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Is it possible to learn the first unit of AS chemistry in a weeks half term? Watch

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    Hi. I currently do the OCR A chemistry new specification for 2016 and my school did not enter us for the AS exam ad it is fully linear,
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    This means my class have to do mock exams to give us our predicted grades

    I was wondering if it is possible to learn the first 7 chapters of AS chemistry during this weeks half term. I want to start from scratch. The exam which goes towards our predicted grades for university is on the first day back.
    I want to know if its possible to do this, how much work I would need to put in and which resources I can use.

    I really want an A so that I can get a good AS/ predicted grade.

    Thanks
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    (Original post by emanlk)
    Hi. I currently do the OCR A chemistry new specification for 2016 and my school did not enter us for the AS exam ad it is fully linear,
    .
    This means my class have to do mock exams to give us our predicted grades

    I was wondering if it is possible to learn the first 7 chapters of AS chemistry during this weeks half term. I want to start from scratch. The exam which goes towards our predicted grades for university is on the first day back.
    I want to know if its possible to do this, how much work I would need to put in and which resources I can use.

    I really want an A so that I can get a good AS/ predicted grade.

    Thanks
    It is possible, more so if this is your only exam, since this is the new specification I won't lie and say past papers will pull you through because they probably will not. practice and specimen papers might pull you through quite a bit I estimate you have 6 hours worth of them (I hope, they are useful) I would do these midway around your break (after you have done 7 chapters). But really while its possible you must also look at it realistically, 7 chapters how long does it actually take you to read 7 chapters and what would you have to do to commit it to memory, how much do you need things like that. If you have a specific method to memorize say method of loci or something and you are up to memorize your first 7 chapters and attempt that, then that's fine and should spare you enough time. Do note I said memorize but I'm assuming you will understand it by that. An A is so variable, since new specifications test understanding far more than previously.Specification; know inside out everything you need to be able to answer every point and know every stated fact on that (DO NOT FORGET PRACTICALS ARE IMPORTANT)Book if you have a book on the first 7 chapters do all the end of chapter questions and read through to see if you feel any gaps in understanding or knowledgeits important to not think I will memorize this, but rather I will understand this,assuming you can *then memorize your understanding*; do practice papers. If you are able to get over 90% on a practice paper your A is looking better, if not (which is what usually happens since the answers are so specific) keep in mind to answer specifically as the exam paper does, for example on shape questions they have a general format N areas of electron density , causes these areas to repel as far away as possible from each other forming the shape X with M degrees, you can easily copy this format and use it for your answer.while often people say not to revise things you know already as it could be wasting time and that you should specifically pick things you don't know so well, I also advise that after this you should pick things you do badly/slowly, say it was mole calculations you take 7 minutes to do a 4 mark one (but you do it correctly) I advise increasing speed even if it is 4 minutes for 4 marks as that will take pressure off you in the exam (being done early and able to check or spend time on more difficult questions that seemed to take extra time).Resources what I find helpful regardless of exam board:http://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/chemistry-revision/ has questions and in depth theory sheets which are helpful.http://www.knockhardy.org.uk/sci.htm <very good last minute saviour and "looks clean and easier to memorize"My Chemistry this year has been done without a textbook because mine seemed to argue with mark schemes, and has errors If yours does not , its your #1 go to.
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    (Original post by jtru)
    It is possible, more so if this is your only exam, since this is the new specification I won't lie and say past papers will pull you through because they probably will not. practice and specimen papers might pull you through quite a bit I estimate you have 6 hours worth of them (I hope, they are useful) I would do these midway around your break (after you have done 7 chapters). But really while its possible you must also look at it realistically, 7 chapters how long does it actually take you to read 7 chapters and what would you have to do to commit it to memory, how much do you need things like that. If you have a specific method to memorize say method of loci or something and you are up to memorize your first 7 chapters and attempt that, then that's fine and should spare you enough time. Do note I said memorize but I'm assuming you will understand it by that. An A is so variable, since new specifications test understanding far more than previously.Specification; know inside out everything you need to be able to answer every point and know every stated fact on that (DO NOT FORGET PRACTICALS ARE IMPORTANT)Book if you have a book on the first 7 chapters do all the end of chapter questions and read through to see if you feel any gaps in understanding or knowledgeits important to not think I will memorize this, but rather I will understand this,assuming you can *then memorize your understanding*; do practice papers. If you are able to get over 90% on a practice paper your A is looking better, if not (which is what usually happens since the answers are so specific) keep in mind to answer specifically as the exam paper does, for example on shape questions they have a general format N areas of electron density , causes these areas to repel as far away as possible from each other forming the shape X with M degrees, you can easily copy this format and use it for your answer.while often people say not to revise things you know already as it could be wasting time and that you should specifically pick things you don't know so well, I also advise that after this you should pick things you do badly/slowly, say it was mole calculations you take 7 minutes to do a 4 mark one (but you do it correctly) I advise increasing speed even if it is 4 minutes for 4 marks as that will take pressure off you in the exam (being done early and able to check or spend time on more difficult questions that seemed to take extra time).Resources what I find helpful regardless of exam board:http://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/chemistry-revision/ has questions and in depth theory sheets which are helpful.http://www.knockhardy.org.uk/sci.htm <very good last minute saviour and "looks clean and easier to memorize"My Chemistry this year has been done without a textbook because mine seemed to argue with mark schemes, and has errors If yours does not , its your #1 go to.
    Thanks a lot
 
 
 
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