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    How would you answer this question... -_- I ticked what I thought was logical but apparently it is incorrect. what would be your answer and what is your reasoning?

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    (Original post by Someboady)
    How would you answer this question... -_- I ticked what I thought was logical but apparently it is incorrect. what would be your answer and what is your reasoning?

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    They are two separate pulses and neither encounter a boundary, so the pulses would travel through each other. They would obey the principle of superposition at the point at which they occupy the same space, but they would then continue travelling along the string.

    What did you think was the logical option?
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    I think its either A or C but probably C because it says after they've passed through each other
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    I'd put down C since they superpose at opposite phases.
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    (Original post by aamirac)
    I'd put down C since they superpose at opposite phases.
    Aye this is correct. I assumed that when two pulses travel in opposite directiosn, they cancel out so I put A. But they have this effect only at that single moment and then they continue travelling as though they never met.
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    (Original post by Someboady)
    Aye this is correct. I assumed that when two pulses travel in opposite directiosn, they cancel out so I put A. But they have this effect only at that single moment and then they continue travelling as though they never met.
    I initially thought A too. (But then I read the question again ).

    I wonder why/how superposition happens? :holmes: But that's a question for another time :lol:
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    (Original post by Someboady)
    Aye this is correct. I assumed that when two pulses travel in opposite directiosn, they cancel out so I put A. But they have this effect only at that single moment and then they continue travelling as though they never met.
    Remember, it's the amplitude of two waves that superpose, not their velocities That's why you can get standing waves on a string fixed at either end.
 
 
 
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