give it my best... (there's nothing in my textbook and there are very few accessible definitions on the web, but I have discussed this term w/ my teacher, so here goes...)

Policy communities are one of the two main types of policy network, which is defined as a collaborative group of governmental officials and non-governmental actors with shared interests working together to formulate policy in a particular field. The other type of policy network are issue networks. Policy communities tend to be less inclusive than issue networks as the former tends to only include ministers and leaders of influential insider pressure groups whilst the latter (issue networks) tend to contain a broader range of specialists (e.g. academics, periphery insider groups and potentially outsider groups provided that they are not outsiders by necessity or ideological outsiders). Due to increased media scrutiny (i.e. an increase in the demand for transparency) and the rise of social media which enhances communications between large groups of differing stakeholders, policy communities have been displaced by their more inclusive and informal counterparts; an example of part of an issue network is the National Farmer's Union and the Royal Society for the Protection of Bird's warnings to the government about the potential damage to the environment caused by the construction of HS2. Their contributions - alongside contributions from economists, pro-HS2 pressure groups etc. - will aid the government in implementing the project at the lowest social cost.

[I think I rambled a bit with this one, but I'm trying to make sure everyone here is clear with this term].

Next question: Explain the term 'patronage' as used in the extract*** (in the context of the the House of Lords).***

***I put at the end "as used in the extract" and the bit in brackets because apparently someone last year got 2 marks for describing the use of patronage in the Commons (when the extract was solely on the Lords). I'm pointing this out b/c some of my friends - including myself until a few weeks ago - didn't know this (i.e. that the the answer needs to be in the right context; I always assumed that you can just ignore the extract for the 5 marker). So, don't fall this trap on Monday/Thursday!
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govtandpolitics
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Next question: Explain the term 'patronage' as used in the extract*** (in the context of the the House of Lords).***

***I put at the end "as used in the extract" and the bit in brackets because apparently someone last year got 2 marks for describing the use of patronage in the Commons (when the extract was solely on the Lords). I'm pointing this out b/c some of my friends - including myself until a few weeks ago - didn't know this (i.e. that the the answer needs to be in the right context; I always assumed that you can just ignore the extract for the 5 marker). So, don't fall this trap![/QUOTE]

Explain the term 'patronage'.

Patronage is the power to appoint someone to an important position and the Prime Minister now has patronage powers which were traditionally the monarchs. The most significant patronage power the PM has is the power to appoint government ministers. The PM also has other patronage powers such as his role in appointing senior members of the Church of England, although this was reduced under Brown. The Life Peerages Act 1958 gave the PM the right to appoint members of the House of Lords for life and this is an important patronage power, and Tony Benn, the Energy Secretary prior to 1979 General Election stated that he wanted to introduce a policy for the abolition of the House of Lords, because he believed patronage to be an abuse of power.

(I did include other info on patronage not in the context of the HOL, but I made sure I did mention patronage in the HOL)

Next Question:
Explain the term Special Adviser (5m).
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Cal1999
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Hi all,

If you could, please would you be able to help me?

Any top tips on how to score relatively high on this paper?

Anything which is always good to include in 5 markers, 10 markers, 25 markers?

For unit 1, I have studied:Pressure groupsElectoral systems Participation & Voting behaviour

For these topics, is there any key terms, or any sub-topics that I must be 100% be confident on?

Finally, does anybody have any predictions for this paper?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

I have had 2 mocks at college in exams conditions, and both times I have received an A - I just feel like I have been very lucky with the questions though.

Exam tips which could ultimately boost by mark would be great!

Thank you for your help,Kind Regards.
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govtandpolitics
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(Original post by Cal1999)
Hi all,

If you could, please would you be able to help me?

Any top tips on how to score relatively high on this paper?

Anything which is always good to include in 5 markers, 10 markers, 25 markers?

For unit 1, I have studied:Pressure groupsElectoral systems Participation & Voting behaviour

For these topics, is there any key terms, or any sub-topics that I must be 100% be confident on?

Finally, does anybody have any predictions for this paper?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

I have had 2 mocks at college in exams conditions, and both times I have received an A - I just feel like I have been very lucky with the questions though.

Exam tips which could ultimately boost by mark would be great!

Thank you for your help,Kind Regards.
Any top tips on how to score relatively high on this paper?You need to include lots and lots and lots of examples, and quotes from people, and specific points that get straight to your arguments. Back every point up with evidence so that the examiner knows that you know your stuff.
Anything which is always good to include in 5 markers, 10 markers, 25 markers?In the 5m and 10m always refer to the extract and dont waffle on as you havent got the time and need to get straight to your point with examples. In your 25m you need to analysis more and make sure you are explaining WHY it is what you said and back this up with examples again. Its all about the examples!
For unit 1, I have studied:Pressure groupsElectoral systems Participation & Voting behaviourFor these topics, is there any key terms, or any sub-topics that I must be 100% be confident on?
http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...50-W-SP-14.PDF
thats the specification and you need to know everything on your topic, as anything from there could come up.
Finally, does anybody have any predictions for this paper?I really dont know any predictions :/ apparently it could have something to do with the 2015 general election but I don't know :/
Any help would be greatly appreciated.I have had 2 mocks at college in exams conditions, and both times I have received an A - I just feel like I have been very lucky with the questions though.Exam tips which could ultimately boost by mark would be great!If you are managing A's now then I wouldnt worry. Just make sure that you are including examples as this really shows your understanding and you need to be direct with your points as waffling can come across as you dont know what you are talking about. If you are really struggling with a question, just make an educated answer and try to use the source for guidance!I am so not ready for this exam but hey ho! xD
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yellowgiraffe28
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Explain the term special advisor (5m)

A special advisor is an unelected member of a ministers team who advises them. Special advisors are civil servants who are not bound to civil service principles - for example they often serve fixed-term contracts in contrast to the permenant contracts of other civil servants. Special advisors are a key feature of 'kitchen cabinet' governments, such as Tony Blair's 1997-2005 government where he relied on his team of special advisors. However, special advisors are often linked with scandals when a minister/PM relies on them too much - for example Alistair Campbell, a special advisor to Tony Blair, was involved in the 'dodgey dossier' resulting in Blair sending troops into Iraq under the misinformation of them having 'weapons of mass destruction'.

Next question: explain the term European Council (5m)

Okay I'm in year 11 and doing AS politics alongside my GCSEs and I'm really freaking out about the exam - there just seems to be so much content and I don't know how to revise for it - does anyone have any tips? I've tried making flashcards and rewriting notes but it's not really working. :/
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Cal1999
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How could I use this term

embourgeoisement


In an exam?

Voting behaviour? Any other topics? What sort of answers? How would you put it into an answer?


What if it was a 5 marker - how would you define it?
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govtandpolitics
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(Original post by Cal1999)
How could I use this term

embourgeoisement


In an exam?

Voting behaviour? Any other topics? What sort of answers? How would you put it into an answer?


What if it was a 5 marker - how would you define it?
You could include it in voting behaviour as post war, working class would normally vote Labour but since labour became new labour the "old" working class became the "new" working class and this led to embourgeoisement which is the transfer of working class citizens to middle class
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connormc199
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Explain the term 'mass media'
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Sademajek
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(Original post by connormc199)
Explain the term 'mass media'
Mass media is a catch phrase that portrays all kinds of media coverage ranging from television and newspapers to the internet as demonstrated in the extract. It plays a huge part in general elections sit reaches masses and almost impossible to get away from as 60% of people read the morning paper a day and 97% of homes own a tv.There has been a rise of new social media and internet usage in 2012 it was estimated 80% had access to the internet, which shows that mass media is also very influential.


Ive got two1) explain the term by election
2) explain the term coalition government
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unsa98
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could someone come up with a definition for legitimacy (don't know what to write about this term)?
thanks
it would be very much appreciated
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