Is anyone going to vote for Labour in 2020

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Bob's Your Uncle
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#1
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#1
I am going to vote for labour in 2020. I like John McDonnell
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sainsburys wraps
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#2
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if its george osbourne, boris johnson or michael gove leading the tories then hell yes
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Bob's Your Uncle
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#3
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(Original post by sainsburys wraps)
if its george osbourne, boris johnson or michael gove leading the tories then hell yes
That means you are going to vote for Labour. Good lad.
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The gains kinggg
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never.
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Fractite
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Yeah maybe.
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Bob's Your Uncle
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(Original post by The gains kinggg)
never.
What about old labour, where they wanted to reduce immigration and leave the EU
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BirdIsWord
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Conservatives or go home.
I wish I was American so I could vote Trump.
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Bob's Your Uncle
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(Original post by BirdIsWord)
Conservatives or go home.
I wish I was American so I could vote Trump.
I'm on the opposite side. However, I think we would agree that we should leave the EU
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viddy9
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#9
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Yes, I will be.

Labour have a far superior economic strategy, shaped by some of the world's top economists and backed by the OECD and the IMF, who have called for more investment in the economy to spur growth, at a time when interest rates are at a record low. Both the OECD and the IMF have admitted that austerity is bad for the economy.

On top of that, I agree with Labour on immigration, supporting workers' co-operatives and taking our railways back into public ownership. If, as has been suggested, McDonnell and Corbyn will propose a Land Value Tax (universally supported by economists on the left and the right, from Adam Smith onwards), then that would strengthen my support for them even further. I'm also glad that they're not wanting to raise corporation and income tax too much, and are instead focusing on tackling tax avoidance and evasion.

More controversially, I disagree with them on scrapping tuition fees, to pick out the most prominent area of disagreement. However, in terms of policies, I'm far closer to Labour at this moment in time than to any other party.
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Bob's Your Uncle
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(Original post by viddy9)
Yes, I will be.

Labour have a far superior economic strategy, shaped by some of the world's top economists and backed by the OECD and the IMF, who have called for more investment in the economy to spur growth, at a time when interest rates are at a record low. Both the OECD and the IMF have admitted that austerity is bad for the economy.

On top of that, I agree with Labour on immigration, supporting workers' co-operatives and taking our railways back into public ownership. If, as has been suggested, McDonnell and Corbyn will propose a Land Value Tax (universally supported by economists on the left and the right, from Adam Smith onwards), then that would strengthen my support for them even further. I'm also glad that they're not wanting to raise corporation and income tax too much, and are instead focusing on tackling tax avoidance and evasion.

More controversially, I disagree with them on scrapping tuition fees, to pick out the most prominent area of disagreement. However, in terms of policies, I'm far closer to Labour at this moment in time than to any other party.
I agree with you on tuition fees, I think it should be reduced to £3000
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EuanF
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#11
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Depends on a lot of things. What happens on June 23, what happens in the next four years, do I have a decent independent candidate or not etc etc
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Tej98
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Personally, if Labour carry on the way they are under Corbyn and McDonnell then I will not vote for the party. I do somewhat support their ideologies in regards to education and scrapping tuition fees but then again this would create more burden on a government. I supported Labour in 2015 when Ed Miliband was still in charge as I believed he had direction as well as a good balance in his manifesto. As ever I was gutted when the party lost the election so badly and defied the polls too.

Broadly speaking, I am much more of a Blairite if I'm honest perhaps a touch of a Brownite too. I think that New Labour achieved a lot in its 13 years and was able to balance public services efficiently as well as build upon a growing economy. The elements of choice and competition offered throughout key public sector industries was a vital step in a 21st Century Britain gasping for adequate attention. The 1997 election and the landslide Labour achieved was euphoric yes but 19 years later it's hard to imagine it being repeated anytime soon.

At the moment the party's policies are somewhat mixed up, e.g on defence the main figures want to scrap Trident but many are in favour of keeping it. Corbyn wants to nationalise the banks, the railways, etc which is at odds with the revised Clause IV first introduced by Tony Blair in 1995. When I see them in debates or in the news there is nothing that makes me say 'Labour look like a government in waiting' but instead I dare say they look like a protest movement against austerity. Corbyn is far too left wing as are McDonnell, Abbott, Thornbury and co to convince me to once again support Labour as much as I once did. If Britain were to go to the polls today, I would vote Conservative as their centre-right ideologies and agendas look much more practical in comparison. Again, the Conservatives are hugely divided therefore vulnerable and any previous Labour opposition would exploit it but the current opposition is by and large weak.

The boundary changes proposed in 2018 will make it harder for Labour and easier for the Conservatives to gain more seats. Labour are also behind in most of the opinion polls since 2015; it would take at least a consistent 10% lead here for the party to gain an overall majority. A lot of people have switched allegiance to UKIP in which they see a political party which understands their cause and underlying desires. There is then the issue of Scotland, where the SNP reign supreme and it is highly unlikely that there will be any reversal of this popularity for the nationalists.

For the given reasons, no I will not be voting Labour in its current state. Unless a centrist politician on the right of the party such as Dan Jarvis, Chuka Umunna, Keir Starmer, etc takes the reigns of the Labour leadership I won't give my full support to the party. I don't believe New Labour should be brought back but rather ideologies and methods that intermingle more precisely with a modernised world and a tired electorate. The party is too half hearted in its commitments to be taken seriously and those who voted 'for a new kind of politics' voted to keep Labour in opposition until at least 2030..
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