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    Basically i'm quite a quiet person and around new groups and large numbers, i don't like making speeches etc. I'm not totally introvert as I'm loud within my group of friends. I also feel like I would be capable with talking to paitents on a 1 to 1 level. However, I always get the idea that you need to be really extrovert to do a medicine degree and the other people applying for medicine in my year are all really loud... It makes me slightly nervous...do you think I am capable of being a doctor and doing a medicine degree??
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    If you really want it you can definitely try. But you'd have to be willing to adapt. It will probably improve once you progress.
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    (Original post by medicstar)
    Basically i'm quite a quiet person and around new groups and large numbers, i don't like making speeches etc. I'm not totally introvert as I'm loud within my group of friends. I also feel like I would be capable with talking to paitents on a 1 to 1 level. However, I always get the idea that you need to be really extrovert to do a medicine degree and the other people applying for medicine in my year are all really loud... It makes me slightly nervous...do you think I am capable of being a doctor and doing a medicine degree??
    An introvert isn't just someone who sits in a corner and never likes speaking to people. And yes, it's fine to be a doctor and an introvert/shy, as long as you have decent communication skills (the two are far from mutually exclusive!) - and being an extrovert doesn't necessarily make you better or more suited.

    I'm a fairly strong introvert and it's not a problem in medicine. Interactions with patients are not the same as making small talk with a stranger - there's a purpose to your conversation and you'll get taught plenty of structure for history taking etc. You will have to make presentations in front of groups on occasion (though this has never bothered me, again I think because giving a prepared speech is different from having to chat) and you will gradually learn how to deal with different staff - the loud people have to do this too! I found a few situations stressful, like being in a busy A&E with 15 people talking at once, but one of the beauties of my specialty (anaesthetics) is that I get enough "alone time" to feel energised for when I do have to talk to people.
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    Not a problem.
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    Im pretty much 50% split introvert/extrovert dependent upon the situation and the company I am with and my frame of mind at the time. I can swing quite easily from being the guy in the corner looking for an escape to being the centre of attention. Both of these things have been both helpful and a hindrance at med school. Your personality will never decide whether you can make it as a doctor. Your ability to adapt to situations (which granted can be influenced by how introverted you are, but you develop as a professional), your ability to retain and communicate information, and your ability to manage and prioritise your time will be so much more important to your success!
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    I think Helenia provides a good overview ...

    you must be able to communicate and take charge when it is appropriate to do so , you cannot rely on others to do that, although it does happen and sometimes it will be quite junior staff that do so .
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    Also bear in mind that you're what, 18 when you go to medical school. And 23-24 by the time you leave. You've got a lot of time to become more confident, and besides the job makes you more confident - because you kind of have to be!

    Being introverted is in itself not a hinderance. IMO it's just confidence to do the job and talk to people, which is something you develop over time if you don't have it already.
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    (Original post by seaholme)
    Being introverted is in itself not a hinderance. IMO it's just confidence to do the job and talk to people, which is something you develop over time if you don't have it already.
    Absolutely this, and time is the biggest factor. I remember when I started clinical and first stepped on the wards I felt so lost, would just stand around hoping someone would talk to me. Felt awkward talking to patients. But I think that's pretty normal. Over time you feel more and more like you belong, you get used to the system, you develop a patter for introducing yourself, and before you know it you're walking onto the wards with a 'morning, sister, where do you do board round?'. I wouldn't believe it if it hadn't happened to me
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    An introvert isn't just someone who sits in a corner and never likes speaking to people. And yes, it's fine to be a doctor and an introvert/shy, as long as you have decent communication skills (the two are far from mutually exclusive!) - and being an extrovert doesn't necessarily make you better or more suited.

    I'm a fairly strong introvert and it's not a problem in medicine. Interactions with patients are not the same as making small talk with a stranger - there's a purpose to your conversation and you'll get taught plenty of structure for history taking etc. You will have to make presentations in front of groups on occasion (though this has never bothered me, again I think because giving a prepared speech is different from having to chat) and you will gradually learn how to deal with different staff - the loud people have to do this too! I found a few situations stressful, like being in a busy A&E with 15 people talking at once, but one of the beauties of my specialty (anaesthetics) is that I get enough "alone time" to feel energised for when I do have to talk to people.
    Could you expand on the presentations you have to do? Is that part of your job and did you have to present at Uni?
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    (Original post by cookiemunch12)
    Could you expand on the presentations you have to do? Is that part of your job and did you have to present at Uni?
    Most unis will make you do various kinds of presentation as part of your course - this might just be a short talk to a small group, or a full powerpoint job to a huge lecture theatre. The scariest one I did was probably a hospital grand round - 100+ doctors including consultants, plus a similar number of students, presenting the research project I did on my elective - but this was a prize competition presentation, not compulsor. Post-graduation you will be expected to get involved in audit/research, which will have to be presented at some point, and lots of trainees also do teaching for juniors/medical students. Quite a few interviews/postgrad exams will also include a presentation section. Being able to speak in public is a valuable skill.
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    (Original post by Ghotay)
    Absolutely this, and time is the biggest factor. I remember when I started clinical and first stepped on the wards I felt so lost, would just stand around hoping someone would talk to me. Felt awkward talking to patients. But I think that's pretty normal. Over time you feel more and more like you belong, you get used to the system, you develop a patter for introducing yourself, and before you know it you're walking onto the wards with a 'morning, sister, where do you do board round?'. I wouldn't believe it if it hadn't happened to me
    thank you!! thats really reassured me because your description of what you were like when you first started is what i'm scared of being like.
 
 
 
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