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pwaring
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#1
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#1
Does anyone know what the difference is between these two doctorates? I've noticed that universities such as Oxford and Sussex use DPhil, but the University of Manchester (where I'm at now) uses PhD exclusively - and the latter seems to be more popular generally. I can't find a decent online reference which explains the differences (if any) between the two - are they simply different names for the same qualification or is one of them considered to be higher than the other or more desirable?
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ChemistBoy
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#2
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They are the same.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PhD
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pwaring
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I thought they were the same, but that doesn't really explain why some universities use DPhil but the majority use PhD - I would have thought they would have standardised on one or the other by now.
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ChemistBoy
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(Original post by pwaring)
I thought they were the same, but that doesn't really explain why some universities use DPhil but the majority use PhD - I would have thought they would have standardised on one or the other by now.
Well trying to get oxford to adopt an american custom will never be easy or fast...
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hobnob
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(Original post by pwaring)
I thought they were the same, but that doesn't really explain why some universities use DPhil but the majority use PhD - I would have thought they would have standardised on one or the other by now.
Well, there's nothing to standardise, though, is there? They're just two names for the same thing, but they can't really be confused with anything else. I'd say it would make far more sense to standardise the meaning of 'MPhil', as that can actually be misleading.

Edit: bizarre typo.
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ChemistBoy
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(Original post by hobnob)
Well, there's nothing to standardise, though, is there? They're just two names for the same thing, but they can't really be confused with anything else. I'd say it would make far more sense to standardise the meaning of 'MPhil', as that can actually be misleading.

Edit: bizarre typo.
To be honest the PhD/DPhil is a hell of a lot more standardised in name compared to most other degrees!
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The Boosh
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DPhil and PhD translate into doctor of philosophy and philosophy doctor - outside of their initialled format the title of qualifications are less ambiguous. I suppose it's similar to the way BEd (Hons) QTS and BA (Education) QTS present i.e. different initialing but same status (i.e. a bachelors degree leading to qualified teacher status).

Why on earth Britain adopted an American title without the American format is beyond me. American PhDs are nothing like British PhDs
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Alan Smithee
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What a pointless thread.
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Phoenix Wright
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DPhil, as has been pointed out, is simply the abbreviation for PhD backwards (sorta). Interestingly, Harvard and MIT give out SM and AM (instead of MSc or MA) which follows the same trend as the DPhil.
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The Boosh
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#10
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bunch of wanky backwards muppets
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cubes
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#11
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(Original post by The Boosh)
Why on earth Britain adopted an American title without the American format is beyond me. American PhDs are nothing like British PhDs
Just out of curiosity, what is the difference?
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The Boosh
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American PhDs are twice as long at British PhDs and contain a heavy amount of taught elements (perhaps akin to our masters and our undergrad studies). A PhD in the UK is a pure research qualification, but in the states there is much more to it. I suppose, in the social sciences, the length of time is increasing: imagine a general BSc (Hons) in psychology, an MSc in developmental biopsychology, then a further MSc/MRes in research methodology - necessary for funding, then then PhD = 3 years undergrad + 5 years postgrad. Or, BSc, MSc, DClinPsych then PhD (a common route for lecturers in clinical psychology).
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shady lane
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A US PhD is a research qualification; the reason for the teaching is that it's usually an MA+PhD combined. If you complete the taught portion and don't do the research, you get an MA.
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The Boosh
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so how are the extra years divided up? how many years do you spend on taught elements and on research elements?
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hermaphrodite
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they're both the same thing
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shady lane
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#16
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(Original post by The Boosh)
so how are the extra years divided up? how many years do you spend on taught elements and on research elements?
1-2 years on teaching, but many PhD programs will allow students to place out of that if they have an MA/MSc in a related subject.
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The Boosh
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#17
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so, if a fresh graduate in the states embarks on a phd, the first 1-2 years are spent studying a masters, whilst the next 4-5 are spent on research? 4-5 years sounds like a long time, is it pure research during this time, like the british phds?
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shady lane
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#18
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No no, it's 5 years total, including the studying part.
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The Boosh
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#19
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aaaaaaah ok.
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Ghost Grey
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#20
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The reason for PhD being 'backwards' is because it is latin I thought. It doesn't translate literally into Philosophy Doctor at all, but latin 'Philosophiæ Doctor', meaning "teacher of philosophy.
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