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    I've been looking at the unseen section of the English Literature exam and I'm still struggling with it a little, especially the prose option for the unseen section. I know about looking for structure,form and language but I'm not sure about exactly what I looking for, if you know what I mean. I know I could choose the poetry but I want to have the option to do the prose if I don't like the poem.
    I know about effect of narrative perspective, tone/atmosphere/mood, use of techniques like direct speech, characterisation, themes and imagery, language choice, sentence structure, structure of the piece (what happens in it) and other techniques like metaphors and things. I'm not sure if you have to discuss context in this part- I'm not sure how you would if little detail was given about it. Are there any specific things I should look for and comment on that I haven't mentioned? I can't seem to get much more than a high B on the practices of this we've done in class.
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    Hi. I'm also doing A2 English Literature this friday. I too am struggling with the unseen section of the past papers. I tend to get low As in the prose questions so maybe I can help you! Everything you've mentioned is good when analysing prose. I recently asked my ENglish Literature teacher about whether talking about context is important and she said that usually unnecessary as you are only getting a small extract from the novel..so it's difficult to say much on the background. My advice is to only mention context if it is obvious to you. For example there is one unseen prose text that is a dialogue between two nurses in a mental health hospital. The novel was written in the 1930s (you are told this in the question). In the dialogue one of the nurses calls the patients "insane" which wouldn't happen today as we have a better understanding of people with psychological problems. We wouldn't simply call them "insane". Therefore when doing this question I mentioned how her use of terminology reflects the attitude at the time (inthe that1930s) towards people with mental health problems. I was only able to mention backgroud/historical context as it was rather obvious and the lack of understanding of mental issues common in the 20th century. Most of the time it is impossible or very difficult to talk about historical context. Plus, the question is only looking at A01 and A02 so focus primarily on language, form and structure. Mention context only if it is clear to you in the text and by the date it was written. Other than that you seem to be covered. Maybe look at whether you can sympathise with the narrator or characters... Just keep practing anf you'll do fine. Hope this helps!
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    Hello,
    May i ask a quick question? How would you write about form in the unseen prose? Other than narrative, 1st/3rd person I'm not sure what to say.
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    Hi again. I saw your question and I quickly asked my English Literature teacher. She said avoid using the term 'form' when talking about prose. Focus on structure: order of words in a sentence (syntax), types of sentence structures ( simple, compound, complex, interrogative sentence, exclamatory sentence, declarative sentence, telegraphic sentence etc), line lengths (are the line lengths in each paragraph the same length? If not, what is the effect?) and number of lines per paragraph (are the number of lines per paragraph the same? If not, what is the effect?)

    In prose you can also look at narrative perspective (1st/2nd/3rd person pronouns), tense, diction/vocab, imagery, sound devices, tone and mood, punctuation, dialogue, characterisation (do you learn about characters through direct presentation or indirect presentation?)

    So just avoid the term 'form' and focus on structure and language. If you include everything else, you can still achieve a very high mark. Hope this helps!
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    (Original post by tesa)
    Hi again. I saw your question and I quickly asked my English Literature teacher. She said avoid using the term 'form' when talking about prose. Focus on structure: order of words in a sentence (syntax), types of sentence structures ( simple, compound, complex, interrogative sentence, exclamatory sentence, declarative sentence, telegraphic sentence etc), line lengths (are the line lengths in each paragraph the same length? If not, what is the effect?) and number of lines per paragraph (are the number of lines per paragraph the same? If not, what is the effect?)

    In prose you can also look at narrative perspective (1st/2nd/3rd person pronouns), tense, diction/vocab, imagery, sound devices, tone and mood, punctuation, dialogue, characterisation (do you learn about characters through direct presentation or indirect presentation?)

    So just avoid the term 'form' and focus on structure and language. If you include everything else, you can still achieve a very high mark. Hope this helps!
    Thanks, I'll bear that in mind.
 
 
 
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