Bv12827
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Hi, I have just completed my National 5 exams and am preparing to start Higher courses. I was wondering how big the step up from National 5 to Higher in terms of difficulty and work load actually is. I will be taking English, Maths, Physics, Chemistry and Computing Science. Thanks!
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1420787
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It is a big step up, but so is any qualification really. Be prepared to put in the hours.
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username1842595
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Its really hard. But it wont be hard if you revise continuously throughout the year and dont revise last minute. You have to stay focused throughout the year and pay attention in class. If you feel like you done well in National 5 you should buy the Higher How to Pass books for each subject and start reading over them to get an idea of whats in the course. Good luck.
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Caecillius_99
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For the subjects you have taken it will be a bit of a step up, just make sure you focus and work hard in class and make sure to ask your teacher about anything you're unsure about and do practice questions in your spare time to help improve on the things you're not too sure about
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Caecillius_99
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English is almost the same as National 5 just slightly different in terms of the close reading format and you have to provide more detailed analysis for marks, Maths is hard to come to terms with at the start but by the end of the course it will feel a lot easier if you understand all the topics and know how to do the common exam questions, in regards to the other subjects I'm not sure how big the step up is but other people have said they are quite hard
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rebeccas23
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Physics & English weren't actually too much of a step up, just continually revise throughout the year and you'll be fine. Maths is the biggest jump in my opinion, so you have to work a lot more than you did for Nat 5.
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PTS_99
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Computing is barely a jump at all, a lot of the content is very similar to the N5 (which is what makes it good to crash).
Physics is a step up but when you finish certain parts of the course you will realise that you have learnt the reasons/theory behind some of the 'hard facts' that you were taught at N5 (specifically LEDs, photoelectric effect, doppler effect).
English is basically the same course in my opinion, the folio pieces just have a higher limit and you're expected to have a slightly better explanation of your points in Set Texts.
Maths is a massive step up from N5, and is definitely one to prioritise from an early stage.

As others have said, putting a study plan in place well before your exams (should be in place by Christmas is general consensus) and sticking to it throughout the year will be very beneficial to you. Past papers are also a great resource (old Higher especially - not available for Comp. Sci. but your teacher could be able to help you with that) along with Specimen & Exemplar papers that are available for all subjects for free from the SQA, although some of these are to a better standard than others.
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jj1814
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I'm doing English, Spanish, Computing, Modern Studies and (hopefully) Music next year, are any of those a big difference from N5?
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qasim-98
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(Original post by Conlyn)
Hi, I have just completed my National 5 exams and am preparing to start Higher courses. I was wondering how big the step up from National 5 to Higher in terms of difficulty and work load actually is. I will be taking English, Maths, Physics, Chemistry and Computing Science. Thanks!
Maths is pish the jump isn't that big, English isn't that different to nat 5, chemistry isn't that much of a jump but the calculations I think are a bit harder ( as expected) and I think there is more of a focus on the researching Chem unit at higher too. Computing for me was difficult because I crashed it but it was similar to nat 5, it just included more detail and ability to write programs, as one of my friends who sat n5 said
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Ethan100
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I'm in the same position as Conlyn and I take similar subjects, I was just wondering if the Higher how to pass books are any good for these subjects, mainly Chemistry,Physics and Computing ?
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qasim-98
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(Original post by Ethan100)
I'm in the same position as Conlyn and I take similar subjects, I was just wondering if the Higher how to pass books are any good for these subjects, mainly Chemistry,Physics and Computing ?
Don't get the how to pass computing guide I swear you will throw it in the bin it's so shi*t, it's really bad. The chemistry one is ok, it's the exact same as the textbook because they are both Written by John Anderson, if you're looking to save money then your best going with how to pass guides
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PTS_99
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(Original post by Ethan100)
I'm in the same position as Conlyn and I take similar subjects, I was just wondering if the Higher how to pass books are any good for these subjects, mainly Chemistry,Physics and Computing ?
The How to Pass books for Physics and Computing are ok. As with all books for a computing subject it depends on whether you'll use Python or not because thats what all the examples are in (wasn't too helpful to me using Visual Basic...), the rest of it is ok though. The Physics book has some areas that it covers in too much detail, and others that it doesn't do into enough detail for which can be annoying but again ok overall.
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Ethan100
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(Original post by PTS_99)
The How to Pass books for Physics and Computing are ok. As with all books for a computing subject it depends on whether you'll use Python or not because thats what all the examples are in (wasn't too helpful to me using Visual Basic...), the rest of it is ok though. The Physics book has some areas that it covers in too much detail, and others that it doesn't do into enough detail for which can be annoying but again ok overall.
Wow, if it's Python then that's amazing, I used Python for Nat5. I have the Nat 5 computing science book and had to totally scrap the majority of the first Unit because it was basically all Visual Basics and Scratch.

If we do carry on using the same programming language then it would be really useful :P

Thanks !
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username1842595
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Sometimes the How to Pass books have stuff missing from them or ADDITIONAL content that you don't even need to know.

For example: When I was studying for the N5 Physics exam, the How to Pass book has semiconducters n type and p type and junctions or some **** and when I checked BBC Bitesize's notes, that section wasn't even included. Had to ask various higher students and N5 students if they learned this and higher students said it was only in the Higher course.

Therefore, when you're revising it's worth comparing the How to Pass notes to BBC Bitesize notes and see which has which sections etc. Sometimes the BBC Bitesize notes don't have some sections included either so make sure to communicate with your teacher and clarify what is in the course because you really don't want to be missing out chunks of info.

IMPORTANT EDIT: Please don't piss around when you're doing your highers and skip classes. You'll think you know everything but you'll genuinely fail. I'm speaking from experience. Lesson learnt the hard way.
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PTS_99
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(Original post by sameehaiqbal)
Sometimes the How to Pass books have stuff missing from them or ADDITIONAL content that you don't even need to know.

For example: When I was studying for the N5 Physics exam, the How to Pass book has semiconducters n type and p type and junctions or some **** and when I checked BBC Bitesize's notes, that section wasn't even included. Had to ask various higher students and N5 students if they learned this and higher students said it was only in the Higher course.

Therefore, when you're revising it's worth comparing the How to Pass notes to BBC Bitesize notes and see which has which sections etc. Sometimes the BBC Bitesize notes don't have some sections included either so make sure to communicate with your teacher and clarify what is in the course because you really don't want to be missing out chunks of info.

IMPORTANT EDIT: Please don't piss around when you're doing your highers and skip classes. You'll think you know everything but you'll genuinely fail. I'm speaking from experience. Lesson learnt the hard way.
Some excellent advice here (especially that last edit, thinking you know it isn't the same as actually knowing guys...).
Your teachers as well will also be able to shed some (usually a lot) light on how good the extra books that are available for your course are, and also whether they are used as part of teaching the course (not much point buying the book when your school gives you a copy for the year is there?).
Remember that some courses don't have textbooks or how to pass guides yet (thanks for your undying support publishers of Scottish textbooks, again). Many have been delayed but most will still be available for you guys.


(Original post by Ethan100)
Wow, if it's Python then that's amazing, I used Python for Nat5. I have the Nat 5 computing science book and had to totally scrap the majority of the first Unit because it was basically all Visual Basics and Scratch.If we do carry on using the same programming language then it would be really useful :PThanks !
I'm pretty sure it's Python anyway, I'll have to double check though.
You guys are lucky though, there's meant to be an actual textbook out for you guys next year, although it is Leckie & Leckie who are well known for crappy business & computing literature.
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