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    It was what I've always wanted to study, but unfortunately I didn't get the grades. I somehow managed to get onto a (Geo)Physics course at my firm choice, even though I didn't have the A - Levels for that as well.

    So far, I'm doing well averaging upper 2:1, but aiming for a 1st overall. I've studied mathematics to a high level for my Physics modules, as well as topics like electromagnetism, fluid/thermodynamics, programming in matlab/unix environments etc.

    I believe I'll have the skill set and academic ability to study an MSc in Aerospace Eng, despite not having a degree in Aerospace Engineering at BEng level. Partly because I've seen the exams that the engineers take as well as their lecture notes (I've lived with 4 engineers so far).


    I'm looking to apply for a MSc at my current university. It costs £5500 and I've been checking out the new loan system for post grads coming into effect 2016/17. (Because I'm looking to apply at my current university, there is a potential 20% discount I can apply for).

    I'd be paying back the loan for my undergrad BSc AND my MSc, as two seperate entities.

    Academically, this is what I want to do and specialise in. Professionally, is where the doubt comes in. I've watched my housemate (MEng) get lots of job offers from the big engineering firms so he was in a strong position. He believes this was because of the Masters, he has no work experience in the engineering sector. My line of thinking is that, I probably won't have a better time to do a Masters. I'm single, no real responsibilities like children etc so it's quite financially viable and I have the time.

    My questions are is it worth it from a professional standpoint? Is a MSc a big plus when applying to jobs, or is it more of a tick in a box? From what I've seen, it's not necessarily a requirement. What advantages does having an MSc provide for those that go into engineering?
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    You seem to have thought this through well in terms of now being the right time to do it. Whether or not you should depends on how interested you are in the subject and whether you'll regret not doing it later and whether you need it to apply for jobs. Have a look at jobs you may be interested in and see what their requirements are.
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
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    It was what I've always wanted to study, but unfortunately I didn't get the grades. I somehow managed to get onto a (Geo)Physics course at my firm choice, even though I didn't have the A - Levels for that as well.

    So far, I'm doing well averaging upper 2:1, but aiming for a 1st overall. I've studied mathematics to a high level for my Physics modules, as well as topics like electromagnetism, fluid/thermodynamics, programming in matlab/unix environments etc.

    I believe I'll have the skill set and academic ability to study an MSc in Aerospace Eng, despite not having a degree in Aerospace Engineering at BEng level. Partly because I've seen the exams that the engineers take as well as their lecture notes (I've lived with 4 engineers so far).


    I'm looking to apply for a MSc at my current university. It costs £5500 and I've been checking out the new loan system for post grads coming into effect 2016/17. (Because I'm looking to apply at my current university, there is a potential 20% discount I can apply for).

    I'd be paying back the loan for my undergrad BSc AND my MSc, as two seperate entities.

    Academically, this is what I want to do and specialise in. Professionally, is where the doubt comes in. I've watched my housemate (MEng) get lots of job offers from the big engineering firms so he was in a strong position. He believes this was because of the Masters, he has no work experience in the engineering sector. My line of thinking is that, I probably won't have a better time to do a Masters. I'm single, no real responsibilities like children etc so it's quite financially viable and I have the time.

    My questions are is it worth it from a professional standpoint? Is a MSc a big plus when applying to jobs, or is it more of a tick in a box? From what I've seen, it's not necessarily a requirement. What advantages does having an MSc provide for those that go into engineering?
    Companies like recruiting masters level engineers because they satisfy the academic requirements for chartership, and with the introduction of the integrated masters MEng degree it's much more straightforward to obtain said masters.

    However, you should be aware that often an MSc does not make up for the lack of a BEng. I'm not sure if employment prospects are necessarily the same for those who went from a non-engineering undergrad to an MSc, as they are for those who did their MEng (or BEng and MSc).
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Companies like recruiting masters level engineers because they satisfy the academic requirements for chartership, and with the introduction of the integrated masters MEng degree it's much more straightforward to obtain said masters.

    However, you should be aware that often an MSc does not make up for the lack of a BEng. I'm not sure if employment prospects are necessarily the same for those who went from a non-engineering undergrad to an MSc, as they are for those who did their MEng (or BEng and MSc).
    Hmm thats interesting. Why would that be? A lot of the companies ive looked at dont specify they want exclusively BEng/MEng. They'll also say 'or relevant science degree such as physics, maths etc'
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    Hmm thats interesting. Why would that be? A lot of the companies ive looked at dont specify they want exclusively BEng/MEng. They'll also say 'or relevant science degree such as physics, maths etc'
    Depends on what type of jobs you're looking at. Some are okay with another relevant science discipline - typically the more analytical jobs - but at the same time, a one year MSc does not cover three years of BEng material, some of which is more important than the MSc stuff for many jobs, such as CAD, project work, etc.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Depends on what type of jobs you're looking at. Some are okay with another relevant science discipline - typically the more analytical jobs - but at the same time, a one year MSc does not cover three years of BEng material, some of which is more important than the MSc stuff for many jobs, such as CAD, project work, etc.
    I plan to do a more indepth search soon, the graduate programs are mostly closed now, but I've been looking at BAE systems, MBDA, smaller engineering firms and then the engineering divisions for big oil companies.

    I've had another look at the degree program, and the main project is a group design project that takes place over both semesters. There is also a larger (worth more credits) independent research project I'd undertake over the summer. Also, CAD is an optional module I could take according to the prospectus.

    :dontknow:
 
 
 
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