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    Physics or any type of engineering. Which one is more useful and likely to get you employed?
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    Choose one depending on your interests. They can both get you employed but engineering (specifically a MEng) might make it easier for you to get into an engineering job and get chartered. For physics research careers, you need a PhD so that might not be viable career route if you're not super interested in physics. Both degrees open up a whole lot of graduate jobs like accounting, IT, consulting, actuarial, software engineering and teaching, among others.
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    Engineering if you are not interested in a physics based career (e.g. research) that isn't an engineering profession.
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    can't say which one is more useful because that depends on what you want to do with your life, but broadly speaking, an engineering degree equips you with both maths/physics knowledge + technical skills as well as management, design, creativity, etc. in a way that i don't think physics does
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    Engineering would me easier to get a job with, only in a (somewhat) relevant field though. If you ended up wanting to go into finance or something then it wouldn't matter which you had. If you wanted to go into a more specific tech related obviously an engineering degree will hold more weight than a physics one. That said, you can do a MSc in engineering subjects after a BSc in physics. It really depends on where your interests are and where you career aspirations lay, nobody can really say for sure which will be better for getting a job as they have no idea what job you are after.

    Check out Gradcracker, you can look as some graduate/placement opportunities and check the requirements. You'll find an awful lot will be exclusive to engineers, but many accept subjects from sciences and mathematics also.
    http://www.gradcracker.com/
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    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    Engineering would me easier to get a job with, only in a (somewhat) relevant field though. If you ended up wanting to go into finance or something then it wouldn't matter which you had. If you wanted to go into a more specific tech related obviously an engineering degree will hold more weight than a physics one. That said, you can do a MSc in engineering subjects after a BSc in physics. It really depends on where your interests are and where you career aspirations lay, nobody can really say for sure which will be better for getting a job as they have no idea what job you are after.

    Check out Gradcracker, you can look as some graduate/placement opportunities and check the requirements. You'll find an awful lot will be exclusive to engineers, but many accept subjects from sciences and mathematics also.
    http://www.gradcracker.com/
    Doing an Msc in an engineering course after a physics degree is probably a bad idea. I'm applying for civil engineering and you need to have all the broad knowledge you learn at bachelor when working as a civil engineer, it will be very hard when working with just the specialised masters.
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    Doing an Msc in an engineering course after a physics degree is probably a bad idea. I'm applying for civil engineering and you need to have all the broad knowledge you learn at bachelor when working as a civil engineer, it will be very hard when working with just the specialised masters.
    there are MSc courses tailored for non-engineering graduates. These obviously won't be as in-depth as those designed for graduates from a relevant engineering subject, as they will have foundation modules to do as well as the important core advanced ones. The problem is getting chartered status afterwards, you'd need to carefully plan it to make sure that the subject you pick at BSc level will allow chartered status coupled with a MSc. I know that civil is quite hard for this, as you'd require a lot of geophysics stuff not taught on a typical physics degree. In contrast, an electronics, materials etc engineering degree would have more in common with a physics degree, ie quantum mechanics, conductivity, etc.

    So it depends on the MSc choice and what sort of physics have been studied really.

    That said, I agree with where you are coming from. Due to the lack of overlap with physics and civil engineering, taking a MSc will still be a disadvantage compared with taking a MEng initially. The MSc option really is just more of a back up if you decide you don't want to go into researching physics. The best option would be just to get a MEng in the first place!
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    Interesting, yeah I definitely find the raw physics more interesting its just that I've been hearing all these things about it not being very useful for most jobs as there's a more useful degree you can do... eg. with finance there's accounting, and with many science based jobs there's a form of engineering
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    (Original post by Lion_E)
    Which one is more useful and likely to get you employed?
    Employed doing what?
 
 
 
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