john2054
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Or not if anything the recent argument i have had with one tsr member tonight has proven. In his desperation to prove how much better his engineering degree was to my arts one, he failed to see that it isn't the subject but the person taking it, which is important!?!
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Imperion
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No degree does that
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Zacken
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Haven't you just done the same thing that you're complaining you friend did...?
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Ano9901whichone
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So you are saying it is the fault of just STEM degrees and you are also saying that it's down to the person doing the degree. Seems like a contradiction #.
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hezzlington
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In my stem degree I:

Have lots of reading to do, quite a big reading list (relatively). I write essays as well as technical reports (there is a big difference). I perform data collection in the field, data analysis and post processing. I get to use industry specialist software to do all this, as well as cool, very expensive hardware. I have lots of presentations. Lots of group work. I have to read new research and then discuss it in seminars. I do a lot of programming. I do a lot of maths. There are lots of times throughout my degree where there is not necessarily a 'right' answer that is immediately apparent. In my field, we call it non-uniqueness. Lots of lateral and outside-the-box thinking required because of it.

How much more well rounded do you want to get?
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gr8wizard10
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if you think a degree develops rounded individuals.. lol
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hezzlington
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(Original post by john2054)
Or not if anything the recent argument i have had with one tsr member tonight has proven. In his desperation to prove how much better his engineering degree was to my arts one, he failed to see that it isn't the subject but the person taking it, which is important!?!
Yep, really important
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hezzlington
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(Original post by gr8wizard10)
if you think a degree develops rounded individuals.. lol
I think it's down to you to use the platform a degree provides to develop yourself.
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Yua
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This is untrue. The hard sciences, as oppose to soft sciences, have more of a multi-disciplinary approach to learning. Your math helps your physics, your physics helps your chemistry, your chemistry helps your biology. This is a much better system than a degree such as economics or psychology, where the leading academics live in bubble of theory that isn't applicable in the real world. Out of all the degrees, STEM is by long and wide the most multi-disciplinary, taking elements from all of its components and using them in conjunction to reinforce one another. Any argument to the contrary would stem from a bitterness associated with those who don't take STEM but rather an arts degree, which comes from an inferiority complex that most arts people have towards stem people.
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hezzlington
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(Original post by Yua)
This is untrue. The hard sciences, as oppose to soft sciences, have more of a multi-disciplinary approach to learning. Your math helps your physics, your physics helps your chemistry, your chemistry helps your biology. This is a much better system than a degree such as economics or psychology, where the leading academics live in bubble of theory that isn't applicable in the real world. Out of all the degrees, STEM is by long and wide the most multi-disciplinary, taking elements from all of its components and using them in conjunction to reinforce one another.
Whilst I do agree with some of what you've said...

(Original post by Yua)
Any argument to the contrary would stem from a bitterness associated with those who don't take STEM but rather an arts degree, which comes from an inferiority complex that most arts people have towards stem people.
This is an unnecessary and untrue generalisation. As a STEM student, I'm constantly fascinated by the work of my non-STEM brothers and sisters. The fact I have to use STEM and non-STEM in a sentence is making me cringe.

The whole STEM vs non-STEM debate needs to die.

At the end of the day, who really gives a ****? We're all at university to better ourselves and it's none of our business what academic choices other people make. Since we're on the topic of sweeping generalisations, I'm glad there's a solid mix of STEM/non-STEM students, because frankly, most STEM students are a bunch of weird, boring introverts
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username1221160
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Exams are just finishing and many of my fellow STEM students have become very well rounded. Something to do with living on Dominos and Pringles during the revision period.

As for the whole STEM vs non-STEM debate on TSR, it's really boring.
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Ras' Al Ghul
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(Original post by john2054)
Or not if anything the recent argument i have had with one tsr member tonight has proven. In his desperation to prove how much better his engineering degree was to my arts one, he failed to see that it isn't the subject but the person taking it, which is important!?!
Are you serious? When have I been "desperate" to prove that my degree is better than yours? If anything, you're the one that's been trying to do that all along, saying things like "you'd not even get a third if you did my degree". You're very desperate to feel superior to someone doing a STEM degree. I feel sorry for you because it seems like you're banking on your degree for your sense of self worth.
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john2054
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(Original post by Ras' Al Ghul)
Are you serious? When have I been "desperate" to prove that my degree is better than yours? If anything, you're the one that's been trying to do that all along, saying things like "you'd not even get a third if you did my degree". You're very desperate to feel superior to someone doing a STEM degree. I feel sorry for you because it seems like you're banking on your degree for your sense of self worth.
some people you just can't get a rise out of huh?!
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