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    For nursing, speech pathology, or occupational therapy 😳
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    (Original post by Alexa.Pereira)
    For nursing, speech pathology, or occupational therapy 😳
    I can only speak for nursing courses, however I assume the entry requirements for other allied health courses are similar. Entry requirements throughout Scotland are all quite similar (apart from Edinburgh, Glasgow and QMU which generally have higher grade requirements). Degrees without the honours year are also lower. Dundee, Stirling, UWS, RGU, Napier and Cali are all very similar in their academic requirements.

    Bear in mind that entry requirements tend to be lower for nursing and allied health courses as more emphasis is placed on interview, other tests, personal statement, work experience and volunteering and it is not enough to simply meet the entry requirements. There is high demand for these courses so none are easy to get into in the sense that there are many applicants for a limited number of spaces.

    I really would encourage you to choose your degree based on work experience, the job you want and choosing a city you would be happy living in, rather than the entry requirements. By all means, use these to exclude any unrealistic options, but make sure you end up somewhere you want to be.
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    (Original post by Charlotte49)
    I can only speak for nursing courses, however I assume the entry requirements for other allied health courses are similar. Entry requirements throughout Scotland are all quite similar (apart from Edinburgh, Glasgow and QMU which generally have higher grade requirements). Degrees without the honours year are also lower. Dundee, Stirling, UWS, RGU, Napier and Cali are all very similar in their academic requirements.

    Bear in mind that entry requirements tend to be lower for nursing and allied health courses as more emphasis is placed on interview, other tests, personal statement, work experience and volunteering and it is not enough to simply meet the entry requirements. There is high demand for these courses so none are easy to get into in the sense that there are many applicants for a limited number of spaces.

    I really would encourage you to choose your degree based on work experience, the job you want and choosing a city you would be happy living in, rather than the entry requirements. By all means, use these to exclude any unrealistic options, but make sure you end up somewhere you want to be.
    I would be applying with a distante learning access diploma and I do have 2 years experience as a healthcare assistant, would that be of any help to being admitted?
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    (Original post by Alexa.Pereira)
    I would be applying with a distante learning access diploma and I do have 2 years experience as a healthcare assistant, would that be of any help to being admitted?
    The access diploma (assuming it is one that is accepted by the universities you are interested in, you should phone admissions to check before applying) is more of a requirement than something that would demonstrate your passion for nursing/caring.

    You will have developed valuable skills and experience through your HCA job, it is important that you draw on these in your personal statement. Some additional work experience or volunteering is useful to make your application more appealing to admissions tutors, but also to give you further insight into the role of these staff and the client groups they might work with. It doesn't need to be hospital based, you could consider care homes, working with homeless people, drug users, befriending elderly people etc. Even if you were just to do something for a couple of days, it would be a useful experience.
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    (Original post by Charlotte49)
    The access diploma (assuming it is one that is accepted by the universities you are interested in, you should phone admissions to check before applying) is more of a requirement than something that would demonstrate your passion for nursing/caring.

    You will have developed valuable skills and experience through your HCA job, it is important that you draw on these in your personal statement. Some additional work experience or volunteering is useful to make your application more appealing to admissions tutors, but also to give you further insight into the role of these staff and the client groups they might work with. It doesn't need to be hospital based, you could consider care homes, working with homeless people, drug users, befriending elderly people etc. Even if you were just to do something for a couple of days, it would be a useful experience.
    Thank you very much, I really appreciate your insight. I will be 21 when I apply, but will look into getting some more experience in the mean time.
 
 
 
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