Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    Hi,

    I am soon to begin investing, which will be with a 10 year goal in mind of increasing value. I will start with £100 a month and as my career progresses I hope to increase this.

    I was wondering what people's though are on good shares to buy.

    I was thinking:
    -Google (huge gains already made but I see this continuing)
    -Amazon (as before, I think online shopping will increase, and they dominate the market)
    -Nuclear Power, I think this will be the future of energy. I was thinking EDF but perhaps a less well-known provider would be better. I have no expertise here.
    -Robotics. This I believe is a huge area for growth but I do not know who to invest in.
    -ASOS. Big gains made already but have dipped somewhat. I think ASOS will do really well over the next few years as they are the best online fashion retailer (also a third of my uni's post seems to come from ASOS)

    I also discovered Marlborough UK Micro Cap Growth which invests in smaller UK companies (less than £250m) which is of course riskier but they have a decent track record, and have a very diverse portfolio. I believe the UK economy has a strong future and now may be a good time to buy due to brexit uncertainty.

    What do you think? Would these make a decent portfoilio for growth over 10 years? Ant particular robotics or nuclear companies that could be a good choice?

    Thanks
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by number23)
    Hi,

    I am soon to begin investing, which will be with a 10 year goal in mind of increasing value. I will start with £100 a month and as my career progresses I hope to increase this.

    I was wondering what people's though are on good shares to buy.

    I was thinking:
    -Google (huge gains already made but I see this continuing)
    -Amazon (as before, I think online shopping will increase, and they dominate the market)
    -Nuclear Power, I think this will be the future of energy. I was thinking EDF but perhaps a less well-known provider would be better. I have no expertise here.
    -Robotics. This I believe is a huge area for growth but I do not know who to invest in.
    -ASOS. Big gains made already but have dipped somewhat. I think ASOS will do really well over the next few years as they are the best online fashion retailer (also a third of my uni's post seems to come from ASOS)

    I also discovered Marlborough UK Micro Cap Growth which invests in smaller UK companies (less than £250m) which is of course riskier but they have a decent track record, and have a very diverse portfolio. I believe the UK economy has a strong future and now may be a good time to buy due to brexit uncertainty.

    What do you think? Would these make a decent portfoilio for growth over 10 years? Ant particular robotics or nuclear companies that could be a good choice?

    Thanks
    at the moment oil could be worth a bet as it sitting so low and will grow soon
    another risky way is to directly investing start up and small businesses some will return the cash with a large percentage (10-50% returns in a year) or with equity that can potentially grow exponentially
    Spoiler:
    Show
    one of my uncles knew a high end 2nd hand car dealership which got an investor in a decade long contract in the 1999 so the investor put in about £500,000 and was promised 5% return per year for a 55% stake so for 8 years it was all good the investor got his £25,000 then the recession hit and more cars came into the dealership than left so the investor was legally allowed to take over as majority shareholder he took 5 cars (a 1998 porshe 911, a 2006 rolls royce ghost, a 2004 bentley mulsanne, a 2005 ferrari 360 and a 2003 range rover vogue worth in total about £300,000) and sold my uncle the remains of the company including the property and 15 other cars including a ferrari f355 and 3 aston martins and assorted bmw, audi and mercedes for £150,000(remortgaged the house and annoyed my aunt to no end) and made more from selling off the 11 cars he didn't keep get £50,000 for the aston martin vantage and selling the rest for £15,000 each (most were worth about 25-30k but he wanted the space clear)
    he still has the ferrari and one of the astons (he kept two but sold to broker another deal) as well as an s-class V12 AMG mercedes
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jamesthehustler)
    at the moment oil could be worth a bet as it sitting so low and will grow soon
    another risky way is to directly investing start up and small businesses some will return the cash with a large percentage (10-50% returns in a year) or with equity that can potentially grow exponentially
    Spoiler:
    Show
    one of my uncles knew a high end 2nd hand car dealership which got an investor in a decade long contract in the 1999 so the investor put in about £500,000 and was promised 5% return per year for a 55% stake so for 8 years it was all good the investor got his £25,000 then the recession hit and more cars came into the dealership than left so the investor was legally allowed to take over as majority shareholder he took 5 cars (a 1998 porshe 911, a 2006 rolls royce ghost, a 2004 bentley mulsanne, a 2005 ferrari 360 and a 2003 range rover vogue worth in total about £300,000) and sold my uncle the remains of the company including the property and 15 other cars including a ferrari f355 and 3 aston martins and assorted bmw, audi and mercedes for £150,000(remortgaged the house and annoyed my aunt to no end) and made more from selling off the 11 cars he didn't keep get £50,000 for the aston martin vantage and selling the rest for £15,000 each (most were worth about 25-30k but he wanted the space clear)
    he still has the ferrari and one of the astons (he kept two but sold to broker another deal) as well as an s-class V12 AMG mercedes
    OK thanks. I agree oil is good to buy. Obviously it will run out in the medium/long term, but probably a good investment for a year or so.

    What would be a good share to invest in to make the most of the low oil price?

    I saw this article http://www.investopedia.com/articles...l-rebounds.asp

    Shall I just pick one of them?

    I am thinking of also going for natural/organic food and nuclear energy sectors... going by what I believe are growing industries
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by number23)
    Hi,

    I am soon to begin investing, which will be with a 10 year goal in mind of increasing value. I will start with £100 a month and as my career progresses I hope to increase this.

    I was wondering what people's though are on good shares to buy.

    I was thinking:
    -Google (huge gains already made but I see this continuing)
    -Amazon (as before, I think online shopping will increase, and they dominate the market)
    -Nuclear Power, I think this will be the future of energy. I was thinking EDF but perhaps a less well-known provider would be better. I have no expertise here.
    -Robotics. This I believe is a huge area for growth but I do not know who to invest in.
    -ASOS. Big gains made already but have dipped somewhat. I think ASOS will do really well over the next few years as they are the best online fashion retailer (also a third of my uni's post seems to come from ASOS)

    I also discovered Marlborough UK Micro Cap Growth which invests in smaller UK companies (less than £250m) which is of course riskier but they have a decent track record, and have a very diverse portfolio. I believe the UK economy has a strong future and now may be a good time to buy due to brexit uncertainty.

    What do you think? Would these make a decent portfoilio for growth over 10 years? Ant particular robotics or nuclear companies that could be a good choice?

    Thanks
    I would check if holding foreign shares (Google/Amazon) will have costs.

    Whilst i think neither pays dividends( some brokers have fees for foreign dividends) given very small initial holdings buying shares directly in either might have cost issues in proportion to the holdings, thus impairing performance.

    Given initially very limited funds you might consider collective investments initially (not all eggs in one basket) and purchase more individual stocks when your portfolio has a bit more critical mass.

    At least with regular investment (and you want to work out an efficient minimum purchase size) pound cost averaging should temper initial risks.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DJKL)
    I would check if holding foreign shares (Google/Amazon) will have costs.

    Whilst i think neither pays dividends( some brokers have fees for foreign dividends) given very small initial holdings buying shares directly in either might have cost issues in proportion to the holdings, thus impairing performance.

    Given initially very limited funds you might consider collective investments initially (not all eggs in one basket) and purchase more individual stocks when your portfolio has a bit more critical mass.

    At least with regular investment (and you want to work out an efficient minimum purchase size) pound cost averaging should temper initial risks.
    Yes it will only be £100 a week, but this will be long term, so after 10 years I will have put in £12, 000. I want to start early due to compound interest, and I have a genuine interest in the stock market.

    Would a better plan be to select around 5 UK-based stocks in emerging markets (nuclear, organic food, robotics...) that have had a decent track record?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by number23)
    OK thanks. I agree oil is good to buy. Obviously it will run out in the medium/long term, but probably a good investment for a year or so.

    What would be a good share to invest in to make the most of the low oil price?

    I saw this article http://www.investopedia.com/articles...l-rebounds.asp

    Shall I just pick one of them?

    I am thinking of also going for natural/organic food and nuclear energy sectors... going by what I believe are growing industries
    i'd agree as you looking for long term investments
    also look into what warren buffett says most of his cash was made from investing and he's the 3rd richest guy on the planet
    he's said that he would never consider tobacco or alcohol company's long term for a start
    Spoiler:
    Show
    i have a small-ish portfolio that me and my best friend matched each other on
    we both have a £1000 each in BP, BT, IHG and MAB that he bought 4 years ago and i bought 3 years ago (£4,000 in total each)
    and a thousand in gold bullion and a thousand in silver bullion (£4,000 in total)
    i bought my gold six years ago and my silver last year, he bought both 3 years ago
    so i have
    bp- 205 [email protected]£4.87
    bt- 273 [email protected]£3.65
    mab- 241 [email protected]£4.14
    ihg- 53 [email protected]£18.87
    gold- 55 grams (a 50g bar and a 5g bar)
    silver- 105 ounces (a 100oz bar and a 5oz bar)
    and he has
    bp- 222 [email protected]£4.50
    bt- 469 [email protected]£2.13
    mab- 296 [email protected]£3.37
    ihg- 65 [email protected]£15.25
    gold- 41 grams (a 1t.oz bar and a 10g bar)
    silver- 2.5 kilos (a pair of kilogram bars and a half kilo bar)
    • TSR Support Team
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Alphabet and Amazon's share price exceeds your monthly investment so I doubt you'll be able to get direct exposure to them.

    Having so many stocks will likely mean that the share-dealing fees will be a significant drag on your investment (i.e. just the act of buying and selling shares increases the necessary break-even return significantly).

    Be wary of basing an investment decision on how the shares have performed recently as past performance is no guarantee of future returns and too many people buy into a stock at their highs (the euphoria stage) when the hype is greatest.

    There's also significant concentration in just a handful of investments so the performance of one company could make or break your returns. It's much better risk-management wise to diversify and invest in a bunch of modest but consistent winners (perhaps through an ETF that tracks a market which generally does ok/well) than it is to rely on everything going well (it rarely does).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The Financier)
    Alphabet and Amazon's share price exceeds your monthly investment so I doubt you'll be able to get direct exposure to them.

    Having so many stocks will likely mean that the share-dealing fees will be a significant drag on your investment (i.e. just the act of buying and selling shares increases the necessary break-even return significantly).

    Be wary of basing an investment decision on how the shares have performed recently as past performance is no guarantee of future returns and too many people buy into a stock at their highs (the euphoria stage) when the hype is greatest.

    There's also significant concentration in just a handful of investments so the performance of one company could make or break your returns. It's much better risk-management wise to diversify and invest in a bunch of modest but consistent winners (perhaps through an ETF that tracks a market which generally does ok/well) than it is to rely on everything going well (it rarely does).
    ok thanks

    so I need less stocks to override costs but enough to have a diverse portfolio.. given that it probably is best as you say to use a tracker. Would you recommend doing this with say Hargreaves Lansdown, or setting up a stocks and shares ISA with Lloyds, Virgin.. which have ready made tracker portfolios. Although I have heard the fees are high for these.

    I am not just looking at past performanance, but also if there is a future demand for the industry

    I think there are huge gains in say the robotics industry for the long term investment.

    Would opening up an account with Hargreaves Lansdown and investing £100 a month into one company which has good potential and has positive recommendations upon doing research be a good first move? In a few months, when I have more to spare I can invest more money and select another stock after careful research.

    The stock I am thinking of is Intuitive Surgical, one of the leading companies for robotic surgery, and I have read many articles recommending this stock. I think it has potential for growth..

    My idea is to keep all stocks for at least 5 years, and every few months adding a new stock to my portfolio.

    Could I do much better than this in my situation?
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
    Useful resources
    How much money do you spend a week?The ultimate guide to tax!Guide to student bank accounts

    Sponsored features:

    Web Legend

    Win a Macbook Air!

    Blog about setting up a website for a chance to win in our Web Legend competition.

    Quick link:

    Unanswered money and finance threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.