Matthew.bryant
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
Does anybody have any tips on this exam? Anything which could help me out as im really struggling to revise for this exam!
0
reply
Certified
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
DAFOREST for last question
0
reply
luciie
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
(Original post by Matthew.bryant)
Does anybody have any tips on this exam? Anything which could help me out as im really struggling to revise for this exam!

*Credit to the videos below for all this

Q1:
This isn't a language analysis question. Don't waste your time writing about why the writer may have used certain words - save it for question 4!
Look for inconsistencies in the article.
Don't just regurgitate what the article says
Go into detail and link e.g if the article says ''scientists think animal testing should be banned'', don't just simply write that. Elaborate and try to connect it to other parts of the article
Cover the whole article. Don't just write a paragraph on the beginning and three on the middle, try and write about the whole thing and what it's trying to say.

Q2:
Don't link the headline and picture together
Don't write basic things such as ''the headline is bold so it makes it stand out'' or ''the picture has a dog in it which shows the article is about dogs''. Be perceptive, look for things that no one else will notice.
You don't just have to write about the obvious things for the picture. You can write about things such as colours and what they might symbolise.

Q3:
Don't pick out things that already show what the reader is feeling/thinking. If there is a part on the extract where the writer states that they're feeling sad, don't just write ''oh this quote shows that the writer is feeling sad''. Like all of the other questions, be perceptive, look for things that others won't see.
There is usually in mood change in all of the extracts, look out for that.

Q4:
Don't feel like you have to just look for DAFOREST techniques. If you see a significant word/s that you think will be worthwhile to write about then write about it.
Your linking doesn't have to be exact. Don't feel like that if you see a simile in one text then you have to compare it to a simile in another text. You could just write about how it can make the reader feel e.g if that simile makes the reader feel scared then look for other things in the other article that could also make the reader feel scared. It could be a metaphor, a statistic, etc.
Don't write about sentence length, audience type or purpose. It isn't rewarded so you'll be wasting your time - focus on the language

Q5 & Q6:
Use as many language devices as you can e.g: rhetorical questions, humour, alliteration, repetition, facts, statisitcs, lists, similies, metaphors, hyperbole, personifcation, imperatives, superlatives etc.
Try and use a range of sentence types
Try and use a range of punctuation
I would try and do Q6 first as it's worth more marks

Good luck with the exam!
1
reply
chocolatefrog354
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
(Original post by luciie)
q1:
Look for inconsistencies in the article
don't just regurgitate what the article says
go into detail and link e.g if the article says ''scientists think animal testing should be banned'', don't just simply write that. Elaborate and try to connect it to other parts of the article
cover the whole article. Don't just write a paragraph on the beginning and three on the middle, try and write about the whole thing and what it's trying to say

q2:
Don't link the headline and picture together
don't write basic things such as ''the headline is bold so it makes it stand out'' or ''the picture has a dog in it which shows the article is about dogs''. Be perceptive, look for things that no one else will notice.

Q3:
Don't pick out things that already show what the reader is feeling/thinking. If there is a part on the extract where the writer states that they're feeling sad, don't just write ''oh this quote shows that the writer is feeling sad''. Like all of the other questions, be perceptive, look for things that others won't see.
There is usually in mood change in all of the extracts, look out for that.

Q4:
Don't feel like you have to just look for daforest techniques. If you see a significant word/s that you think will be worthwhile to write about then write about it.
Your linking doesn't have to be exact. Don't feel like that if you see a simile in one text then you have to compare it to a simile in another text. You could just write about how it can make the reader feel e.g if that simile makes the reader feel scared then look for other things in the other article that could also make the reader feel scared. It could be a metaphor, a statistic, etc.
Don't write about sentence length, audience type or purpose. It isn't rewarded so you'll be wasting your time - focus on the language

q5 & q6:
Use as many language devices as you can e.g: Rhetorical questions, humour, alliteration, repetition, facts, statisitcs, lists, similies, metaphors, hyperbole, personifcation, imperatives, superlatives etc.
Try and use a range of sentence types
try and use a range of punctuation
i would try and do q6 first as it's worth more marks

good luck with the exam!
that is so useful thanks so muchhhhhh
0
reply
luciie
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 5 years ago
#5
(Original post by chocolatefrog354)
that is so useful thanks so muchhhhhh
You're welcome! Good luck with the exam
0
reply
chocolatefrog354
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 years ago
#6
(Original post by luciie)
You're welcome! Good luck with the exam
Good luck everyone!
0
reply
Matthew.bryant
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#7
(Original post by luciie)
Q1:
This isn't a language analysis question. Don't waste your time writing about why the writer may have used certain words - save it for question 4!
Look for inconsistencies in the article.
Don't just regurgitate what the article says
Go into detail and link e.g if the article says ''scientists think animal testing should be banned'', don't just simply write that. Elaborate and try to connect it to other parts of the article
Cover the whole article. Don't just write a paragraph on the beginning and three on the middle, try and write about the whole thing and what it's trying to say.

Q2:
Don't link the headline and picture together
Don't write basic things such as ''the headline is bold so it makes it stand out'' or ''the picture has a dog in it which shows the article is about dogs''. Be perceptive, look for things that no one else will notice.
You don't just have to write about the obvious things for the picture. You can write about things such as colours and what they might symbolise.

Q3:
Don't pick out things that already show what the reader is feeling/thinking. If there is a part on the extract where the writer states that they're feeling sad, don't just write ''oh this quote shows that the writer is feeling sad''. Like all of the other questions, be perceptive, look for things that others won't see.
There is usually in mood change in all of the extracts, look out for that.

Q4:
Don't feel like you have to just look for DAFOREST techniques. If you see a significant word/s that you think will be worthwhile to write about then write about it.
Your linking doesn't have to be exact. Don't feel like that if you see a simile in one text then you have to compare it to a simile in another text. You could just write about how it can make the reader feel e.g if that simile makes the reader feel scared then look for other things in the other article that could also make the reader feel scared. It could be a metaphor, a statistic, etc.
Don't write about sentence length, audience type or purpose. It isn't rewarded so you'll be wasting your time - focus on the language

Q5 & Q6:
Use as many language devices as you can e.g: rhetorical questions, humour, alliteration, repetition, facts, statisitcs, lists, similies, metaphors, hyperbole, personifcation, imperatives, superlatives etc.
Try and use a range of sentence types
Try and use a range of punctuation
I would try and do Q6 first as it's worth more marks

Good luck with the exam!
thanks, and good luck to you to!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What support do you need with your UCAS application?

I need help researching unis (29)
13.62%
I need help researching courses (14)
6.57%
I need help with filling out the application form (9)
4.23%
I need help with my personal statement (89)
41.78%
I need help with understanding how to make my application stand out (52)
24.41%
I need help with something else (let us know in the thread!) (4)
1.88%
I'm feeling confident about my application and don't need any help at the moment (16)
7.51%

Watched Threads

View All